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October 2020

Hangover Alpha 2 Lets Windows x86/x64 Programs Run On ARM64, POWER 64-bit

Filed under
Software

The Wine program for running Windows games/applications on Linux and other platforms can run on a number of different architectures, but Wine doesn't handle the emulation of running Windows x86/x64 binaries on other architectures like 64-bit ARM or PowerPC. But that's what the Wine-based Hangover is about with currently allowing those conventional Windows binaries to run on AArch64 (ARM64) and 64-bit POWER too.

Hangover started out with a focus on Windows x64 binaries on ARM64 in looking at the possible use-case of running Windows software on ARM mobile devices and more. This year with the help of Raptor Computing Systems there has been Hangover support added for IBM POWER 64-bit.

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Also: Come And Find Out About Her Story

Jonathan Dieter: Switching to OSTree

Filed under
Red Hat

Given our shift towards containers, the most obvious solution would have been to switch to Fedora CoreOS, but a number of our call servers have Sangoma telephony cards with kernel drivers that are, unfortunately, out-of-tree. While there are some elegant ways to load custom kernel modules into Fedora CoreOS, we needed a more stable kernel, due to the (lack of) speed in which these modules are updated to build with new kernels.

So we decided to go with a custom OSTree distribution (surprisingly named SpearlineOS), built using rpm-ostree and CentOS 8. SpearlineOS has two streams, staging and production. At the moment, we’re manually building each new release, pushing it to staging, running it through some smoke tests, and, then, finally, pushing it to production. We are in the process of setting up a full staging environment with automatic builds and automatic promotion to production once a build has been functioning correctly for set period of time. We’ve also setup greenboot in SpearlineOS so that our servers are able to fail back to an older release if the current one fails for any reason.

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Python Programming

Filed under
Development

KDE Bug-squashing

Filed under
KDE

  • This week in KDE: Continuous bug massacre

    This week the bug squashing continues at full speed! We’ve made short work of tons of bugs throughout our software stack, including the infamous login sound bug, some very important and longstanding issues with extended attributes, and a ton of quality-of-life improvements for the Plasma Wayland session.

    But we also managed to add a few nice new features that I think you’ll like.

  • KDE Saw A "Bug Massacre" This Week With Better NVIDIA Wayland Experience, Many Fixes

    The bug fixing in KDE land continues and ends the month with a "bug massacre", for how KDE developer Nate Graham describes it in his weekly recaps. 

    Graham also commented of this week's KDE efforts as "bug squashing continues at full speed!" Some of the work that got addressed this week for KDE includes: 

    - The KDE Plasma Wayland session no longer requires manually setting an environment variable to make NVIDIA GPUs with the proprietary driver properly function. This change is with KDE Plasma 5.20.2 for offering a better KDE Wayland out-of-the-box experience on NVIDIA's proprietary driver. This is addressed by automatically detecting the NVIDIA proprietary driver and EGLStreams rather than making the user set KWIN_DRM_USE_EGL_STREAMS. 

Chromium Browser Now Officially Available in Linux Mint and LMDE, Here’s How to Install It

Filed under
Linux

After making it hard for users to install the Chromium web browser on their distributions by deciding to drop support for Ubuntu’s Snap universal packages with the Linux Mint 20 release onwards, the Linux Mint developers are now packaging Chromium and distributing it trough the official repos.

Chromium is not only available in Linux Mint, but also in the Debian spin LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition). Users can now easily install the open-source web browser with a few mouse clicks. Depending on the edition you’re using (Cinnamon, MATE or Xfce), all you have to do is open the Software Manager and install Chromium.

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Kick Microsoft Windows 10 to the curb — switch to Ubuntu-based Linux Lite 5.2 today!

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Many technology pundits have been theorizing and discussing the possibility of Windows eventually becoming a Linux-based operating system. They cite the fact that Microsoft has become less dependent on Windows for revenue, making it silly to dedicate so many resources to it. Not to mention, Microsoft has certainly cozied up to both the Linux and open source communities nowadays.

Do I think Microsoft will make this move one day? Who knows. Years ago I'd say it was crazy, but in 2020, the company's flagship mobile device -- the Surface Duo -- runs the Linux-based Android. For now, Linux-based Windows remains pure conjecture. With that said, I think we can all agree on one thing -- Linux is the future of desktop computing, with Chrome OS leading the sea change.

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A Brief History of Ubuntu Touch

Filed under
Ubuntu

Sensing the tech trend, Ubuntu tried its hands on creating a Linux-based mobile operating system. The first announcement came a decade back and six years down the line, Ubuntu closed the curtains on the project.

What went wrong? How it started? Is Ubuntu Touch still alive? Let’s take a look at the history of Ubuntu Touch in chronological order.

The Ubuntu Touch project began with a blog post by Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth. The blog post, dated October 31, 2011, started with a bold prediction: “By 14.04 LTS Ubuntu will power tablets, phones, TVs and smart screens from the car to the office kitchen, and it will connect those devices cleanly and seamlessly to the desktop, the server and the cloud.”

Shuttleworth went on to explain that this move would be accomplished mainly through the use of the company’s new desktop environment, Unity. (Unity was introduced in Ubuntu 10.10.) “Unity, the desktop interface in today’s Ubuntu 11.10, was designed with this specific vision in mind.”

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Control Philips Hue Lights on Ubuntu with this GNOME Extension

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

In 2016 we wrote about a GTK app for managing Phillips Hue lights on the Linux desktop. Though very handy that tool hasn’t been updated for a while. But no worries: now there’s something better.

If you use Ubuntu (or any distro with GNOME Shell) and your Hue bulbs are connected to a Hue Bridge you can turn lights on or off, control their brightness, and even change their colour — directly from your desktop PC.

The brightly named “Hue Lights” GNOME Shell extension is able to discover Hue Bridges (or connect directly by IP). It lets you manage individual bulbs or groups of lights in “zones” (e.g., ‘bedroom lights’, ec).

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More in Tux Machines

pg_statement_rollback v1.3 released

pg_statement_rollback is a PostgreSQL extension to add server side transaction with rollback at statement level like in Oracle or DB2. Release v1.3 of pg_statement_rollback was released. This is a maintenance release to add support to PostgreSQL 14. See ChangeLog for a complete list of changes. Read more Also: PostgreSQL Weekly News - October 24, 2021

Review: Ubuntu 21.10

Ubuntu 21.10 (code name Impish Indri) and its many variant flavors were released on October 14. This release is a non-Long Term Support release, meaning it will be supported for nine months. Like all new releases of Ubuntu, Ubuntu 21.10 comes with numerous updates and enhancements. The most notable of these changes are the customized GNOME 40 desktop and Firefox being a Snap instead of a Deb package. Both of these changes are explored in depth in this review. Installing Ubuntu 21.10 I began by downloading the 2.9GB ISO and copying it to a flash drive. Booting the computer from the flash drive resulted in an extremely familiar experience. Unfortunately, the new installer currently being worked on did not make it into this release, so Ubuntu 21.10 still provides the same installation experience as all the recent releases of Ubuntu. Read more

Indie dev finds that Linux users generate more, better bug reports

An indie developer has found an interesting observation: Though only 5.8% of his game's buyers were playing on Linux, they generated over 38% of the bug reports. Not because the Linux platform was buggier, either. Only 3 of the roughly 400 bug reports submitted by Linux users were platform specific, that is, would only happen on Linux. The developer, posting as Koderski for developer Kodera Software on Reddit, makes indie game ΔV: Rings of Saturn—that's Delta V, or DV, for the non-rocket-science-literate. It's a hard science, physics-based space mining and piracy game that I quite like, personally, for its blend of playability that still honors the basics of spaceflight. If you quite like the space combat of, say, The Expanse, DV is a sim that might be for you. Koderski says he's sold a little over 12,000 copies of his game, and about 700 of those were bought by Linux players. "I got 1040 bug reports in total, out of which roughly 400 are made by Linux players," says Koderski's post. "That’s one report per 11.5 users on average, and one report per 1.75 Linux players. That’s right, an average Linux player will get you 650% more bug reports." Koderski's numbers are a limited sample size drawn from one person's experience, but tell a compelling story. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to use and install Stremio on Linux

    Stremio is a media center that allows users to watch movies, TV shows, and even YouTube videos instantaneously. It also supports DLNA and many other features. Here’s how to use Stremio on Linux.

  • Deploying containers with Consfigurator

    For some months now I’ve been working on some patches to Consfigurator to add support for Linux containers. My goal is to make Consfigurator capable of both performing the initial setup of a container and of entering the running container to apply configuration. For the case of unprivileged LXCs running as non-root, my work-in-progress branch can now do both of these things. As Consfigurator enters the container directly using system calls, it should be decently fast at configuring multiple containers on a host, and it will also be possible to have it do this in parallel. The initial setup for the container uses Consfigurator’s existing support for building root filesystems, and it should be easy to extend that to support arbitrary GNU/Linux distributions by teaching Consfigurator how to invoke bootstrapping tools other than debootstrap(8).

  • Vincent Bernat: FRnOG #34: how we deployed a datacenter in one click

    The presentation, in French, was recorded. I have added English subtitles.

  • How to install FileZilla on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install FileZilla on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Install Zoom Client on Fedora 35 - LinuxCapable

    Zoom is a communications technology platform that provides videotelephony and real-time online chat services through a cloud-based peer-to-peer software platform and is used for teleconferencing, telecommuting, distance education, and much more.

  • How to Install Sails.js Framework with Nginx on Rocky Linux 8 - LinuxCapable

    Sails.js is a Javascript framework that you can use to easily and quickly build customized enterprise-grade for Node.js. It resembles the MVC architecture from such frameworks as Ruby on Rails, but with improved support for the more data-oriented modern style of developing web applications and is compatible with other front-end including Angular, React, iOS, Android, Windows Phone, and much more. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Sails.js and access the web-based interface by installing and configuring an Nginx reverse proxy setup on Rocky Linux 8.

  • How to Zip and Unzip Files on Android (RAR, ZIP, 7Z) - Make Tech Easier

    If your job demands that you send many large files, or if you just want an easy way to send a large number of pictures to someone, zip files are a necessity – even on your phone! This article shows how to compress or decompress large files on your Android smartphone.

  • How to Install Python Pip / PIP3 on Debian 11 Bullseye - LinuxCapable

    PIP is the standard package manager for installing Python packages. With PIP, you can list, search and download to install packages from the Python Package Index (PyPI). PIP was first included with the Python installer since version 3.4 for Python 3 release and 2.7.9 for Python 2 and is well utilized with many Python projects. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install the PIP / PIP2 or PIP3 on Debian 11 Bullseye operating system.

  • How to Install Google Chrome on openSUSE Leap 15 - LinuxCapable

    ogle Chrome is the most used Internet Explorer software on the earth, with a recent update in 2021 that Chrome is currently the primary browser of more than 2.65 billion internet users. However, as you would know, after installing openSUSE, only Mozilla Firefox is packaged with the distribution but luckily, installing Google Chrome is a straightforward task. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Google Chrome in three various ways in stable, beta, or unstable versions on openSUSE Leap 15.

  • How to browse Reddit from the Linux desktop with Giara

    If you like Reddit but prefer to browse from an app, Giara may be for you. It is a Linux app that allows users to consume Reddit content from the desktop. In this guide, we’ll show you how to install it and use it on your system. Note: You must have a Reddit account to make use of the Giara application on Linux. To create a new Reddit account, head over to Reddit and click on the new “sign up” button.

  • How to Install Brave Browser on openSUSE Leap 15 - LinuxCapable

    Brave is a free and open-source web browser developed by Brave Software, Inc. based on the Chromium web browser. Brave is a privacy-focused Internet web browser, which distinguishes itself from other browsers by automatically blocking online advertisements and website trackers in its default settings. Brave has claimed its browser puts less strain on your computer’s performance than Google Chrome, regardless of how much you ask of it. Even with multiple tabs open at once, Brave uses less memory than Google Chrome-like, up to 66% less. In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install Brave on openSUSE Leap 15.

  • How to Install / Upgrade to Latest Nginx Mainline or Stable on openSUSE Leap 15 - LinuxCapable

    For those using openSUSE 15 Leap, you might have noticed that installing Nginx directly from its repository does not install the latest stable or mainline version. This is a common trend in most distributions that focus on the stability of packages and provide only urgent bug or security updates until the subsequent major distribution. For most, using the default Nginx that comes bundled with the repository will be preferred, but often many require and want the latest version of stable or mainline for updated features. The following tutorial will cover installing the last stable or mainline versions of Nginx on openSUSE 15 Leap.

  • How to Add a User to Sudoers on openSUSE - LinuxCapable

    When installing openSUSE, the user account that was created during the initial setup has sudo rights. However, there may be a need to add additional sudo users or make the default user have sudo rights. This is a straightforward process with a few commands. In the following tutorial, you will learn to add a user to the sudoers group on any openSUSE system.

  • How to easily download and install apps on Linux with AppImage Pool

    AppImagePool is an AppImageHub client for Linux. With it, users can easily browse and download AppImages from the AppImageHub store. Here’s how to get it working on your Linux system.