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January 2021

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, This Week in Linux, Firenvim

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Linux Action News 174

    Google removes Matrix chat-client Element from the Play store, sudo has a major flaw with a long-tail, and Rocky Linux gets a boost.

  • This Week in Linux 136: Linux Sudo Bug, KDE Plasma 5.21, Tails OS, Firefox 85, Ubuntu + Wayland | This Week in Linux - TuxDigital

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’re going to talk about the pretty nasty bug discovered in the Sudo tool which has been named “Baron Samedit”. We’ve got some distro news to discuss for Ubuntu 21.04 and Tails OS. Then we’ll check out some news in the desktop environment space from KDE Plasma and CDE, the Common Desktop Environment of all things. In App news, we’ll check out the latest releases of Mozilla Firefox, Xfce’s Thunar file manager and another browser called qutebrowser. Cute with a “Q” naturally. We’ll take a look at the excite plans UBports has for Ubuntu Touch in 2021. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Firenvim: Embed Neovim Into Every Textbox - YouTube

    Vim emulation is tolerable but I'll always take full vim instead and that's where Firenvim comes in, this let's us embed neovim into our Firefox or Chromium and turn every single text box we see into a full instance of neovim with all your configurations included.

hRPC and why we moved away from gRPC

Filed under
Software

gRPC has a very, very big flaw for publically facing services: streams play awfully with reverse proxies like nginx, as they're essentially HTTP2 requests that aren't closed. This causes proxies to be like “hmmm this is a slow loris attack, time to yeet this stream.” For our homeserver at https://harmonyapp.io, this means we had to configure nginx to be ok with requests taking an entire hour. Any streams would always terminate at exactly 60 minutes. To be fair to gRPC, there's a dedicated HTTP2 streams thing being worked on that would allow reverse proxies like nginx to play nice with it, but unfortunately that's not the case now.

Besides that, gRPC's client libraries, while widely available, range from mediocre to [ censored ] awful. gRPC is a Google product that isn't Go, which means that “error handling” is not a word in its dictionary. This has really bad implications for the C++/Qt client, Challah. Essentially, if anything goes marginally wrong, the client just straight up aborts. There is no way for us to gracefully recover from any errors that originate from the gRPC library. This is terrible for the user experience, as we can't even show a “something is going wrong” page. This is one of the big reasons we're moving away from gRPC: we cannot have our only desktop client be crashing on anything slightly less than perfect network conditions.

That wouldn't be a problem, if making our own implementation of gRPC was easy. Unfortunately, it's not. Remember the part where I said it used low-level HTTP2 a lot? Yeah, that gets very complicated very fast.

Read more

Linux 5.11-rc6

Filed under
Linux

Things look a little calmer than last week, and over-all very average
for rc6. So - like always this late in the release schedule - I'd
certainly have liked things to be even calmer, but nothing here really
stands out.

The diffstat is quite flat, meaning lots of small fixes, with the
exception of one new LED driver, and a flurry of PI futex fixes (and
one nouveau patch that is just a lot of trivial lines).

And all the stats look normal: average number of commits, and they are
all in the usual places, with most of the patch being drivers (gpu,
networking, sound, etc), but we obviously have all the usual suspects
with arch updates, and a smattering of fixes to core code (kernel, mm,
networking, filesystems).

A few known issues still, hopefully soon fixed, and on the whole
things look quite normal apart from some mailing list hiccups..

Go test,

                   Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.11-rc6 Released With Itanium Support Now Orphaned

GNU libredwg-0.12.1 released

Filed under
GNU

LibreDWG version 0.12.1 - 2021/01/31 - beta:
Major bugfixes:
* fixed dwg_bmp() and dwgbmp for >= r2004. Wrong dat offset.
* Fixed EED with code 3 for layer handles. (Fixes GH #310, shanzhugit)
* Fixed bit_convert_TU utf8 conversion with ubsan, wrong endian-ness.
Various fuzzing errors detected and fuzzed by Chew Kin Zhong (See GH #304):
* Fix possible null-deref with broken DWG's in dwg_get_first_object.
* Fix possible null-deref with broken DWG's in dwg_find_class with empty
CLASS.dxfname. (GH #309)
* Fix possible null-deref with broken DWG's in dwglayers with empty
LAYER.name. (GH #308)
* Fix short integer overflow in EED checks when decoding malcrafted DWG's,
which also led to encode buffer overflows. (GH #307)
* Fix possible null-derefs with broken DWG's in json export. (GH #306)
* Fix possible null-deref with broken DWG's in dwg_next_entity iterator. (GH #305)
* Fix wrong TFF overflow check for static strings, where we cannot set
the string nor the size. (GH #304)
* Fix heap-overflows and invalid free's when decoding broken 3DSOLID's
in malcrafted DWG's. Only accept version 1 and 2. (GH #304)
Minor features:
* Added string converters with known TU sizes: bit_TU_to_utf8_len, bit_read_TU_len.

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Snaps Are Quite Fantastic, For Some Use Cases

Filed under
Ubuntu

75% of users are still depending on traditional package mangers (APT, DNF… etc) instead of using Snaps or Flatpaks, but this is gradually starting to change, as larger organizations and development communities start to use the latter instead of the former.

Some people like Snaps, some people hate them, which is fine, just like most things in life. However, it is important to balance this love-hate relationship in order to not be biased toward a certain direction, ignoring the other.

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Explore the Best Linux Tools for Web Developer

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

Web development is reaching a new high with each passing year with various tools at disposal for web developers. These tools have helped developers develop powerful and popular modern-day web applications like Amazon Prime, Netflix, and AirBnB. End products like these have increased expectations from web developers.

Web development tools can be divided into different categories such as code/text editors, web application frameworks, front-end frameworks, API and testing clouds tools, and web design tools.

Hence, every web developer must have the right web development tools in his toolbox. In this article, we’re going to look at the best Linux tools for web developers.

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Conky system monitor- Widget to view Linux Process, CPU and Memory

Filed under
Software

Conky system monitor is a simple but advanced application to install on a Linux system for getting a Desktop widget with details of the system process, Memory consumption, CPU load, and more…

Users who have shifted from Windows to Linux platforms will always have some Task Manager in the form of a system monitor, however, as we know Linux platforms are full of possibilities, thus you will love Conky. It is a small lightweight and highly configurable Linux system monitor that can show all information in one place in a beautiful widget.

Although running the Conky system monitor is not difficult, the configuration would be easy especially for beginners, but with a little training you can create very nice “system monitors”.

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Taiwins 0.2.9 is out

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Hi folks,

I would like to announce an 0.2.9 release of Taiwins project. Back in
September 2020, I released the 0.2 version of Taiwins, which was utilising
wlroots for backend handling. I have gone on implementing backend logics
and Laid out most of the ground work. Now Taiwins has a new release and
libtaiwins is releasing with it. Libtaiwins is another alternative to
libweston and wlroots, but GPL licensed. It handles the output and input
devices and offers rendering context for compositing. I implemented some
interesting features like gpu hotplug, and in the future, we will have
vulkan renderer as well.

Apparently I am shamelessly advertising Taiwins here for potential
interested users and developers. But I guess I didn't do a very good job
last time since I am the only developer now. As one man, I think it is as
much as I can push the project right now. I sort have to thank the pandemic
otherwise I would never be able to have this much developing time. This
time, I drafted a feature list [1] of Taiwins for those who are interested.
We also have a Gitter channel if you have any questions. I am sure you will
find tawins is an interesting an unique project.

Cheers to the new year.

Regards,
Xichen

Read more

Also: Taiwins Wayland Compositor Switches From WLROOTS To Its Own Library - Phoronix

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Elasticsearch Create Alias – Linux Hint

    Since you are reading a tutorial about Elasticsearch index, the chances are high that I don’t need to dive deep into what Elastisearch is, but a brief reminder will do you no harm.

  • How to Create an ELK Docker Image and Create a Docker Container – Linux Hint

    Docker is one of the best technologies for virtualization and isolated environments for building applications.

    This tutorial will show you how to create a Docker image that integrates Elasticsearch, Kibana, and Logstash. You can then use the image to deploy the ELK stack on any Docker container.

  • How to install Atom text editor on Linux Mint 20.1 - YouTube [Ed: Microsoft owned now, so better to avoid]

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Atom text editor on Linux Mint 20.1.

  • How to Create Elasticsearch Indices – Linux Hint

    Elasticsearch is one part of the popular ELK stack used for log analytics and search. Applications and systems are constantly logging data that can be very useful for troubleshooting and tracking problems. Using the ELK stack, you have the best tools to perform these tasks quickly and very easily.

  • How run Android apps on linux without emulation

    There is a Linux tool that makes it easier for Android applications to run on the open source operating system. Anbox utility is a tool that acts like a bridge between Linux and Android. In this article you will learn how to install and use Android apps on Linux using Anbox.

  • How to play Human: Fall Flat on Linux

    Human: Fall Flat is a platformer puzzle game developed by No Brakes Games and published by Curve Digital. In the game, the player must solve physics-based puzzle games with their character. In this guide, we’ll show you how to play the game on Linux.

  • Monitor Linux Servers with Grafana and Prometheus (node_exporter)

    We are going to install node_exporter and configure Prometheus to monitor Linux servers.

    The node_exporter service is a Prometheus exporter for hardware and OS metrics exposed by Linux kernels.

  • Backup and Restore Elasticsearch Clusters with Snapshots – Linux Hint

    Elasticsearch is all about data, and as you probably already know, data is important—to you and Elasticsearch. However, in as much as both you and Elasticsearch love data, data failures may occur, leading to data loss.

    To help safeguard against data loss, Elasticsearch has various features that allow you to ensure data availability, even in data failure instances.

  • How to Configure An Elasticsearch Index Templates – Linux Hint

    Indices are an essential Elasticsearch feature without which it would probably not function as it does. Although Elasticsearch indices may vary depending on intended use, they tend to share common properties. Given this, it can be tiresome to create similar properties for all indices. Instead, it is much more efficient to create a template we can refer to when creating an index.

    This tutorial will walk you through the ins and outs of Elasticsearch index templates that allow you to define templates or blueprints for common indices. For example, if you are constantly logging data from external sources, you can define a blueprint for all logging indices.

  • How to Install GitScrum in Debian 10 – Linux Hint

    GitScrum is a free, open-source task management tool that you can use to manage projects with ease. GitScrum uses the famous Git platform and Scrum software methodology to allow for more effective team management. This software helps users to track time consumed to perform various tasks and keep a record of projects that users are working on. Users can create multiple projects, keep a record of projects assigned to different users, and even chat in real-time. This article shows you how to install GitScrum in Debian 10.

  • How to indent a source code block in VIM? | LibreByte

    VIM is a powerful editor with a rich ecosystem and many many features it's used by many users around the world in their daily administrations and development tasks.

    This tip is very useful if you want to use VIM (mainly) as your source code editor.

  • Useful Mount Options of the Btrfs Filesystem – Linux Hint

    Like any other filesystems, the Btrfs filesystem also has a lot of mount options that you can use to configure the Btrfs filesystem’s behavior while mounting the filesystem.

    This article will show you how to mount a Btrfs filesystem with your desired mount options. I will explain some of the useful Btrfs mount options as well. So, let’s get started.

  • How to Install JetBrains IntelliJ in Debian – Linux Hint

    JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA is a popular environment for application development. IntelliJ IDEA was developed by JetBrains. JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA contains several built-in tools, including auto code completion, database integration, terminal, inline debugger, and more. The core packages of IntelliJ IDEA support the Groovy, Java, XML, and Kotlin languages. You can also install various plugins to support other programming languages, such as Perl, Python, and Go.

    This article provides a guide for installing JetBrains IntelliJ IDE on your Debian 10 system.

  • How to mount an exFAT drive on Linux

    exFAT is a proprietary filesystem developed by Microsoft, which has been primarily used in Windows and many existing SD cards or USB drives. Compared to FAT32, exFAT offers many improvements in terms of file size limit (significant higher than FAT32's 4GB limit), maximum disk size, maximum number of files, disk allocation performance, timestamp granularity, file name length, etc. Because of these enhancements and good compatibility with Windows and MacOS, exFAT has been used as a default filesystem for many existing high-capacity SD cards (e.g., SDXC) or USB flash drives.

  • How to Install YOURLS on Ubuntu with Nginx and Let’s Encrypt

    In this tutorial, we’re going to show you how to install YOURLS on an Ubuntu 20.04 server with Nginx, MariaDB, PHP, and Let’s Encrypt.

  • How to install Eclipse IDE for Java Developers on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Eclipse IDE for Java Developers on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • Gentoo Linux Installation Tutorial – Linux Hint

    The installation procedure for Gentoo involves more steps than other distributions. This is intentional so you can control the steps in a more clear way. Using this strategy, you can get started with less than 4GiB of disk and memory of down to 256MiB, 512MiB if you want to use the liveDVD. You also have the opportunity to tweak your system to be as efficient as you can make it. Your first try will be slower if you are not well versed in Linux and all the intricate details, but you can end up with a very lean system.

  • How to Encrypt a Btrfs Filesystem? – Linux Hint

    The Btrfs filesystem-level encryption feature is still not available. But you can use a 3rd party encryption tool like dm-crypt to encrypt the entire storage devices of your Btrfs filesystem.

    In this article, I am going to show you how to encrypt the storage devices added to a Btrfs filesystem with dm-crypt. So, let’s get started.

  • How to Use GameConqueror Cheat Engine in Linux – Linux Hint

    The article covers a guide about using the GameConqueror cheat engine in Linux. Many users who play games on Windows often use the “Cheat Engine” application to modify game parameters and player attributes to enhance the gameplay experience, get over unnecessary grinding, complete speedruns and so on. The Cheat Engine application is not available for Linux, however, another application called “GameConqueror” based on the same concept and features is available for Linux distributions. While GameConqueror is not as advanced as Cheat Engine, it gets the job done and it is the only Cheat Engine for Linux with an easy to use interface.

  • The simplest way to edit PDF files in Linux

    PDF stands for Portable Document Format which is widely used among general users for documentation purpose and its usage is primarily for printing, sharing and for large documents.

    By default, all Linux distributions comes with a PDF viewer, but not ideally with PDF editor like Adobe Acrobat.

    To edit PDF’s, LibreOffice Draw can be used as basic PDF editor which is readily available with most of the Linux distributions, as part of the LibreOffice suite.

    LibreOffice Draw may not be a full-fledged PDF editor but definitely an editor to fulfill our basic requirements with some limitations.

  • How to become a ‘root user’ in Linux?

    root user is a privileged user in Linux, which is similar to an administrator in Windows.

    All kind of administrative operations can be performed using root user privilege hence it is not advisable to provide root access to anyone who does not have much familiarity with Linux environment, which might cause adverse impact on the system.

  • Running PhantomJS in Vagrant

    Some time ago I came across a weird error when trying to run RSpec test suite involving PhantomJS in Vagrant. Here’s the solution.

  • Solving vagrant up's name of domain about to create is already taken

    Creating and destroying virtual machines in Vagrant left and right might get us in trouble. If we reuse the domain name, Vagrant will fail to create it again. Here is how to use virsh if Vagrant won’t help anymore.

Kid3 Audio Tag Editor 3.8.5 Released, How to Install via Ubuntu PPA

Filed under
KDE
Software

The Kid3 audio tagger 3.8.5 was released today as a new bug-fix release which however includes also some minor new features.

Kid3 3.8.5 adds ability to change the language via Settings -> Appearance, though app needs a restart to apply change.

It also brings “Invert Selection” option under Edit menu, command option “config” to query and set configuration options, and script to rewrite all tags of the selected files.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Announcement : An AArch64 (Arm64) Darwin port is planned for GCC12

    As many of you know, Apple has now released an AArch64-based version of macOS and desktop/laptop platforms using the ‘M1’ chip to support it. This is in addition to the existing iOS mobile platforms (but shares some of their constraints). There is considerable interest in the user-base for a GCC port (starting with https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=96168) - and, of great kudos to the gfortran team, one of the main drivers is folks using Fortran. Fortunately, I was able to obtain access to one of the DTKs, courtesy of the OSS folks, and using that managed to draft an initial attempt at the port last year (however, nowhere near ready for presentation in GCC11). Nevertheless (as an aside) despite being a prototype, the port is in use with many via hombrew, macports or self-builds - which has shaken out some of the fixable bugs. The work done in the prototype identified three issues that could not be coded around without work on generic parts of the compiler. I am very happy to say that two of our colleagues, Andrew Burgess and Maxim Blinov (both from embecosm) have joined me in drafting a postable version of the port and we are seeking sponsorship to finish this in the GCC12 timeframe. Maxim has a lightning talk on the GNU tools track at LPC (right after the steering committee session) that will focus on the two generic issues that we’re tackling (1 and 2 below). Here is a short summary of the issues and proposed solutions (detailed discussion of any of the parts below would better be in new threads).

  • Apple Silicon / M1 Port Planned For GCC 12 - Phoronix

    Developers are hoping for next year's GCC 12 release they will have Apple AArch64 support on Darwin in place for being able to support Apple Silicon -- initially the M1 SoC -- on macOS with GCC. LLVM/Clang has long been supporting AArch64 on macOS given that Apple leverages LLVM/Clang as part of their official Xcode toolchain as the basis for their compiler across macOS to iOS and other products. While the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) supports AArch64 and macOS/Darwin, it hasn't supported the two of them together but there is a port in progress to change it.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.5 on CRAN: More Protect’ion

    Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN overnight. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. The Protect class now uses the default methods for copy and move constructors and assignment allowing for wide use of the class. The small NumVec class now uses it for its data member.

  • QML Modules in Qt 6.2

    With Qt 6.2 there is, for the first time, a comprehensive build system API that allows you to specify a QML module as a complete, encapsulated unit. This is a significant improvement, but as the concept of QML modules was rather under-developed in Qt 5, even seasoned QML developers might now ask "What exactly is a QML module". In our previous post we have scratched the surface by introducing the CMake API used to define them. We'll take a closer look in this post.

  • Santiago Zarate: So you want to recover and old git branch because it has been overwritten?
  • Start using YAML now | Opensource.com

    YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) is a human-readable data serialization language. Its syntax is simple and human-readable. It does not contain quotation marks, opening and closing tags, or braces. It does not contain anything which might make it harder for humans to parse nesting rules. You can scan your YAML document and immediately know what's going on. [...] At this point, you know enough YAML to get started. You can play around with the online YAML parser to test yourself. If you work with YAML daily, then this handy cheatsheet will be helpful.

  • 40 C programming examples

    C programming language is one of the popular programming languages for novice programmers. It is a structured programming language that was mainly developed for UNIX operating system. It supports different types of operating systems, and it is very easy to learn. 40 useful C programming examples have been shown in this tutorial for the users who want to learn C programming from the beginning.

Devices/Embedded: Asus Tinker Board 2 and More

  • Asus Tinker Board 2 single-board computer now available for $94 and up - Liliputing

    The Asus Tinker Board 2 is a Raspberry Pi-shaped single-board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor and featuring 2GB to 4GB of RAM. First announced almost a year ago, the Tinker Board 2 is finally available for $99 and up. Asus also offers a Tinker Board 2S model that’s pretty similar except that it has 16GB of eMMC storage. Prices for that model start at about $120.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #371 - Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940 – 2021

    This week ended with the incredibly sad news of the passing of Sir Clive Sinclair. He was one of the founding fathers of home computing and got many of us at Raspberry Pi hooked on programming as kids. Join us in sharing your Sinclair computing memories with us on Twitter and our blog, and we’ll see you next week.

  • cuplTag battery-powered NFC tag logs temperature and humidity (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Temperature and humidity sensors would normally connect to a gateway sending data to the cloud, the coin-cell battery-powered cuplTag NFC tag instead sends data to your smartphone after a tap. CulpTag is controlled by an MSP430 16-bit microcontroller from Texas Instruments which reads and stores sensor data regularly into an EEPROM, and the data can then be read over NFC with the tag returning an URL with the data from the sensor and battery, then display everything on the phone’s web browser (no app needed).

  • A first look at Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle RISC-V development board - CNX Software

    Formally launched on Crowd Supply a little over a year ago, Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle (codenamed MPFS-ICICLE-KIT-ES) was one of the first Linux & FreeBSD capable RISC-V development boards. The system is equipped with PolarFire SoC FPGA comprised a RISC-V CPU subsystem with four 64-bit RISC-V (RV64GC) application cores, one 64-bit RISC-V real-time core (RV64IMAC), as well as FPGA fabric. Backers of the board have been able to play with it for several months ago, but Microchip is now sending the board to more people for evaluation/review, and I got one of my own to experiment with. That’s good to have a higher-end development board instead of the usual hobbyist-grade board. Today, I’ll just have a look at the kit content and main components on the board before playing with Linux and FPGA development tools in an upcoming or two posts.

  • What is IoT device management?

    Smart devices are everywhere around us. We carry one in our pocket, watch movies on another while a third cooks us dinner. Every day there are thousands of new devices connecting to the Internet. Research shows that by 2025, more than 150,000 IoT devices will come online every minute. With such vast numbers it is impossible to keep everything in working order just on your own. This brings the need for IoT device management. But what is IoT device management? To answer this question we first need to understand what the Internet of Things (IoT) is.

  • Beelink U59 mini PC with Intel Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake coming soon - Liliputing

    Beelink says the system ships with Windows 10, but it should also supports Linux.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC to ship with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software

    Beelink U59 is an upcoming Jasper Lake mini PC based on the Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that will ship with up to 16GB RAM, and 512 GB M.2 SSD storage. The mini PC will also offer two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and support for 2.5-inch SATA drives up to 7mm thick.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa.  Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

  •     
  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support.  KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust.  Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering. Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly News, Juno Computers, Kali Linux 2021.3