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February 2020

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MATE 1.24 Binaries Pushed

    I have just build the latest MATE 1.24 on top of latest Slackware-Current (per Feb 26 2020) and pushed the binaries into the usual repository provided by Darren Austin at slackware.uk. I took this chance to bump some libraries to the latest version available.

    As mentioned earlier, i can't provide mate-power-manager 1.24 since it requires new upower 0.99.x which uses a new API, so i will leave it as it is for now. Once new upower gets included, i will have to make some test first before pushing mate-power-manager 1.24 to public.

  • Lessons learned from Credit Karma GraphQL architecture

    Credit Karma and similar companies have transformed the personal finance market during the past two decades. Credit Karma has undergone multiple transformations since launching in 2007, culminating in reports this week from The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal that it will be acquired by Intuit in a deal valued at $7 billion. Credit Karma did not immediately respond to a request for confirmation of the acquisition.

    While multiple technologies have helped spur Credit Karma's growth, in recent years the company has increasingly embraced GraphQL architecture as a way to improve its services with faster response times for its 100 million members. According to the company, approximately 50% of Credit Karma's data traffic flows through GraphQL.

  • How to de-Google-ify your site to make it faster and visitor friendly

    Did you know that 94% of sites include at least one third-party resource while the median page requests content from 9 different domains? These third-party resources represent 35% of the total network activity and 7 of the 10 most used resources are owned by Google.

    Third-party resources slow down the web and are a concern for the privacy of people who visit these sites. Google themselves will point the finger at their analytics and ads when you use their speed tests. They provide guides on making third-party resources less slow too.

    Here’s how you can de-Google-ify your site, get fully independent and in control while having faster loading time, being more eco-friendly and more compliant with the privacy regulations such as GDPR and CCPA.

  • Open security group unveils common OpenDXL language

    Initially developed by McAfee, the OpenDXL messaging framework is already used by more than 4,000 suppliers and enterprises to develop and share integrations between various tools.

    Now, with the release of OpenDXL Ontology, OCA said it could offer a single, common language for notifications, information and actions across security products, providing users with a set of tooling that can be applied once and automatically reused everywhere, while eliminating the need to update integrations for new product versions and functionalities.

  • Open Cybersecurity Alliance announces new language for connecting cybersecurity tools

    OpenDXL Ontology is based on the Open Data Exchange Layer (OpenDXL), an open messaging framework to develop and share integrations with other tools. With the release of the language, the alliance can provide a single, common solution for notifications, information, actions and communicating with other tools. In addition, it provides companies with a set of tooling that can be applied once and automatically reused everywhere across all product categories, while also eliminating the need to update integrations as product versions and functionalities change

  • Open Cybersecurity Alliance Unveils First Open Source Language

    The newly formed Open Cybersecurity Alliance connects the fragmented cyber-security landscape with common, open source code and practices that allow companies to “integrate once, reuse everywhere.” Governed under the auspices of OASIS, the OCA now includes more than 25 member organizations and has brought two major intero-perability projects into the open-source realm, with OpenDXL Ontology (contributed by McAfee) and STIX Shifter (contributed by IBM Security) now available for cross-industry collaboration and development on GitHub.

    In addition to the availability of OpenDXL Ontology, the OCA is also announcing the formation of its Technical Steering Committee, including leaders from AT&T, IBM Security, McAfee, Packet Clearinghouse, and Tripwire, who will drive the technical direction and development of the organization.

  • Test and Code: 102: Cosmic Python, TDD, testing and external dependencies - Harry Percival

    Harry Percival has completed his second book, "Architecture Patterns with Python".
    So of course we talk about the book, also known as "Cosmic Python".
    We also discuss lots of testing topics, especially related to larger systems and systems involving third party interfaces and APIs.

  • IRC is Not Dead | Self-Hosted 13

    Self-Hosted IRC solutions are better than ever. Alan Pope joins us to make a case for the classic way to communicate online and tells us about a modern client for the web, mobile, and desktop you run on your server.

    Plus, follow up on the new Self-Hosted wiki, and more.

  • BSD Fundraising | BSD Now 339

    Meet FuryBSD, NetBSD 9.0 has been released, OpenBSD Foundation 2019 campaign wrapup, a retrospective on OmniOS ZFS-based NFS fileservers, NetBSD Fundraising 2020 goal, OpenSSH 8.2 released, and more.## Headlines

  • UbuntuBuzz.com is Now HTTPS and Got New Design!

    Dear readers! We have two good news for you. Starting from Tuesday, 25 February 2020, UbuntuBuzz.com website is now more secure with HTTPS and more fresh with new design. Firstly, by HTTPS you would notice a green padlock on your browser address bar. That's the security sign meaning connection between you and this site is now encrypted. By encrypted means you are safe from tampering in the middle of connection which usually done by crackers or bad internet services. Secondly, after a period of broken design (caused by TinyPic.com shutdown as our image assets were hosted there) whole website is now kindly redesigned by the owner of this website, Mr. Mahmudin Ashar. However, there are still undergoing changes being made so you will see more stuffs coming. Personally, as an author here I really feel grateful to him and I love these changes! I hope these changes make you feel more comfortable visiting us. Do you love these new changes? Please give us feedbacks on comment section. We thank you all dear readers for your support!

The Apache Software Foundation Announces 20th Anniversary of Apache® Subversion®

Filed under
Development

The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today the 20th Anniversary of Apache® Subversion®, the popular centralized software version control system.

Apache Subversion ("SVN") allows users to commit code, manage changes, and recover previous versions of all sorts of data across files and directories. Subversion is ideal for distributed teams who need to easily audit and act on modification logs and versioning history across projects. Subversion originated at CollabNet in 2000 as an effort to create an Open Source version-control system similar to the then-standard CVS (Concurrent Versions System) but with additional features and functionality. Subversion was submitted to the Apache Incubator In November 2009, and became an Apache Top-Level Project in February 2010.

"We are very proud of Subversion's long history, and remain committed to our mission statement," said Stefan Sperling, Vice President of Apache Subversion. "Subversion has moved well beyond its initial goal of creating a compelling replacement for CVS. In 2010 our mission statement was updated to ‘Enterprise-class centralized version control for the masses’.”

Read more

Also: Apache Celebrates Subversion's 20th Anniversary

Software: HPLIP, MuseScore, TeamViewer

Filed under
Software
  • HPLIP 3.20.2 Released with Linux Mint 19.3 Support

    HPLIP 3.20.2, HP developed open source Linux driver for HP printers and scanners, was released today with many new devices and Linux Mint 19.3 support.

  • MuseScore – Create, play, and print beautiful sheet music

    Do you need a top-notch musical notation editor for your Linux PC? MuseScore should be the software of your choice. A good music notation app requires to provide the user with features like quick corrections, fast editing, reliable sharing, and provision of a uniform layout of sheet music. It should make the whole process of creating, editing, and printing music a lot easier and fast.

    MuseScore is one of the powerful and versatile open-source music score editors in the market. It might not offer all the editing features provided by high-end paid software, but it provides users with the core functionality needed.

  • Best 14 teamviewer alternatives for Linux/Ubuntu

    One of the most popular software enabling computers to be controlled remotely is TeamViewer, but there are many other options that are available as well, which have just as many features (desktop sharing, online conferences, and data transfers). Since TeamViewer dominates the major online users, it has long ranked number one by many users.
    However, for many, TeamViewer isn’t their number one choice and so in the true spirit of ope n source, let’s talk about thousands of similar software. Since I can’t discuss it all, let’s talk about the top 14 alternatives of TeamViewer for Linux in 2020.

Security: Patches, Whonix, IPFire and More

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel, ksh, python-pillow, and thunderbird), Debian (opensmtpd, proftpd-dfsg, and rake), Fedora (NetworkManager-ssh), openSUSE (chromium), and SUSE (libexif, mariadb, ovmf, python3, and squid). 

  • Whonix VirtualBox 15.0.0.8.9 - Point Release! - vanguards; TCP ISN Leak Protection; Extensive Hardening!

    This is a point release.

    Download Whonix for VirtualBox:

  • Build your career in Computer Forensics: List of Digital Forensic Tools - Part I

    Digital devices are present everywhere and considered to be the primary source of evidence in the case of cybercrime. Out of all the devices, phones and laptops are the top weapons used in cybercrimes. Regardless of who the device belonged to, either the victim or suspect, it offers an abundance of data to investigate the crime. But retrieving evidence from these devices in a secure environment can be very challenging. To overcome the time constraint and other complications, cyber forensic professionals use digital forensic tools.  

  • What are Open Source Security Approaches? With Examples

    Open source security approaches enable organizations to secure their applications and networks while avoiding expensive proprietary security offerings. 

    An open source approach allows organizations to secure their applications across cloud providers and other platforms using platform-agnostic APIs. These APIs are written by contributors to the open source software code while cloud providers may use open source code that allows the open APIs to connect to the cloud.

    Open source approaches, for security or not, also bring in collaboration across an industry. It isn’t just one organization that benefits from a program or technology, but everyone who contributes to and uses it.

    The open source projects and programs used as examples in this article come from two major open source entities: The Linux Foundation and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The two also work closely together to further the projects under their purview.

  • Cloud Snooper: Hackers Using Linux Kernel Driver To Attack Cloud Server [Ed: So, if you install malicious software in Linux, due to recklessness or sabotage, it'll do malicious things. How is that a Linux weakness?]

    Whether you’re a Linux user or not, you must have heard the buzzword about the Linux — “Best OS for security.” Well, it is true, but being a computer program, Linux also has some downside that challenges its security.

    Talking about the security risks, recently, SophosLab published a report about a new malware dubbed Cloud Snooper, that can compromise the security of any Linux or other OS based servers by deploying a kernel driver.

  • IPFire on AWS: Update to IPFire 2.25 - Core Update 141

    Today, we have updated IPFire on AWS to IPFire 2.25 - Core Update 141 - the latest official release of IPFire.

    Since IPFire is available on AWS, we are gaining more and more users who are securing their cloud infrastructure behind an easy to configure, yet fast and secure firewall.

    This update adds the rewritten DNS stack and brings many bug fixes to the cloud.

Huawei’s plan to escape Google could fix Android for everyone

Filed under
OS
Android

Huawei has stopped sidestepping the unavoidable question – no Google, what next? After suggesting it could (eventually) make its own smartphone operating system, built on Harmony OS in 2019, Huawei is now unequivocal – for the foreseeable future, it’s all in with its Google Mobile Services (GMS) free version of Android.

The long term partnership with Google saw Huawei launch the jewel in its crown, the P30 Pro, which, a year on, is still an easy phone to recommend. But, there’s a big question mark over its more recent, arguably better-specced devices like the Mate 30 Pro and upcoming Huawei Mate Xs, given the fact they don’t support essential features like access to the Google Play Store.

Rather than serve as an indictment on Huawei’s inability to step up and deliver an alternative within months, however, this is part of a much bigger question. Is Android really open source, or have developers, manufacturers and, ultimately, all of us as Android users been sleepwalking into a state of total dependence upon Google?

It’s important to note that if Google had its way, we could say with some assurance, it would keep working with Huawei. After all, this political fallout highlights just how hoodwinked the world is into thinking the Android we’ve been using is an open-source alternative to iOS.

Read more

GNU/Linux on Devices

  • VOIXATCH Smartwatch Comes with a Detachable Bluetooth Headset (Crowdfunding)

    VOIXATCH runs an Android-based OS, and an accompanying app is also provided.

  • AI comes to the Edge with SolidRun and Gyrfalcon's AI inference server

    What's an AI inference server you ask? Once you've trained a neural network with machine learning to recognize, say, cars and spaces, it's learned lessons can be built into an application. That program can then infer things about new data based on its training. So, for example, an AI-empowered traffic cop might infer when someone's speeding or has run a red light.

    Of course, if you're going to do anything about this in real-time, you need a computer on the edge rather than a second or two of latency away in a cloud datacenter. That's where the Janux GS31 comes in.

    The Janux GS31 comes as a rackmount 1U server. At its heart, it uses a CEx7 LX2160A 16-core Arm Cortex A72 CPU. For its real processing power, it can use up to 128 Gyrfalcon Lightspeeur SPR2803 AI acceleration chips and 32 i.MX8M System on Chips (SoC)s. For fast memory, it uses up to 64GB dual-channel SO-DIMM DDR4 RAM.

    This supports all major neural network frameworks. Specifically, it supports the open-source TensorFlow, Caffe, and PyTorch frameworks.

  • Arm, Aeler Select IoT Linux Platform FoundriesFactory

    FoundriesFactory is a secure, customizable embedded Linux platform that enables customers, regardless of size, to develop, deploy and maintain secure Internet of Things and Edge devices for life. It offers support for a range of SoCs, SoMs and single board computers as the starting point for customers to deliver, deploy and maintain software on their own hardware.

  • Play Pong with ultrasonic sensors and a Raspberry Pi | HackSpace magazine

    Day three of our Pong celebration leads us here, to HackSpace magazine’s ultrasonic hack of Eben’s Code the Classics Pong tribute, Boing!

  • OnLogic AMD Ryzen Embedded Mini PCs Launched for $565 and Up
  • Adafruit Industries Joins Zephyr Project

    The Zephyr Project, an open source project at the Linux Foundation, has added Adafruit Industries to its growing ecosystem.

    Adafruit makes open source hardware, tutorials and code for makers to create DIY electronic products. With this development, Adafruit now joins member companies including Antmicro, Eclipse Foundation, Foundries.io, Intel, Linaro, Nordic Semiconductor, NXP, Oticon, SiFive, Synopsys, Texas Instruments and more to create an open hardware and software ecosystem using the Zephyr OS.

Linux-driven net appliance has six GbE and a pair of 10GbE ports

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

The new Puzzle-IN003B offers standard SKUs that run Ubuntu 18.04 on the quad-core Atom C3358 and the similarly 2.2GHz, octa-core C3758. However, models up to the 16-core C3958 are also supported. IEI touts Denverton’s Intel QuickAssist technology for “providing up to 20 Gbps of crypto performance, ensuring secure data transfer while reserving valuable processor cycles for other tasks.”

Read more

Panfrost Open-Source Driver Gets Initial OpenGL ES 3.0 Support

Filed under
OSS

This comes as great news for Linux users, especially gamers. While many 3D apps and games have basic OpenGL ES 2.0 support, for advanced rendering tasks the newer OpenGL ES 3.0 is required, and Panfrost now supports it.

As expected, OpenGL ES 3.0 is by far more powerful than its predecessor, adding new features like to 3D textures, instanced rendering, multiple render targets on Mali T760 GPUs and higher, primitive restart, as well as uniform buffer objects.

Read more

Also: Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Adds Experimental OpenGL ES 3.0 For Open-Source Arm Mali

More in Tux Machines

FSF Chasing Members and GNU Project Has a Dozen New Releases This Month

  • Don’t miss your chance to win fabulous prizes: Get your friends to join the FSF!

    As you may already know, every associate member is incredibly valuable to the Free Software Foundation (FSF). Since most of our funding comes from individual donations and memberships, associate members aren’t just a number. Each new membership magnifies our reach and our ability to effect social change, by demonstrating your commitment to the crucial cause of software freedom. Right now, FSF associate members have the opportunity to reap some fantastic rewards by participating in our virtual LibrePlanet membership drive. We still have the raffle prizes generously donated by Technoethical, Vikings, JMP.chat, and ThinkPenguin for this year’s LibrePlanet conference, which we held entirely online this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, we’re giving them away to those who go the extra mile to help us grow by referring new annual associate members to sign up!

  • May GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 12 new releases!

    bison-3.6.2 denemo-2.4.0 emms-5.4 freeipmi-1.6.5 gcc-10.1.0 gdb-9.2 gnuastro-0.12 gnuhealth-3.6.4 mediagoblin-0.10.0 nano-4.9.3 nettle-3.6 parallel-20200522

Programming: SDL, QML, Python, Awk/Bash and More

  • Photoframe Hack

    Sometimes you just want to get something done. Something for yourself. You do not intend it to be reused, or even pretty. You build a tool. My tool was a photoframe with some basic overlays. I wanted the family calendar, some weather information (current temperature + forecast), time, and the next bus heading for the train station. [...] I also have a bunch of REST calls to my local home assistant server. Most of these reside in the HassButton class, but I also get the current temperature from there. These are hardcoded for my local network, so needs refactoring to be used outside of my LAN. All of these interfaces require API keys of one kind or another – be it a proper key, or a secret URL. These are pulled from environment variables in main.cpp and then exposed to QML. That way, you can reuse the components without having to share your secrets.

  • Writing the Ultimate Locking Check

    In theory a clever programmer could discover all the bugs in a piece of software just by examining it carefully, but in reality humans can't keep track of everything and they get distracted easily. A computer could use the same logic and find the bugs through static analysis. There are two main limitations for static analysis. The first is that it is hard to know the difference between a bug and feature. Here we're going to specify that holding a lock for certain returns is a bug. This rule is generally is true but occasionally the kernel programmers hold a lock deliberately. The second limitation is that to understand the code, sometimes you need to understand how the variables are related to each other. It's difficult to know in advance which variables are related and it's impossible to track all the relationships without running out of memory. This will become more clear later. Nevertheless, static analysis can find many bugs so it is a useful tool. Many static analysis tools have a check for locking bugs. Smatch has had one since 2002 but it wasn't exceptional. My first ten patches in the Linux kernel git history fixed locking bugs and I have written hundreds of these fixes in the years since. When Smatch gained the ability to do cross function analysis in 2010, I knew that I had to re-write the locking check to take advantage of the new cross function analysis feature. When you combine cross function analysis with top of the line flow analysis available and in depth knowledge of kernel locks then the result is the Ultimate Locking Check! Unfortunately, I have a tendency towards procrastination and it took me a decade to get around to it, but it is done now. This blog will step through how the locking analysis works.

  • Raising the ground

    To read this blog I recommend you to be familiar with C programming language and (not mandatory) basics about SDL2. The main goal of this blog is not to give you a copy and paste code, instead it will guide you along the way until you get results by your own merit, also if you find any issues/mistakes/room for improvement please leave a response, thanks for reading.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #422 (May 26, 2020)
  • Real Python: A Beginner's Guide to Pip

    What is pip? pip is the standard package manager for Python. It allows you to install and manage additional packages that are not part of the Python standard library. This course is an introduction to pip for new Pythonistas.

  • Awk Cheatsheet And Examples

    Awk is a great utility for text parsing and maniupulation. All unix operating systems have Awk installed by default. If you are on Windows. Please check out at the bottom of this tutorial on how to install and enable awk on Windows.

  • Printing repeats within repeats, and splitting a list into columns

    Repeats within repeats. BASH printf is a complex piece of machinery. The man page says a printf command should look like printf FORMAT [ARGUMENT]..., which makes it seem the "argument" is the thing to be printed and the "format" describes how.

Devices/Embedded With Linux

  • Gemini Lake industrial mini-PCs are loaded with USB and COM ports

    GigaIPC latest QBiX Series industrial mini-PCs run Linux or Windows on Intel Gemini Lake and offer up to 8x USB and 5x COM ports plus dual displays, GbE, SATA III, M.2, and ruggedization features. Taiwanese computer vendor Gigabyte primarily produces consumer and enterprise desktop PC and server equipment, so we were surprised in 2017 when it launched an embedded 3.5-inch, Intel Apollo Lake GA-SBCAP3350 SBC. The following year in 2018, Gigabyte spun off GigaIPC as an embedded unit, and it has already generated a large catalog of Intel-based products including Micro-ATX, Mini-ITX, thin Mini-ITX, and 110 x 105mm “10×10” boards. There are 15 different 3.5-inch “QBi Pro” boards much like the GA-SBCAP3350, but also available with Whiskey Lake and Kaby Lake-U processors.

  • 19″ Rackmounts Support up to 12 Raspberry Pi SBCs

    Last time, we wrote about myelectronics.nl we covered their Tesla Cybertruck Case for Intel NUCs which housed the mini PC into a mini CyberTruck looking enclosure. The company has now come up with new housing solutions specifically designed for Raspberry Pi 1/2/3/4 Model B/B+ boards.

  • PoE-ready Ryzen V1000 SBC is all about camera control

    Axiomtek’s “MIRU130” SBC targets embedded vision applications with a Ryzen V1000 SoC, 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, HDMI and DP ports, cam triggers and lighting controls, 2x M.2, PCIe x16, and 4x GbE ports, 2x of which offer PoE. Axiomtek recently launched a CAPA13R, joineing Seco’s similarly 3.5-inch SBC-C90 as the only SBCs we have seen based on AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V100. Now Axiomtek has returned with a larger, V1000-based MIRU130 motherboard with a 244 x 170mm form factor that falls in between Mini-ITX and Micro-ATX.

  • IAR Systems Delivers Efficient Embedded Software Building on Linux

    Through the C/C++ compiler and debugger toolchain IAR Embedded Workbench®, IAR Systems provides its customers with the market's most diverse microcontroller support as well as adapted licensing options to fit different organizations' needs. This flexibility is now extended to the build environment as the well-known build tools in IAR Embedded Workbench now support Linux. The tools offer leading code quality, outstanding optimizations for size and speed, and fast build times. Supporting implementation in Linux-based frameworks for automated application build and test processes, the tools enable large-scale deployments of critical software building and testing and is suitable for installations ranging from a few licenses on a small build server, to massive installations with several hundreds of parallel builds active at the same time.

  • Librem 5 April 2020 Software Development Update

    This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for April 2020 (weeks 14-18). Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summaries is so you can have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth. So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab.)

Games: Burning Knight, Elder Scrolls, Cities: Skylines and PyGame

  • Burning Knight is a roguelike where you rob a dungeon, coming soon

    At least the setting is honest, you're totally robbing the dungeons in Burning Knight and then attempting to flee. Burning Knight is an action-packed procedurally generated roguelike, with fast-paced action and plenty of exploration across various floors in the Burning Knight's castle that you're stealing goods from. It can turn into a bullet-hell in some rooms, there's hundreds of items to find and they can be combined to "build your very own game-breaking combos" and it does sound awesome. The developer, Rexcellent Games, just announced on Twitter yesterday that it's now actually complete. They're waiting on Valve's approval, and it looks like it will hopefully release next month. SteamDB captured the date changing to June 5 but that might be a temporary date.

  • Stadia gets Elder Scrolls Online on June 16, 1440p in web and more

    A few bits of Stadia news for you as Google have announced the next set of additions coming to their game streaming service. For players who were a bit let down by resolution options, there's some good news. As some players already saw across the last few weeks and today being made properly official, 1440p is now an option when playing Stadia in a web browser.

  • Humble Cities: Skylines Bundle is up for some easy city building

    Cities: Skylines, one of the finest city builders ever is now available in a big Humble Bundle for you to grab the base game and lots of extra content. This is honestly a ridiculously good deal and probably the cheapest Cities: Skylines has ever been. For £1 you can get Cities: Skylines and the Deep Focus Radio DLC. Even if you only go for that, there's a lot to enjoy without any expansions.

  • Python Qt5 - PyQt5 and PyGame compatibility with source code.

    This tutorial tries to solve from the objectives related to solving and stabilizing compatibility errors between PyQt4 and PyQt5 and creating a common interface between PyQt5 and PyGame. There is always the same problem in programming when the developer for some reason has to change classes, methods and functions and reusing the old code is no longer valid. In this case, common or other errors occur, which leads to a waste of time.