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July 2021

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MySQL data types: Know the ones to use and how

    When creating a table in a database, it should have both a name and a data type. A column’s data type defines the values the column holds, such as integer, money, binary, character, date, and time. Therefore, it is a developer’s task to determine which data types will be stored in each column while creating databases and tables.

    In simple terms, data types are guidelines that aid SQL in understanding what type of data is required inside a column. It is also efficient in identifying how SQL interacts with the stored data.

    A point to note is that data types might contain different names in different databases, and in cases where the names are the same, other aspects and details such as size will differ. Therefore, it is recommended that you always refer to documentation whenever you encounter similar cases.

  • Mozilla VPN Review [Ed: One paragraph before last shows that Mozilla does not actually do VPN; it's a reseller for some dodgy company, reusing the Firefox brand to sell a bunch of crap or upsell (likely bogus privacy or a ticking time bomb)]

    Mozilla VPN protects your privacy, and your subscription fee supports a proponent of a free internet. It's a simple service for anyone who needs a virtual private network, but it offers no bonus privacy tools beyond the VPN.

    [...]

    Mozilla VPN is not, strictly speaking, wholly a Mozilla project like Firefox. Instead of building and maintaining the infrastructure required for a consumer VPN, Mozilla found another company to partner with. During Mozilla's earliest forays into the world of VPNs, Mozilla courted Editors' Choice-winner ProtonVPN.

  • Dealing with burnout in open source [Ed: Sorry, IBM/Red Hat... but burnout is burnout and can happen to anybody, nothing to do with Free software ("open source"); this is as silly as your several articles about breakfasts for "open source people" (as if coding and software licences affect your diet). You've run out of topics. This Web site called Open Source dot com has become a lot of openwashing, IBM marketing and general non-tech articles being painted with the "open" crush to make it seem "tech".]

    Burnout is something you don't expect to happen to you—until it does. The technology industry is one of the worst offenders; over 60% of industry professionals report they've experienced burnout. Sixty percent! Chances are, you or someone you know has dealt with it. How can we tackle such a staggering burnout rate if those who make decisions about mental health barely know what burnout is, never mind how to prevent it?

  • Recently and soon in openSUSE #1

    Today (Saturday 31st of August, 17:00 UTC) is the third installment of the recently rejuvenated Community meetings! Taking place on Jist Meet, it will be an excellent opportunity to discuss and coordinate on solutions for improving things in the Project.

    One important topic will be openSUSE Membership, soon to be affected by the shutdown of connect-o-o.

  • Instructions: Cut videos with Kdenlive on Linux and Windows [Ed: Automated translation]

    A small clip for social media, a YouTube video about the last big trip, the hobby or even short film projects: the open source software Kdenlive is a versatile video editor that can be used to create very different videos. Getting started is pleasantly easy And if you want, you can also build small animations, add a subtitle track to the video and render it in the appropriate format for the desired publication platform.

    Lots of effects and transitions provide variety, a library saves clips that are used frequently so that they are quickly available in all projects. Generators produce clips with a countdown, white noise, or a test pattern. The Kdenlive user interface can be adjusted in detail so that everything goes quickly when editing video.

  • My Work on Documentation (June/July)

    After two month in documentation I can tell you this: documentation in general is quite alive and kicking. Smile From the outside you might see outdated content here and there, but there are quite a few people working on improving that. Of course, as most things, it is a never-ending effort and every helping hand is appreciated. If you are interested in helping, please talk to us on our mailing list. One of the more time-consuming tasks is currently porting documentation from TechBase to the new Developer Portal. It's basically copy&paste with some adjustments, so volunteers welcome Smile

    For me the time flew by blazingly fast. In the beginning ... there was Akademy, the first conference for me. It meant getting up at 7 to go to work, joining Akademy when I came back home and staying up till midnight or longer for the last talks or events to finish. Processing and carving out the outcome of the three documentation BoF sessions is still on my todo list.

    In the time before and since Akademy, I have been busy reading through several years of documentation improvement planning backlog and fixing lots of smaller issues in existing docs in the wikis and on the new Developer Portal. This also included cleaning up some outdated content (EBN has been decommissioned) and proofreading other people's documentation-related merge requests when asked to do so.

    Unfortunately, my first contribution to one of the website's Git repositories is still unmerged at the time of writing. I blame me for that not keeping track of my own merge requests. But it also shows one of the things we need to put more effort into: closing merge requests (one way or another). Also, check your own merge requests once in a while.

  • You can get Delver, Tower of Time and more in the Humble RPG Heroes Bundle | GamingOnLinux

    It seems Humble Bundle are starting to ramp-up their game bundles again and they have another with the Humble RPG Heroes Bundle that has some great games inside.

    The bundle is on the smaller side though but even so, what's there seems like a pretty good deal overall with some real indie gems included.

  • Using FSR To Boost Any Game’s Framerate on Linux

    Ever heard of the little war between AMD and Nvidia regarding upscaling technologies? Nvidia has DLSS (Deep Learning Super Sampling) and AMD has recently released FSR (FidelityFX Super Resolution).

    [...]

    On Linux, we have an extra opportunity to use FSR, without asking anyone to do anything. Proton already has a full screen hack upscaler included, which prevents Windows games from trying to change the current screen’s resolution. This hack instead uses a software upscaler pretending the resolution change is happening while remaining at the native monitor’s resolution. If an old game uses 800×600 as maximum resolution, the upscaler will fill your 1920×1080 screen by scaling up that tiny picture so that it fits in the larger monitor screen.

    Some folks have had the genius idea to simply replace the basic upscaler included in Proton by… AMD’s FSR! It makes it work out of the work on any game that uses Vulkan through ProtonGE – a benefit that Windows gamers can’t get for now!

    Of course, this is NOT how you are supposed to use FSR: ideally you want to apply FSR on a picture before the HUD and the post processing is applied, but still, it’s an acceptable usage of the upscaler, and provide massive performance boosts. You can see the video I published earlier today for Max Payne 3 and how much boost I can get from a meager Nvidia GTX 1060 3GB (with 470.x drivers), without much visual information loss (Using Proton-6.13-GE-1).

  • How microservices and containers work, apart and together

    CMicroservices and containers are two methods that enable companies to more efficiently create and deliver applications. Here's how they work -- and when they're best used together.

    Containers and microservices are related concepts that help companies design and adopt applications with speed, efficiency and flexibility. It's hard to talk about one without also talking about the other. Microservices and containers are distinct technologies -- they don't have to be used together, but they often are. Let's break down how each works, their key similarities and differences, and how an enterprise can use them in tandem.

    What are microservices?

    Microservices are individual units of software that combine to provide all of the functions required to run an application. Typically, each microservice handles a discrete type of functionality within an application. For example, one microservice handles logins, another generates the UI, another populates the interface with content specific to each user session and yet another interfaces with the database that stores user data.

    Until about 2010, most applications were monolithic designs in which the entire application ran as a single unit and, in most cases, as a single process. Prior to wide adoption of the internet and APIs, a service-oriented architecture (SOA) approach evolved to break applications into somewhat smaller pieces. However, the individual services within an SOA are typically not as small or dynamic as microservices.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in July 2021

    One of the original promises of open source software is that distributed peer review and transparency of process results in enhanced end-user security. However, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free and open source software for malicious flaws, almost all software today is distributed as pre-compiled binaries. This allows nefarious third parties to compromise systems by injecting malicious code into ostensibly secure software during the various compilation and distribution processes. The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

    [...]

    As part of my role of being the assistant Secretary of the Open Source Initiative and a board director of Software in the Public Interest I attended their respective monthly meetings. As outlined in last months posts, however, my term on the OSI board has been slightly extended due to the discovery of a vulnerability in OSI's recent election — as a result, the 2021 election is currently being re-run.

  • Aaron Portnoy – ‘There’s no silver bullet for ransomware or supply chain attacks’ [Ed: When you receive packages from Microsoft/GitHub/NPM you're basically begging for malware. Not just PRISM; Microsoft literally brings people from the NSA to run GitHub/NPM.]
  • This Week In Security: Fail2RCE, TPM Sniffing, Fishy Leaks, And Decompiling | Hackaday

    Fail2ban is a great tool for dynamically blocking IP addresses that show bad behavior, like making repeated login attempts. It was just announced that a vulnerability could allow an attacker to take over a machine by being blocked by Fail2ban. The problem is in the mail-whois action, where an email is sent to the administrator containing the whois information. Whois information is potentially attacker controlled data, and Fail2ban doesn’t properly sterilize the input before piping it into the mail binary. Mailutils has a feature that uses the tilde key as an escape sequence, allowing commands to be run while composing a message. Fail2ban doesn’t sanitize those tilde commands, so malicious whois data can trivially run commands on the system. Whois is one of the old-school unix protocols that runs in the clear, so a MItM attack makes this particularly easy. If you use Fail2ban, make sure to update to 0.10.7 or 0.11.3, or purge any use of mail-whois from your active configs.

  • Ransomware Changes: DoppelPaymer Rebrands; Babuk Evolves

    One example is the DoppelPaymer - aka DopplePaymer - ransomware-as-a-service operation, which has gone relatively quiet since early May, posting no victims to its data leak site since May 6 and no leaked files since June 25. But one expert says the operation appears to have been rebranded by its operator, Evil Corp, in an attempt to avoid sanctions imposed on the crime group in December 2019 by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control.

    The Babuk ransomware operation also recently appears to have altered its approach - if not splintered - following its late-April ransomware attack against the Metropolitan Police Department of Washington, D.C.

  • The Week in Ransomware - July 30th 2021 - €1 billion saved

    We also saw ransomware groups continue to innovate with LockBit 2.0 now using group policies to automate the deployment of their ransomware over a Windows domain.

    I shared what I know about the inner conflict of the Babuk ransomware gang...

  • Secure applications with Keycloak authentication tool [Ed: Is this journalism or "sales"?]

Top 50 HD wallpaper packs for your Linux PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As a matter of fact, a suitable wallpaper is a motivation factor that can cheer you up while working on your machine. Any image based on your love’s cool colors can soothe and stimulate your senses while working, thus maintaining your activeness on your machine. This, therefore, means that selecting an appropriate wallpaper is super necessary as it plays a significant psychological role.

Before looking at some of the best 50 HD wallpapers we have for you, let us first show you how you can easily change your desktop wallpaper without any issues. To have any of these wallpapers on your Linux computer, all you have to do is follow the steps below, and you will be good to go.

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Which Linux Desktop Should You Use? KDE vs. GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

One of the first things you learn about Linux is that what you see on your screen doesn't always match what you see on someone else's. The interface, the way you interact with your PC, is often completely different even though you're both using the same operating system.

Windows and macOS both have one interface or desktop environment. Linux has many, and two of the most popular are KDE and GNOME. But how do you choose between them?

Read more

Unlock the Chromecast with Google TV bootloader to run LineageOS or Ubuntu (older models only)

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

The $50 Chromecast with Google TV is a dongle that hangs from the HDMI port of a TV, allowing you to stream video, listen to music, or play games using Google’s software.

Want to use it for something more? A team of developers have just released a method for unlocking the bootloader. That makes it possible to replace Google’s software with alternate operating systems such as the open source, Android-based LineageOS or even a GNU/Linux distribution like Ubuntu. But before you get too excited, you should know that the bootloader can only be unlocked on some Chromecast units.

Read more

Deepin vs. Ubuntu – which Linux distro is for you?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Deepin Linux, a.k.a Deepin OS, is widely regarded as the most beautiful-looking Linux distro out there. In fact, it can even give proprietary OSes like Windows and macOS a run for their money in terms of looks and aesthetics. Furthermore, the distro’s focus on stability and ease of use gives Linux newcomers all the more reasons to fall in love with Deepin OS.

Now, on the flip side, we have Ubuntu – a distro so popular that its name is synonymous with Linux to the outside world. Ubuntu is backed by a massive community, has access to almost all the major Linux software, and gives users a complete ready-to-use desktop experience right out of the box. This is why it’s our top pick for the best Linux distro for beginners.

And this brings us to the question of the hour – which is the better distro? Deepin or Ubuntu? To answer that, we have put together a detailed overview giving you an in-depth look at the major differences between the two distros. By the end, you should have a clear idea of which Linux distro is best for your needs and requirements.

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Where to Learn Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you’re new to Linux or if you just want to learn more about Linux and improve your professional skills, you might be wondering where to learn Linux. This article will help you.

There are many options to choose from, ranging from written content to video tutorials and audiobooks. Each category with its own different choices. We’ll go through each one of them and guide you through all the options of where to learn Linux.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • What Does ‐‐ (double dash) Mean In SSH Shell Command?
  • How To Install Craft CMS on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Craft CMS on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Craft CMS is a free and open-source content management system written in PHP and based on the Yii framework. It is very popular due to its performance and full control of CMS. It is a secure and scalable CMS and comes with a lot of plugins that help you to customize your website easily.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the Craft content management system on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • My website now shows an icon next to all external links | Hund

    My website now shows an icon next to all external links. I thought it would be a good idea on a website like mine, where there’s a lot of links to both internal and external sources.

  • How To Install ArangoDB on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install ArangoDB on CentOS 8. For those of you who didn’t know, ArangoDB is an open-source NoSQL database manager and provides all the database features that are needed for a modern web application. ArangoDB does not use the traditional data storage system as in MySQL or PostgreSQL. It is specially designed for being high-performance, open-source, and easily scalable.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the ArangoDB NoSQL database on a CentOS 8.

  • How to Install Linux Mint Apps (Hypnotix, Webapp-Manager, etc) via PPA in Ubuntu | UbuntuHandbook

    The Linux Mint team introduced many great new apps in recent releases. And now an Ubuntu PPA is available that contains these apps for all current Ubuntu releases.

    Without adding Linux Mint repository and setting the priority, an Ubuntu PPA is good choice to install or receive the package updates.

    And ‘Butterfly’, a top contributor of Linux Mint project on launchpad, maintains the PPA repository with packages so far for Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 21.04, and Ubuntu 21.10 support.

  • DHCPv6 prefix delegation with systemd-networkd | Major Hayden's Blog

    My home internet comes from Spectrum (formerly Time Warner Cable) and they offer IPv6 addresses for cable modem subscribers. One of the handy features they provide is DHCPv6 prefix delegation.

  • How to install your own WireGuard Server in under five minutes

    Whether you want to hide your identity from prying eyes or access content blocked by geo-restrictions, running a WireGuard server is an excellent solution to run your own VPN server.

  • How to install HAProxy on FreeBSD - Unixcop

    HAProxy, as is name suggest, is a proxy server and a load balancer for provide high availability. In this article first I will show how to install HAProxy in FreeBSD. Next we will set up to act as a reverse proxy.

  • What Is Podman And How To Install Podman In Linux - OSTechNix

    This guide explains what is Podman, its features, difference between a Podman container and an image, and how to install Podman in Linux operating systems.

  • How to Create a Linux VPS Server on Kamatera

    his article is going to explain how to create a Linux VPS (Virtual Private Server) on Kamatera, so you can run your own email server and website.

    ScalaHosting vs Kamatera

    In a previous tutorial, I explained how to create a Linux VPS server on Scalahosting, which is my recommended hosting provider for running email servers, because it has the best IP reputation. However, Scalahosting plans start at $26/month (2 CPUs, 8GB RAM). It’s a bit expensive for some folks since they don’t need that much RAM to get started.

    If your business depends on email, I still recommend ScalaHosting, because it will you better email deliverability. If you are short of money, then you can choose Kamatera VPS hosting, which starts at $4/month (1 CPU, 1GB RAM) and you will get one month for free.

    I have email servers on both hosting providers and I will share my experience in Kamatera with you.

  • January 25 - Day 1 - Raspberry Pi Cross Compilation Toolset | mddionline.com

    Today’s discussion will focus on building a Linux environment that will support the Raspberry Pi 4B C language cross-compilation process.

  • 7 Tips to Customize the Look of Your Linux Terminal

    The terminal emulator plays an integral part in a Linux system, and many users like to change its theme for a customized presentation. Users prefer a quick makeover within their Linux distribution. With a few tweaks, you can change the entire appearance of the terminal window.

    Since you spend most of your time within the terminal, why not make it look like what you prefer. The graphical user interface (GUI) does not need any special commands for customization, so a quick reference guide like this should serve you well.

    Check out the following tips for a quick, seamless transition from your old dull and drab terminal to a customized, rustic look.

  • Scheduling tasks with systemd timers on Linux | FOSS Linux

    Systemd is a service and system manager comprised of a collection of tools to perform different system tasks. One such tool is systemd timers, whose primary purpose is to schedule and run tasks during startup or repeatedly after a system boot.

    Systemd timers are an alternative to the scheduler cron or anacron. For sysadmins, scheduling tasks play a crucial role in automating your system’s boring or difficult tasks. This article is an introductory guide to system timers, their structure, and configurations with real-world examples.

  • A Rolling Release Debian? Install The "Unstable" Branch!

    Debian has three different branches: (1) stable, (2) testing and (3) unstable. The unstable branch "Sid" is a rolling release distribution similar to something like Arch Linux. You get the latest and greatest packages, unlike the standard "stable" edition of Debian, which can have very old packages.

Kernel: Linux 5.14, Linux 5.15, FWUPD 1.5.12 and More

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.14 Drops Old DEC Alpha-Specific Binary Loader Used For x86 Binary Emulation - Phoronix

    As a weekend blast from the past, the Linux 5.14 kernel saw some Alpha CPU architecture updates -- including various fixes and the removal of an Alpha-specific binary loader for running a decades dated x86 software emulator.

    While past the merge window, the Linux 5.14 code this week has dropped "binfmt_em86" from the kernel. This is an Alpha binary loader for Linux focused on running i386/i486 binaries via the EM86 emulator in user-space. This was part of the effort for allowing Intel Linux x86 binaries back in the day to run on DEC Alpha hardware.

  • The New NTFS Driver Looks Like It Will Finally Be Ready With Linux 5.15 - Phoronix

    It's looking like the new NTFS file-system kernel driver developed by Paragon Software and over the past year revised more than two dozen times could be ready for mainlining in the kernel in about one month's time when the Linux 5.15 merge window opens. Everything is finally aligning and looking like the code is in good enough shape for its initial merging though not necessarily replacing the existing NTFS driver at this point.

  • Linux Changes Pipe Behavior After Breaking Problematic Android Apps On Recent Kernels - Phoronix

    At the end of 2019 a rework to the Linux kernel's pipe code saw some of its logic reworked to only wake up readers if needed and avoid a possible thundering herd problem. But it turns out some Android libraries abused the functionality and this has led to broken Android applications when moving to recent kernels. While the user-space software is in the wrong, the kernel is sticking to its policy of not breaking user-space and as such Linus Torvalds has changed the code's behavior for Linux 5.14 and to be back-ported to prior stable kernels.

    Rather than only waking up readers if needed, the change merged into the Linux kernel on Friday will make pipe writes always wake up readers. Due to some Android libraries like Realm misusing the EPOLL interface, the pipe change at the end of 2019 ended up breaking some Android apps.

  • Linux's FWUPD Expands Poly High-End Web Camera Support - Phoronix

    For those looking to purchase a high-end Linux-friendly web camera for your home office or other environment, there are a few more options now compatible with Linux's fwupd if interested in having the capability of updating the camera firmware under Linux.

    FWUPD has had support for updating firmware on the Poly Studio P30 web camera while now it's been expanded to handle additional Poly web cameras. This expanded Poly support can be found with the new FWUPD 1.5.12 release.

  • More RT Code Out For Review, RT Patches Updated Against Linux 5.14 - Phoronix

    The real-time (RT) patches for the Linux kernel still appear a ways off from mainline but at least there is movement on this important patch series for embedded and other use-cases needing real-time support.

    While mainlining the long out-of-tree Linux "RT" patches has been brought up many times in recent years, earlier this year the developers noted the mainlining has been held up by a lack of funding in getting the patches across the finish line. The PREEMPT_RT "development and maintenance is currently stalled" at least as was the case earlier this year but does seem to be loosening up a bit now.

5 Popular Free And Open Source Project Management Tools

Filed under
Software

Managing a project of any type is not an easy task. It involves resources planning, task assignment, following schedules and assuring everyone sticks to the deadline. Remote work became much more interesting after the COVID-19 crisis, which made it hard for project managers to coordinate and manage team members all over the world.

This is why project management tools are essential in 2021.

Several open source project management tools have matured enough to be able to compete with proprietary software. Being fully customizable and supported by the community is an important feature in open source PM tools since every project is unique in its core, and both the projects manager and his tools should be as adaptive as possible to avoid failure.

Today, we’ll check some of the best open source project management programs in the market.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt/Misinformation

today's howtos

  • How to Install Linux Malware Detect (Maldet) on Fedora 34 - LinuxCapable

    Linux Malware Detect (LMD), also known as Maldet, is a malware scanner for Linux released under the GNU GPLv2 license. Maldet is quite popular amongst sysadmins and website devs due to its focus on the detection of PHP backdoors, dark mailers, and many other malicious files that can be uploaded on a compromised website using threat data from network edge intrusion detection systems to extract malware that is actively being used in attacks and generates signatures for detection.

  • How to Install Podman on Debian 11

    Developed by RedHat, Podman is a free and open-source daemonless container engine designed to be a drop-in replacement for the popular Docker runtime engine. Just like Docker, it makes it easy to build, run, deploy and share applications using container images and OCI containers ( Open Container Initiative ). Podman uses user and network namespaces and In comparison to Docker, Podman is considered more isolated and secure. Most commands in Docker will work in Podman. and so if you are familiar with running Docker commands, using podman will be such a breeze.

  • How to Install ArangoDB on Ubuntu Linux

    Every good application requires a database management system to match. As we know there are many of them and in many different categories. Today we will talk about how to install ArangoDB on Linux. In a nutshell, ArangoDB is an open-source NoSQL database system, and it is easily administered via the integrated web interface or the command-line interface.

  • How to Install Java 17 LTS (JDK 17) on Ubuntu 20.04 - LinuxCapable

    Java is a general-purpose, class-based, object-oriented multipurpose programming language that is popular due to the design of having lesser implementation dependencies, meaning that the compiled Java code can be run on all platforms that support Java without the need for recompilation. Java is also fast, secure, and reliable, therefore. It is widely used for developing Java applications in laptops, data centers, game consoles, scientific supercomputers, cell phones, etc. JDK 17 (JDK 17) has brought forward new language enhancements, updates to the libraries, support for new Apple computers, removals and deprecations of legacy features, and work to ensure Java code written today will continue working without change in future JDK versions. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install the latest Java 17 (JDK 17) on Ubuntu 20.04.

Astro Pi 2: New Raspberry Pi hardware with updated camera, sensors to head to the ISS this year

Good news for earthbound Pi-tinkerers hoping to get their code into orbit: a follow-up to 2015's Astro Pi is due to head to the International Space Station (ISS) this year. Time has moved on a bit since the Principia mission of Tim Peake where the first units were installed aboard the orbiting outpost. While over 54,000 participants from 26 countries have since had code run on the hardware, the kit has fallen somewhat behind what is available on Earth. To that end, some new units are due to be launched, replete with updated hardware. In this case, heading to orbit will be Raspberry Pi 4 Model B units with 8GB RAM, the Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera (a 12.3MP device) and the usual complement of gyroscope, accelerometer, magnetometer, humidity, temperature and pressure sensors for users to code against. Read more Also: Tracking Maximum Power Point For Solar Efficiency | Hackaday

pgAdmin 4 v5.7, More PostgreSQL News, and SQLite Linux Tutorial for Beginners

  • PostgreSQL: pgAdmin 4 v5.7 Released

    The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 5.7. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 26 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes. pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website.

  • PostgreSQL Weekly News - September 19, 2021

    Pgpool-II 4.2.5, a connection pooler and statement replication system for PostgreSQL, released Database Lab 2.5, a tool for fast cloning of large PostgreSQL databases to build non-production environments, released. pgexporter 0.1.0, a Prometheus exporter for PostgreSQL, released

  • SQLite Linux Tutorial for Beginners

    This SQLite Linux tutorial is intended for beginners who wish to learn how to get started with SQLite database. SQLite is one of the world’s most widely-used Database programs. So, what is a Database, and what is SQLite?