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eco2geek's blog

From Karmic to Lucid: Distribution Update Screenshots

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Linux

In line with its newbie-friendly tradition of providing a way to do everything via a graphical user interface, Ubuntu provides a way to do a distribution upgrade by clicking a button at the top of the Update Manager. Since version 10.04 was released on April 29, it was once again time to see how well the upgrade went. Here are screenshots of the entire process.

Freshly Squeezed Debian: Installing from Live DVD

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Reviews

Last month, the Debian Live Project released live CD and DVD images of the next version of Debian, codenamed "Squeeze." They included an installer that uses the live filesystem rather than packages, so it has the advantages of being fast and allowing you to preview on the live media, what you eventually get on your hard drive. This may not seem like a big deal, since most modern Linux distributions use this installation method, but it's still fairly new for Debian. I downloaded and installed the 64-bit GNOME version.

Secret Future Ubuntu User Interface Plans Revealed!

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Humor

Mark Shuttleworth recently said that "moving everything to the left opens up the space on the right nicely." But what "innovative options" might he be referring to? To find out, we contacted a member of Ubuntu's design team, Drew A. Gooey-Aubergine, who gave us an exclusive look at what innovative new features Ubuntu users might see on the right-hand side of their windows in future releases.

Hitch your wagon to a lizard: dist-upgrading openSUSE

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Linux

For the first time, openSUSE now officially supports a "dist-upgrade" feature, similar to Debian's. Which is to say, if you've got openSUSE 11.1 installed, you should be able to upgrade to openSUSE 11.2 by updating your list of software repositories to point to providers of software for openSUSE 11.2, doing a distribution upgrade via the Internet, and have a reasonable chance of success.

The Ubuntu 1-click dist-upgrade (well, almost)

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Linux

I was curious to try Ubuntu's offer of a "one-click upgrade" from Ubuntu 8.10 to 9.04 on my HP Pavilion zd7000 laptop. I was impressed with how easy it was.

Vector Linux 5.9: Light, fast Slackware-based distro

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Reviews

Vector Linux 5.9, released in late December of last year, is a Slackware 12.0-based distribution that uses Xfce 4.4.2 as its default user interface. Generally speaking, Xfce requires less horsepower than other UIs, like GNOME and KDE, and so Vector Linux bills itself as an excellent operating system to install on older, lower-powered computers. I've been using it for the past two weeks, and like what I see.

KDE 4.0: Everything that has an end, has a beginning

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Reviews

By now, every Linux user's heard of KDE 4.0, and the controversy surrounding its release. Here's one partisan KDE user's take on it — with screenshots.

openSUSE 10.3 in review: A solid Linux desktop

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Reviews

openSUSE is a popular German Linux distribution that Distrowatch.com lists as one of the "top ten." Version 10.3 was released on October 4th. Underneath its new green artwork, the new version's improvements include cutting down the time it takes to reach the graphical login screen; speeding up and streamlining its package management utility; and making it easier for users to install software using a new "one-click install" process. There's a lot to like here.

Beta Review: Kanotix 2007 "Thorhammer" RC5B

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Reviews

The last Kanotix release (based on Debian Sid) came out in October, 2006. Shortly thereafter, a Kanotix co-developer (and many of Kanotix's other developers) left the project, mainly due to a disagreement over whether Kanotix should be based on Sid (Debian's unstable branch) or something less volatile, like Etch (Debian's current stable branch) or Ubuntu. Kanotix's founder now has a new, Etch-based version of Kanotix in development, code-named "Thorhammer."

Sidux 2007-03.1 "Gaia": A closer look

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Reviews

Unless you're able to deal with such esoteric problems as diagnosing a buggy post-install script, or figuring out how to deal with a major change in the directory structure of X.org, you might occasionally find running a Debian Sid-based system to be more than you can handle. And that's where Sidux comes in. Sidux's goal is to allow mere mortals the ability to run Debian Sid on the desktop, in order to take advantage of the latest Debian software available. Its development team helps guide its users through the occasional bumps in Sid, via IRC and its user forum. Another goal is to offer a consistent release cycle. Sidux comes with a variety of "convenience scripts" and utilities you won't find in Debian proper, that make it easier to do such things as administer your system and install proprietary software.

Slackware 12: The anti-'buntu

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Reviews

Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution; its first version came out in 1993. Version 12 was recently released. As its Wikipedia entry notes, it's got a reputation for sacrificing ease-of-use (in terms of configuration and package management tools provided by the distribution) in favor of letting the end user configure the system and its software by herself.

Alternative GUIs: GoblinX

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Linux

GoblinX is a live Linux distribution based on Slackware 11, written by a Brazillian developer who goes by the pseudonym Grobsch. It comes with five different window managers/GUIs, and uses custom artwork for each of them that's quite unlike anything you've seen before.

Alternative GUIs: SymphonyOS

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Linux

We're all familiar with the "big two" desktops for Linux -- KDE and GNOME. Of course, there are many more to choose from. If you asked a group of Linux users, "Which one is best?", the ensuing debate would likely take on religious overtones. Some would even argue that a desktop like KDE is too hard for newbies to use. Still, it's a safe bet that most Linux users don't stray too far away from those "big two," KDE and GNOME. So it's especially interesting to look at some innovative alternatives.

Fedora 7 "Moonshine": Freedom vs. Ease-of-Use (Part 2)

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Reviews

Part 2 of the Fedora 7 "Moonshine" review.

Fedora 7 "Moonshine": Freedom vs. Ease-of-Use (Part 1)

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Reviews

Fedora 7, a.k.a. "Moonshine," released on May 31, is an odd duck. On the one hand, it's hugely popular. On the other hand, these days, there seems to be an emphasis on being user-friendly (think "Ubuntu"). But Fedora's creators have consciously limited what it can do out of the box.

Blue Belle: Running PCLinuxOS Test 4

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Reviews

PCLinuxOS is an up-and-coming distribution that recently made it into Distrowatch.com's list of Top Ten Distributions. I installed PCLinuxOS Test 4 on a 10 GB partition (with a separate 1 GB /home partition) on an AMD Athlon 2600+ with 640 MB of RAM and an NVIDIA GeForce 6200 LE graphics card. This hardware is no great shakes nowadays, but it's plenty fast enough to run PCLinuxOS with all the bells and whistles.

Linux Mint "Bianca" KDE Edition Beta 020: A Small Review

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Reviews

Linux Mint is an Ubuntu-based distro whose goal in life, per its website, "is to produce an elegant, up to date and comfortable GNU/Linux desktop distribution." The developers have released both GNOME-based and KDE-based versions in the past, and their latest version, v2.2 "Bianca," is already final in its GNOME incarnation.

The Lazy Guide to Installing Knoppix on a USB Key

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Howtos

Knoppix, the famous live Linux CD that practically started the live CD trend, needs no introduction to most people. One of the things that's so great about it is that you can take it with you and boot to a familiar Linux environment on almost any modern computer, without touching the OS that's already installed on it.

Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 2)

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Reviews

In part 1, openSUSE got installed and configured on a Compaq Presario V2000 with an ATI Radeon Xpress 200M PCIE graphics chipset and a 32-bit CPU. Now it's time to go for the bling.

Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 1)

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Reviews

My favorite distro faces an uncertain future, so I decided to install openSUSE 10.2 over it on my Compac Presario V2000. Also because... OK, I'll come clean: the real reason was for the eye candy. I wanted Beryl, with the cube, the wobbly windows, the "magic lantern" window minimizing effects, rain, snow -- you know, Eye Candy.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa 20.2 RC2 and DXVK 1.7.1

  • mesa 20.2.0-rc2
    Hi list,
    
    Available today is mesa 20.2.0-rc2. This is the second release candidate for
    the 20.2 release. Currently our open to close ratio on blocking bugs is looking
    really good. This release is dominated by changes to radeonsi, radv, and aco,
    with a few additional changes sneaking in for freedreno, meson,  etnaviv,
    st/mesa, anv, and a few utility fixes.
    
    Dylan
    
    
  • Mesa 20.2-RC2 Released With Many Fixes For RadeonSI + RADV Drivers

    The second weekly release candidate of the forthcoming Mesa 20.2 is now available for testing. Mesa 20.2 is aiming for release around the end of August or early September depending upon how the bug situation plays out. This quarterly feature release to Mesa3D brings many new Vulkan extensions, the RADV driver using ACO by default, initial support for Navi 2 GPUs, initial support for Intel Rocket Lake and DG1, OpenGL 4.3 for LLVMpipe, and much more as outlined in last week's article.

  • DXVK 1.7.1 Released With Many Game Fixes For Direct3D Over Vulkan

    It's been nearly three months without a new DXVK release for mapping Direct3D 9/10/11 atop the Vulkan API while finally today there is a big feature release out. DXVK 1.7.1 was released a few minutes ago as the first update since May. While the version number isn't significant, this version does have many changes.

  • Direct3D to Vulkan translation layer DXVK 1.7.1 is out, lots of game fixes

    After a few months since 1.7 went out, DXVK 1.7.1 is now live to further improve Direct3D to Vulkan translation. This is the project that helps to power Proton, the compatibility layer for Steam Play. This release adds support for newer Vulkan extensions, fixes bugs and has new GPU driver requirements. On the driver side, the VK_EXT_transform_feedback extension is now required which has been supported in drivers on Linux since late 2018 / early 2019. Specifically you will need at least NVIDIA 415.22 and for AMD / Intel it looks like Mesa 19 covers both.

Devices/Embedded: Raspberry Pi and Android Devices

  • Indoor air quality HAT for Raspberry Pi boasts high-res TVOC sensor

    Avnet’s $49.95 “Renesas ZMOD4410 Indoor Air Quality HAT for Raspberry Pi” can be used to measure volatile organic compounds, humidity, and temperature, as well as estimate carbon dioxide levels. Avnet has launched a Renesas ZMOD4410 Indoor Air Quality HAT for Raspberry Pi (AES-RHSEN-ZM44-G) that joins other indoor air quality measurement add-ons for the Pi including Metriful’s $44.50 Sense module and Pimoroni’s $57 Enviro+ pHAT. The ZMOD4410 HAT lacks some of the extras of those boards, but appears to offer a higher quality total volatile organic compound (TVOC) sensor with its Renesas ZMOD4410, which offers resolution ranging from parts-per-billion to parts-per-million.

  • Tiny module and dev kit run RT Linux on STM32MP1

    Exor’s 25.4 x 25.4mm, extended temp “NanoSOM nS02” module runs real-time Linux and its XPlatform industrial IoT software on a soldered, 800MHz STM32MP157 with up to 1GB DDR3L and 32GB eMMC. An “OpenHMI nS02” dev kit with 5-inch touchscreen is optional. Italian embedded technology firm Exor Embedded has launched a NanoSOM nS02 module that runs real-time Linux on the new 800MHz version of ST’s dual-core, Cortex-A7 based STM32MP157. As with the recent, Apollo Lake based, FPGA-enabled GigaSOM GS01 module, Exor announced the product with Arrow, which will be distributing the module and an OpenHMI nS02 Development Kit (see farther below).

  • Zidoo Z10 Pro & Z9X Realtek RTD1619DR 4K Android Media Players Launched for $229 and up

    We previously wrote about some upcoming Realtek RTD1619 media players targeting the videophone and audiophile crowd, and expected them to launch very soon with models from Zidoo and Dune HD. Zidoo has now launched two models with the awaited Zidoo Z9X and a new, higher-end Zidoo Z10 Pro which can be purchased on Aliexpress for respectively $229 and $349 with free shipping.

  • Snapdragon 626 Powered Rugged Tablet Comes with NFC, RFID and Barcode Readers

    Estone Technology has launched another rugged tablet with UA-80 IP-67 waterproof rated, and MIL-STD-810G compliant rugged Android tablet powered by a Qualcomm Snapdragon 626 mobile platform driving an 8″ capacitive touchscreen display.

Python Programming

  • Announcing the new Jupyter Book

    Jupyter Book is an open source project for building beautiful, publication-quality books, websites, and documents from source material that contains computational content. With this post, we’re happy to announce that Jupyter Book has been re-written from the ground up, making it easier to install, faster to use, and able to create more complex publishing content in your books. It is now supported by the Executable Book Project, an open community that builds open source tools for interactive and executable documents in the Jupyter ecosystem and beyond.

  • Holdgraf: Announcing the new Jupyter Book

    On the Jupyter blog, Chris Holdgraf announces a rewrite of the Jupyter Book project. LWN looked at Jupyter and its interactive notebooks for Python and other languages back in 2018; Jupyter Book extends the notebook idea.

  • EuroPython 2020: Live Stream Recordings available

    We’re happy to announce the public availability of the live stream recordings from EuroPython 2020. They were already available to all conference attendees since the sprint days.

  • Learn Any Programming Language with This Learning Plan

    All it takes to master any programming language is the right learning plan. If you know anything about programming you should be aware that often you can’t tell whether what you are doing is wrong until it’s too late. That’s what makes programming a frustrating skill to master — long hours doing the wrong things. But hey, whether you want to make programming your full-time job or just a hobby, you can always make the learning curve less steep. The secret to getting it right with coding is this: have a learning plan! While the plan will not do the hard lifting for you, it will definitely provide the much-needed elbow grease to keep you grounded and focused as you learn programming.

  • Deploying Django to AWS ECS with Terraform

    In this tutorial, we'll look at how to deploy a Django app to AWS ECS with Terraform.

  • Matt Layman: Rendering Calendars - Building SaaS #68

    In this episode, I worked on rendering a calendar of important events in a school year. We built out the appropriate data structures, and I wrote some new model methods and added tests. On the last stream, I created a new model to track breaks in the school year. The app now shows the calendar for the school year, and I want to display the breaks on the calendar. Before digging too far into the code, I provided my thoughts about using Docker for development from a question that came from the chat.

Software in the Command Line

  • Readability CLI: I Don't Want A GUI Just To Read An Article

    The web is big and bloated and that isn't going to change any time soon so luckily for us some people are working on ways that can take the web and strip out most of the garbage that you don't need to allow people to more easily use it from a terminal web browser or with a screen reader. One such tool is Readability CLI which interacts with Mozilla's Readability Library to bring you a really comfy terminal web viewing experience which works amazingly for reading articles.

  • Rainbow Text, ASCII Art and More: Customize Your Linux Terminal

    The Linux terminal, sometimes referred to as the command line or the “shell” is a simple yet powerful way to interact with the computer. Commands are typed into the terminal, and their output is displayed immediately to the terminal. From the Linux terminal we can create users, make network connections and download files. Despite all of this power, the terminal is not as “friendly” as a modern desktop. How can the terminal be made a little friendlier? By customizing the Linux terminal with rainbows, art and handy information such as CPU temperature, IP address and the latest weather.

  • Best Command Line Music Players For Linux

    List Of The Best Command Line Music Players For Linux Operating Systems What will be more fun than playing music in the terminal or command-line interface in Linux based operating systems?. In this post, we will list out the best command-line music players for Linux based operating systems.