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December 2019

The End of Tux Machines' Strongest Year

Filed under
Site News

Tux Machines 2020

TODAY is the last day of the last month of this year if not decade. We're pleased to close this year with record traffic levels. In 2019 we increased our coverage of programming-centric matters, especially when the underlying frameworks/languages were Free/libre software.

Earlier this year we also celebrated our 15th anniversary. There are three of us working behind the scenes to make the site up to date and keep it up (online). We're all passionate users of GNU/Linux who want to spread the word and encourage more people to use the platform.

In 2019 not only did we see record traffic levels; we also saw an unprecedented level of success for GNU/Linux in the adoption sense. Rianne is responsible for "Android leftovers" and remember that each Android device has Linux (or "Tux") in it. Google explored alternatives, but we haven't heard of these for months. It's nowadays very difficult to run a company or start a company without Linux -- no matter if in the server or device space. Let's hope Tux Machines will be around -- and online -- for many years to come. Happy new year.

Security: Updates, Samsung, Wyze, Slackware

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (debian-lan-config, freeimage, imagemagick, libxml2, mediawiki, openssl1.0, php5, and tomcat8).

  • What is Samsung Secure Wi-Fi?

    Samsung Galaxy and Note smartphones come with a pre-installed app called Samsung Secure Wi-Fi. The app can’t be uninstalled from the app manager on the device. Scroll to the bottom of the article for uninstallation instructions.

    Samsung is thin on the details and doesn’t say much about what the service does. Every time you connect to a Wi-Fi network it sends you the following promotional push-notification.

  • Wyze Data Leak Exposes Personal Information of Nearly 2.5 Million Customers

    We talk often at IoT Tech Trends about the potential of important personal information being vulnerable because of smart home Internet of Things devices. Many times, it seems the device manufacturers aren’t very upfront about the lack of security and data breaches.

    But Wyze is different. Regrettably, the company suffered a data leak that exposed the personal information of 2.4 million customers. However, they are owning up to it and taking quick action to mend the situation. It does nothing to change the leak, but it is a refreshing change.

  • New handbrake and mkvtoolnix packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current

    I was a couple of releases behind on the Handbrake video transcoding software. I am always a bit hesitant with upgrading Handbrake. It has a history of being hard to compile on the stable Slackware releases.

    Most notably it is the GTK+3 based GUI for which our Slackware libraries are often too old. And indeed, with the latest 1.3.0 release I found that this would not compile on Slackware 14.2 despite the hack I already used for the previous package (1.2..2) which I created earlier in 2019. It took me a day to come up with a second patch that allows Handbrake 1.3.0 to compile against our gtk+3 3.18.9 while in fact the program’s GUI component wants gtk+3 3.20.0 or higher.
    So, Slackware 14.2 users – please tell me if you find that some functionality of the GUI is not working… it should all work properly but you never know.
    In addition, I had to add a patch to make the new dav1d AV1 decoder compile on Slackware 14.2 but luckily I could just re-implement what I had already done for VLC.

Designing an Icon for Your App

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
GNOME

You’ve designed your app’s interface, and found the perfect name for it. But of course a great app also needs a great icon before you can release it to the world.

After the name, the app icon is the most important part of an app’s brand. The icon can help explain at a glance what the app does, and serves as an entry point to the rest of the experience. A high quality icon can make people want to use an app more, because it’s a stand-in for the quality of the entire app.

Think of the app icon like an album cover for your app. Yes, technically the music is the same even if you have a terrible cover, but a great cover can capture the spirit of the album and elevate the quality of the thing as a whole.

Read more

Also: Fwupd 1.3.6 Firmware Updater Released With Initial Windows Support

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Python Timer Functions: Three Ways to Monitor Your Code

    While many developers recognize Python as an effective programming language, pure Python programs may run slower than their counterparts in compiled languages like C, Rust, and Java. Throughout this tutorial, you’ll see how to use a Python timer to monitor how fast your programs are running.

  • 2019 qutebrowser crowdfunding - reminder

    Just like in the 2017/2018 crowdfundings, it'll be possible to get t-shirts and stickers again. I'll also add some new swag to the mix Smile

    [...]

    Somewhen after 2020 comes around the corner (and probably after my birthday on the 2nd) I'm going to adjust the perks accordingly.

  • Training on batch: how do you split the data?

    With increasing volumes of the data, a common approach to train machine-learning models is to apply the so-called training on batch. This approach involves splitting a dataset into a series of smaller data chunks that are handed to the model one at a time.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Saul Pwanson

    This week we welcome Saul Pwanson (@saulfp) as our PyDev of the Week! Saul is the creator of VisiData, an interactive multitool for tabular data. If you’d like to see what Saul has been up to, then you should check out his website or his Github profile. You can also support Saul’s open source endeavors on Patreon. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Saul better!

    Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

    I grew up in Chicagoland in the 80s, was on BBSes in the early 90s, and IRC in college and thereafter. I’ve been once to the Recurse Center in New York, twice to Holland, and six times to Bruno’s in Gerlach, NV. I like crossword puzzles, board games, and point-and-click adventures. One day I’d like to finish my “board simulation” of the awe-inspiring mechanics inside mitochondria.

    Why did you start using Python

    It was for a job at a startup back in 2004. It’s really great as a scripting language, and the standard library makes most common things easy by itself, with the rest of the ecosystem providing not just one but usually about 4 different ways of doing any task, often including one that works really well. I tip my hat to all the unsung deve

  • Minimizing context switching between shell and Python

RockPro64 Review

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

Since there are so many options available for Operating System images the RockPro64 is a great board. The benchmarks show it has quite the processor to run applications without breaking the bank. It currently sells for around $60 depending on the options. For gamers this is a nice board if you use Recalbox.

Read more

Jussi Pakkanen: How about not stabbing ourselves in the leg with a rusty fork?

Filed under
Development
OSS

Corporations are funny things. Many things no reasonable person would do on their own are done every day in thousands of business conglomerates around the world. With pride even. Let us consider as an arbitrary example a corporation where every day is started by employees stabbing themselves in the leg with a rusty fork. This is (I hope) not actually done for real, but there could be a company out there where this is the daily routine.

If you think that such a thing could possibly never happen, congratulations on having never worked in a big corporation. Stick with that if you can!

When faced with this kind of pointless and harmful routine, one might suggest not doing it any more or replacing it with some other, more useful procedure. This does not succeed, of course, but that is not the point. The reasons you get back are the interesting thing, because they will tell you what kind of manager and coworkers you are dealing with. Here are some possible options, can you think of more?

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ExTiX Deepin 20.1 live based on Deepin 15.11 (latest) with Skype, Spotify, Refracta Snapshot and kernel 5.5.0-rc3 :: Build 191230

Filed under
GNU
Linux

1.You can run ExTiX from RAM. Use boot alternative 3 (load to RAM) or Advanced. A wonderful way to run Linux if you have enough RAM. Everything will be super fast. When ExTiX has booted up you can remove the DVD or USB stick.
2. You will have the opportunity to choose language before you enter the Deepin 15.11 Desktop. All main languages are supported.
3. I have replaced Deepin Installer with the Reborn version of Deepin Installer. Works better in every way.
4. I have replaced kernel 5.3.0-rc6-exton with kernel 5.5.0-rc3-exton.
5. Spotify and Skype are pre-installed.
6. You can watch Netflix while running Firefox.
7. You can install ExTiX Deepin also in VirtualBox/VMware using Deepin Installer. (In previous versions you had to “chroot” into the install partition and install Grub).
8. While installing ExTiX Deepin to a USB stick using Rufus 3.8 you can create a persistent

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Notepad++ Alternatives For Linux

Filed under
Software

This article aims to introduce you to some of the most popular Notepad++ alternatives for Linux including the installation, basic features and functions.

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More in Tux Machines

Ferdi: A Free & Open-Source Alternative to Franz & Rambox

A single application to help you manage multiple services comes in handy when you do not want to do everything on your browser. While technically, you can, it may not be the most organized way of doing things. Hence, options like Rambox and Franz are pretty popular cross-platform solutions to sign in to several services and access all of them at a glance. Even though they both are available for Linux (and we’ve covered them separately), they offer limited features for free. In contrast, Ferdi is a fork of Franz offering many premium functionalities for free while aiming to provide a better experience. Read more

How to Install Python 3.10 in Ubuntu and Other Related Linux

Planning to get the Python 3.10 installed for your work? Here's how to install Python 3.10 in Ubuntu and related distributions. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Newest Linux Optimizations Can Achieve 10M IOPS Per-Core With IO_uring - Phoronix

    Just one week ago Linux block subsystem maintainer Jens Axboe was optimizing the kernel to get 8 million IOPS on a single CPU core. He progressed the week hitting around ~8.9M IOPS per-core and began to think he was hitting the hardware limits and running out of possible optimizations. However, this week he is kicking things off by managing to hit 10 million IOPS!

  • Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Quick overview #Shorts - Invidious

    A Quick overview of Ubuntu Kylin 21.10.

  • Reset Password On Any Linux Distro (No Root Needed) - Invidious

    Losing your access to your user account on Linux can be really frustrating but luckily resetting that lost password is actually incredibly easy but the process slightly changes depending on the bootloader you're using at least for the easy approach

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 706

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 706 for the week of October 17 – 23, 2021.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.43 Thank You

    Oleksandr Kyriukhin has released the 2021.10 version of the Rakudo Compiler, which includes all of the work of the new MoarVM dispatch mechanism. This is the culmination of more than 1.5 year work by many people, but mostly by Jonathan Worthington. A historic step forward that lays the groundwork on more efficient executing of Raku programs, and actually delivers on a number of improvements.

  • Team Profile by KDE's Cornelius Schumacher

    What makes a great team? One important factor is that you have a balanced set of skills and personalities in the team. A team which only consists of leaders won't get much work done. A team which only consists of workers will not work into the right direction. So how can you identify the right balance and combination of people? One answer is the Team Member Profile Test. It's a set of questions which team members answer. They are evaluated to give a result indicating which type of team member the person is and where it lies in the spectrum of possible types.

  • Some users on Reddit report that Windows 11 loses Internet connectivity when trying to connect to NordVPN.
  • Pat Gelsinger's Open-Source Bias, Intel's Pledge To Openness [Ed: Intel is openwashing again, but leaks from Intel show that Intel is a foe, not a a friend. It's also rather ironic that Intel puts an "open" letter in a proprietary site of Microsoft, which is viciously attacking Free software. Intel is a Microsoft booster.]

    Ahead of Intel's inaugural Intel Innovation event taking place virtually later this week, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger published an open letter to an open ecosystem. In this open ecosystem letter, Gelsinger talks up opennness and choice, adding, "This is why I fundamentally believe in an open source bias, which powers the software-defined infrastructure that transformed the modern data center and ushered in the data-centric era."

Raspberry Pi and Arduino Leftovers

  • Fast Indoor Robot Watches Ceiling Lights, Instead of the Road

    To pull this off, [Andy] uses a camera with a fisheye lens aimed up towards the ceiling, and the video is processed on a Raspberry Pi 3.

  • Tackle The Monkey: Raspberry Pi Gets Round Screen | Hackaday

    You could argue that the project to add a round screen to a Raspberry Pi from [YamS1] isn’t strictly necessary. After all, you could use a square display with a mask around it, giving up some screen real estate for aesthetics. However, you’d still have a square shape around the screen and there’s something eye-catching about a small round screen for a watch, an indicator, or — as in this project — a talking head. The inspiration for the project was a quote from a Google quote about teaching a monkey to recite Shakespeare. A 3D printed monkey with a video head would be hard to do well with a rectangular screen, you have to admit. Possible with a little artistry, we are sure, but the round head effect is hard to beat. Honestly, it looks more like an ape to us, but we aren’t primate experts and we think most people would get the idea.

  • Move! makes burning calories a bit more fun | Arduino Blog

    Gamifying exercise allows people to become more motivated and participate more often in physical activities while also being distracted by doing something fun at the same time. This inspired a team of students from the Handong Global University in Pohang, South Korea to come up with a system, dubbed “Move!,” that uses a microcontroller to detect various gestures and perform certain actions in mobile games accordingly. They started by collecting many different gesture samples from a Nano 33 BLE Sense, which is worn by a person on their wrist. This data was then used to train a TensorFlow Lite model that classifies the gesture and sends it via Bluetooth to the host phone running the app. Currently, the team’s mobile app contains three games that a player can choose from.