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June 2019

4MLinux 30.0 BETA released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux 30.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages.

Road map:
June 2019 -> BETA
September 2019 -> STABLE
December 2019 -> OLD STABLE
March 2020 -> EOL

Read more

4 Best Adobe Illustrator Alternatives for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Adobe Illustrator is considered to be the best when it comes to illustration and design on Windows and Mac, but the app isn’t available on Linux. So, if you’ve recently switched to an open source, Linux operating system, you’ll need to find a suitable alternative to use. Here are the best Adobe Illustrator alternatives for Linux.

Read more

GNUnet 0.11.5 released

Filed under
GNU

We are pleased to announce the release of GNUnet 0.11.5.

This is a bugfix release for 0.11.4, mostly fixing a few minor bugs and improving performance, in particular for identity management with a large number of egos. In the wake of this release, we also launched the REST API documentation. In terms of usability, users should be aware that there are still a large number of known open issues in particular with respect to ease of use, but also some critical privacy issues especially for mobile users. Also, the nascent network is tiny (about 200 peers) and thus unlikely to provide good anonymity or extensive amounts of interesting information. As a result, the 0.11.5 release is still only suitable for early adopters with some reasonable pain tolerance.

Read more

Foundations: Open Mobility Foundation, prpl Foundation, Cloud Native Computing Foundation and OpenChain (LF)

Filed under
OSS
  • Cities lead the way on open source tools for mobility

    The Open Mobility Foundation aims to evolve how cities better manage transportation today and in the future and develop and deploy digital mobility tools.

  • Open Mobility Foundation seeks to improve transportation with open source tools

    This morning, a host of U.S. cities and organizations — including Austin, Chicago, Los Angeles, Louisville, Miami-Dade County, Miami, Minneapolis, New York City DOT, New York City Taxi and Limo Commission, Philadelphia, Portland, San Francisco, San Jose, Santa Monica, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. — announced their participation in the newly formed Open Mobility Foundation (OMF), a nonprofit coalition that seeks to improve intercity transportation infrastructure with open source software tools. Escooter startup Bird also said it’ll join as a founding member.

  • GoodFirms Publishes Best Free & Open Source Software for Various Categories [Ed: Probably another marketing firm like Gartner, 'monetising' fake recommendation and lobbying services.]

    In this competitive world, running a business is an expensive endeavor, and none of the entrepreneurs can afford to take risks. But by thinking like a small business and taking the critical decisions and getting the things done can be a smart move. Thus, to help in this situation, GoodFirms.co has come up with ten blogs for entrepreneurs. In these blogs, you can find the various free business software that has been briefly introduced along with features to streamline your work and increase productivity.

  • ADTRAN Expands Participation in prpl Foundation—Open-Source Consortium Enabling the Security and Interoperability of Devices for the IoT and Smart Societies of the Future

    ADTRAN®, Inc., (ADTN), a leading provider of next-generation open networking and subscriber experience solutions, today announced it has joined the prpl Foundation—an open-source, community-driven, collaborative non-profit foundation that strives to enable the security and interoperability of embedded devices.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Announces DiDi as Winner of Top End User Award

    KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit China – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that DiDi, the world's leading multi-modal transportation platform, has won the CNCF End User Award in recognition of its contributions to the cloud native ecosystem.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Welcomes Ant Financial as Gold End User Member

    KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit China 2019 -- The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that Ant Financial has joined the Foundation as a Gold Member.

  • CNCF to Expand Scope of SIGs

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation announced at the KubeCon + Cloud Native + Open Source China Summit today that it is expanding the number of special interest groups (SIGs) surrounding Kubernetes, as part of an effort to accelerate development of critical complementary technologies.

    Dan Kohn, executive director for the CNCF, says it’s become apparent that the nine members of the technical oversight committee (TOC) for Kubernetes needs to be supported with expertise in specific areas. The first two SIGs to be formed will be focused on security and storage, followed by SIGs addressing network traffic, observability, governance, application delivery, core and applied architectures.

    [...]

    Kohn says as part of this initiative, one of the goals of the CNCF is to entice more developers to contribute to an increasing number of open source projects. Kohn estimates that well more than half the developers who leverage open source software don’t contribute to any project. Many of those developers are already creating forks to open source code every time they patch open source software on their own. Every time that software is updated—otherwise known as carrying your own patch—those developers have to reconstruct that patch. That issue would go away if the developers contributed their patches to the open source project, which would then ensure the issue is addressed as part of the life cycle of the project, he notes.

  • Wind River Becomes First to Achieve OpenChain 2.0 Conformance

    Wind River®, a leader in delivering software for critical infrastructure, today announced that it is certified on OpenChain version 2.0. It was also the first company to become OpenChain conformant.

    Hosted by the Linux Foundation, the OpenChain Project aims to build trust in open source by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent. By working through the OpenChain Specification conformance process and curriculum, open source license compliance becomes more predictable, understandable and efficient for all participants in the software supply chain.

Latest Openwashing

Filed under
OSS
  • Salesforce open sources research to advance state of the art in AI for common sense reasoning [Ed: Openwashing by proprietary software giants. How fashionable. The open source 'movement' lets them pretend to respect users whilst actually attacking them. They just tick some box.]
  • Energy sector gets first open-source, tailor-made blockchain [Ed: Hype wave + openwashing when greenwashing of energy companies ain't sufficient]

    A public enterprise grade energy blockchain has powered up with the promise to accelerate a low-carbon, distributed electricity future. For the first time, energy sector companies are hosting validator nodes on a decentralized network as they seek to adapt to a more digitalized and decentralized energy system.

  • Visa modernises B2B global payments through open source blockchain [Ed: Same for banks]
  • Securitize DS Token Protocol goes Open Source[Ed: It's a bloody protocol. This is not "Open Source" but more like API, i.e. dependency on something opaque and centralised]

    The security token issuance platform, Securitize raised eyebrows amongst the cryptocommunity this week after releasing its DS Token code to the public. The move goes along with the crypto sectors long-held stance of open-source projects. Now, programmers from across the globe have a chance to test and advance the platform’s core coding.

  • How SNIA is using Open Source to speed up storage standards

    Developing a storage standard has always been a long, arduous and contentious process. It is the same for most standards.

    However, with the speed that technology is changing, that approach is no longer sustainable, and not just for storage. To understand what change means for the storage industry, Enterprise Times talked with Richelle Ahlvers.

    Ahlvers is a board member at the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA). She is also the Chair of the Scalable Storage Management Technical Workgroup. That workgroup is responsible for the Swordfish Storage Management API. Already providing support for block and file storage, it will release support for object storage soon.

    [...]

    Another example that Ahlvers gave is the SNIA work on the CDMI (Cloud Data Management Interface). That spec is now entirely in Open Source. All the bug fixes and changes are done through the Open Source community which, Ahlvers says, makes it faster.

  • Norigin Media open-sources part of TV app technology [Ed: "Part of" means openwashing, i.e. they get to call it 'open' even though it is proprietary]

    TV technology outfit Norigin Media has open-sourced parts of its technology framework for building TV apps in an initiative the company said was aimed at increasing the quality of software across the streaming industry, and encouraging broadcasters to work together by reusing common code.

  • Norigin Media open sources parts of TV App framework
  • Norigin Media open sources TV App framework [Ed: Misleading. Only part was "opened". It's openwashing.]
  • Open Source: the secret sauce to business success [Ed: Why is it that Microsoft employees now become 'journalists' who write about FOSS (when the employer attacks FOSS)?]

    Software is at the heart of the digital revolution and, ultimately, it is what determines the success, agility and competitiveness of businesses looking to succeed in today’s fast paced, digital world.

    Open source is changing the way organisations build software, offering a strong and critical foundation for digital transformation, while bringing teams and departments together. As the approach to in-house software development evolves, organisations understand that their success is determined by the way they participate in Open Source Software (OSS). This offers a realm of opportunities that do not just benefit the IT department, but the business at large.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • D-Wave Releases of D-Wave Hybrid Workflow Platform to Open Source

    D-Wave Hybrid is designed to simplify and accelerate developers’ ability to build and run algorithms across classical and quantum systems, continuing D-Wave’s work to help customers with their real-world application development.

  • D-Wave’s open source platform for quantum-classical hybrid apps hits general availability

    D-Wave today announced the general availability of D-Wave Hybrid, its open source hybrid workflow platform for building and running quantum-classical hybrid applications. You can download D-Wave Hybrid, which is part of the company’s Ocean SDK, from GitHub.

  • Free, open-source virtual modular synth VCV Rack updated to v1.0

    Since its 2017 launch, VCV Rack has helped newbies step into modular synthesis, presenting a free, open-source software that simulates Eurorack on your desktop. VCV Rack has now been updated to version 1.0, which adds powerful features such as 16-voice polyphony, MIDI mapping and more.

    Important to note is that the software retains its intuitive module-patching feature, letting you add and connect both free and purchased modules creatively. What’s neat about v1.0, however, is support for polyphony of up to 16 voices, giving you the ability to produce thicker textures.

  • Healthcare Design Studio, GoInvo Celebrates 15th Anniversary with Release of Open Source Visualizations

    To celebrate 15 years in business, GoInvo, a digital health design consultancy headquartered in Arlington, Massachusetts, today announced the release of two new open source health projects, "Who Uses My Health Data?", and "Precision Medicine Timeline", both of which are available to all for use or modification, under a Creative Commons Attribution v3 license or MIT license.

  • “No Loss” Lotto Comes to Ethereum: Builders Commit to Open-Sourcing the Code

    A “no loss” lottery built atop Ethereum — PoolTogether — quickly generated buzz in cryptocurrency circles this week in being the newest DeFi project on the block.

    Yet the lotto’s hype was met with an initial wave of skepticism, too, as some cryptoverse stakeholders cautioned against using the dapp while its code remained closed-source. That caution was fair, and it got the PoolTogether team’s attention in short order.

  • Qwant Maps: open source Google Maps alternative launches

    Qwant, the French search engine that respects users privacy, has launched a beta version of Qwant Maps, a, you guessed it, privacy respecting mapping service.

    Qwant Maps is an open source project that anyone may contribute to. The data is hosted on GitHub and developers may run their own version by following the instructions on the project website.

    The beta version of the mapping service supports desktop and mobile access, and it works similarly to how other mapping services such as Google Maps, Bing Maps, or OpenStreetMap work.

  • Fans resurrect Super Mario Bros Royale as a free open-source project, available to play

    What this ultimately means is that there is a playable free open-source version of Super Mario Bros Royale, known as Mario Royale, available now to play.

  • DBS Bank goes big on open source

    Besides using a slew of open source software, DBS Bank is looking to contribute some of its own projects to the open source community in future

  • The financial services industry is the next great frontier for open source

    Open source software is a driver of the democratization of technology, opening doors, and leveling the playing field for many industries. However, financial services has been a rare exception: financial institutions have tended to rely on their own technology development and operation.
    In a sector that has traditionally served the few and not the many, open source could be the key to make financial services more inclusive for the 2 billion people and 200 million small businesses around the world lacking access to basic services such as banking and lending.
    In a report published by Gartner, global enterprise IT spending in the banking and securities market was estimated to have grown by 4.6% in 2018 in constant US dollars. Banking and securities firms remain steadfast as they continue to prioritize digital transformation. But it has largely been major global banks that have the resources and ability to throw their hats into the ring of technology development—smaller regional banks have tended to stay on the sidelines.

  • Should you be banking on open source analytics?

    Banks see open source as a hotbed of innovation – and a governance nightmare. Do the rewards outweigh the risks? Open source software used to be treated almost as a joke in the financial services sector.

    If you wanted to build a new system, you bought tried and tested, enterprise-grade software from a large, reputable vendor. You didn’t gamble with your customers’ trust by adopting tools written by small groups of independent programmers. Especially with no formal support contracts and no guarantees that they would continue to be maintained in the future.

    Fast-forward to today, and the received wisdom seems to have turned on its head. Why invest in expensive proprietary software when you can use an open source equivalent for free? Why wait months for the official release of a new feature when you can edit the source code and add it yourself? And why lock yourself into a vendor relationship when you can create your own version of the tool and control your own destiny?

  • Algorand, a Dapp Analytics Suite, Goes Open Source

    Algorand, a permission-less, proof-of-stake blockchain and technology company, announced that their node repository is now open source.

    Part of Algorand’s ongoing mission to develop and promote a decentralized blockchain, the company has made several of its projects open source over the past year, including a Verifiable Random Function and their Developer SDKs.

    The blockchain’s nodes are run by diverse entities — businesses, individuals, and consortiums — spread across many countries, according to the company website. The decentralized voting mechanism pools and randomly selects these users to develop a unique committee to approve every block.

  • [Old] On Usage of The Phrase "Open Source"

    It is unfortunate that for some time the Open Source Initiative deprecated Richard Stallman and Free Software, and that some people still consider Open Source and Free Software to be different things today. I never meant it to be that way. Open Source was meant to be a way of promoting the concept of Free Software to business people, who I have always hoped would thus come to appreciate Richard and his Free Software campaign. And many have. Open Source licenses and Free Software licenses are effectively the same thing.

Open Hardware/Modding: RISC-V, EDA, ACEINNA, Arduino and ESP32

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open Source Processors: Fact Or Fiction?

    Open source processors are rapidly gaining mindshare, fueled in part by early successes of RISC-V, but that interest frequently is accompanied by misinformation based on wishful thinking and a lack of understanding about what exactly open source entails.

    Nearly every recent conference has some mention of RISC-V in particular, and open source processors in general, whether that includes keynote speeches, technical sessions, and panels. What’s less obvious is that open ISAs are not a new phenomenon, and neither are free, open processor implementations.

  • Will Open-Source EDA Work?

    Open-source EDA is back on the semiconductor industry’s agenda, spurred by growing interest in open-source hardware. But whether the industry embraces the idea with enough enthusiasm to make it successful is not clear yet.

    One of the key sponsors of this effort is the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), which is spearheading a number of programs to lower the cost of chip design, including one for advanced packaging and another for security. The idea behind all of them is to utilize knowledge extracted from millions of existing chip designs to make chip engineering more affordable and predictable.

  • Why Autonomous Vehicle Developers Are Embracing Open Source

    There's a growing trend of autonomous vehicle developers open-sourcing their software tools and hardware, even for applications outside of automotive.

  • Rugged open-source inertial measurement unit sensor offers affordable and rugged solution

    ACEINNA offers the new OpenIMU300RI. The device is a rugged, open-source, sealed-package, 9-DOF IMU for autonomous off-road, construction, agricultural and automotive vehicle applications. This new open-source IMU enables engineers to simply optimise an attitude, navigation or other algorithm for their vehicle/application and run it in on the IMU.

    [...]

    “Different vehicle platforms have different dynamics,” explains James Fennelly, product manager at ACEINNA. “To get the best performance, the attitude, navigation or other algorithm needs to be tailored for each vehicle platform and application. The ACEINNA OpenIMU300RI open-source platform gives designers a flexible and simple-to-integrate IMU solution that can be easily optimized for a wide range of vehicles and applications.”

  • Open Source ESP32 3D Printer Board Supports Marlin 2.0 Firmware
  • The Octopus is a 5K full frame open source camera that lets you swap out sensors

    Now that digital imaging sensors are starting to become more freely available to the masses, all kinds of open source projects have been popping up that use them. Most of them are typically fairly limited to things like the Raspberry Pi or development boards like the Arduino and ESP32.

    But now, there is a new and pretty serious looking open source camera out there. It’s called the Octopus, it has interchangeable sensors that go up to 5K full frame, it’s fully programmable and runs on the open source operating system, Linux.

  • ScopeFun open source all-in-one instrumentation

    ScopeFun has launched a new project via Crowd Supply for their open source all-in-one instrumentation hardware aptly named the ScopeFun. ScopeFun Has been created to provide an affordable platform that offers the following tools : Oscilloscope, Arbitrary waveform generator, Spectrum analyzer, Logic analyzer and Digital pattern generator .

    The hardware supports any accompanying software runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac and also provides a Server Mode that supports remote connections over an IP network. “A Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA and a Cypress EZ-USB FX3 controller allow the board to interface with a PC while maintaining fast data rates. Samples are buffered using 512 Megabytes of DDR3 SDRAM.

  • Bloom Chair is an open source furniture that lets you design your own piece

    Call it modular, call it DIY, call it I-have-control-over-my-interiors; the purpose of the Bloom Chair is to let you customize your chair, just the way you like it to be. It’s a collaborative effort between you and the manufacturer, where you get to download the modular design, cut it yourself and finally assemble it. While you make your piece, you have the liberty of modifying the pattern and making the end-shape define your vision. Haffun!

CMS: Acquia, Drupal and Top CMS Platforms

Filed under
Server
OSS
Drupal
  • Digital experience firm Acquia sees India as a global delivery centre

    Acquia, a US-based open source digital experience company, has announced the opening of an office in Pune, expanding its presence in the Asia-Pacific region. Taking this next step in its global growth strategy, Acquia looks to bolster its partner network and expand its global customer footprint.

  • EPAM Named An Acquia Global Select Partner, Joining Elite Group Of Partners

    EPAM Systems, Inc. (EPAM), a leading global provider of digital platform engineering and software development services, today announced that it has achieved Global Select status in Acquia's Partner Program. Acquia, an open source digital experience company, provides software and services built around Drupal. As one of only a few elite Global Select partners, EPAM leverages its Acquia and Drupal expertise to help its clients design, build and deliver engaging and intelligent customer experiences.

  • The Top 13 Free and Open Source Content Management Platforms

    This is the most complete and up-to-date directory of free and open source content management platforms available on the web.

  • 4 great Java-based CMS options

    OpenCms has been around since 1999, and it's been an open source Java CMS platform since 2001. Not only is it one of the oldest Java-based CMS platforms, it's one of the oldest CMS tools, predating the popular PHP-based WordPress, which debuted in 2003.

    From a developer's perspective, OpenCms is simple to set up and maintain. It runs as a Java servlet, which makes installation easy. It works with most major databases; whether you prefer MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server, MariaDB or another popular database, you can likely run OpenCms without much hassle.

    OpenCms probably won't win awards as the most elegant or attractive Java-based CMS. The interface was overhauled in 2019, but OpenCms doesn't exactly feel modern. It works, but it's a little clunky.

    However, OpenCms does enjoy the distinction as a truly cost-free open source Java CMS. There is no freemium pricing model for the product, and there are no licensing fees.

Linux 5.2-rc7

Filed under
Linux

It's Sunday afternoon _somewhere_ in the world right now. In
particular, in the middle of nowhere on a boat.

I didn't expect to have any internet this week, and honestly, I
haven't had much, and not fast. But enough to keep up with critical
pull requests, and enough to push out an rc.

But credit for the internet goes to Disk Hohndel and vmware, because
I'm mooching off his phone hotspot WiFi to do this.

Anyway, It's been _fairly_ calm. Would I have hoped for even calmer
with my crappy internet? Sure. But hey, it's a lot smaller than rc6
was and I'm not really complaining.

Read more

Also: Linux 5.2-rc7 Is Quiet & Released On A Boat Somewhere

More in Tux Machines

Pumpkins, markets, and one bad Apple

Imagine your local farmers market: every Saturday the whole town comes together to purchase fresh and homemade goods, enjoy the entertainment, and find that there is always something for everyone. Whatever you need, you can find it here, and anyone can sign up to have their own little stand. It is a wonderful place, or so it seems. Now, imagine starting out as a pumpkin farmer, and you want to sell your pumpkins at this market. The market owner asks 30% of every pumpkin that you sell. It's steep, but the market owner -- we'll call him Mr. Apple -- owns all the markets in your area, so you have little choice. Let's continue this analogy and imagine that, since it is a little hard for you to make ends meet, you decide to tell your customers that they can come visit you at your farm to purchase pumpkins. Mr. Apple overhears and shuts your stand down. You explain that your business cannot be profitable this way, but the grumpy market owner says that you can either comply or find another place. At the end of your rope, you look for information about starting your own farmers market, but it seems Mr. Apple owns every building in town. In the midst of Apple announcing its new products, attention is drawn away from its ongoing battle to maintain its subjugation over users globally. The Netherlands’ Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM) last month informed the U.S. technology giant of its decision that the rules around the in-app payment system are anticompetitive, making it the first antitrust regulator to conclude that the company has abused market power in the App Store. And while Apple is appealing this verdict, the European Union is charging the company with another antitrust claim concerning the App Store. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 - howtodojo

    In this tutorial, we learn how to install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). PostgreSQL, or usually called Postgres, is an open-source object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) with an emphasis on extensibility and standards compliance. PostgreSQL is ACID-compliant and transactional. It is developed by PostgreSQL Global Development Group (PGDG) that consists of many companies and individual contributors. PostgreSQL released under the terms of PostgreSQL license.

  • How to Install Minikube on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    Minikube is open source software for setting up a single-node Kubernetes cluster on your local machine. The software starts up a virtual machine and runs a Kubernetes cluster inside of it, allowing you to test in a Kubernetes environment locally. Minikube is a tool that runs a single-node Kubernetes cluster in a virtual machine on your laptop. In this tutorial we will show you how to install Minikube on CentOS 8.

  • How to Install and Secure Redis on Ubuntu 20.04 | RoseHosting

    Redis (short for Remote Dictionary Server), is an open-source in-memory data structure store. It’s used as a flexible, highly available key-value database that maintains a high level of performance. It helps to reduce time delays and increase the performance of your application by accessing in microseconds.

  • How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 - OMG! Ubuntu!

    If the glowing reviews for the Ubuntu 21.10 release have you intrigued, here’s how to upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 from an earlier version. Fair warning: this tutorial is super straightforward (the benefits of upgrading after a stable release, rather than a little bit before). Meaning no, you don’t need to be a Linux guru to get going! There are plenty of good reasons to upgrade from Ubuntu 21.04 to Ubuntu 21.10, such as benefiting from a newer Linux kernel, enjoying a new GNOME desktop, sampling the new Yaru Light theme, and getting to go hands-on with an able assortment of updated apps.

  • How to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4 - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at how to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4. Enjoy!

  • Jenkins: How to add a JDK version - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will show you how to add a JDK version to Jenkins. If you plan to run a Java build requiring a specific version of the Java Development Kit, you need to do this.

  • Sending EmailsSend them from Linux Terminal? | Linux Journal

    Does your job require sending a lot of emails on a daily basis? And you often wonder if or how you can send email messages from the Linux terminal. This article explains about 6 different ways of sending emails using the Linux terminal. Let’s go through them.

Development version: GIMP 2.99.8 Released

GIMP 2.99.8 is our new development version, once again coming with a huge set of improvements. Read more Some early coverage:

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released with Clone Tool Tweaks, Support for Windows Ink

    A new development version of GIMP is available to download and it carries some interesting new features. While this isn’t a new stable release — GIMP 2.10.28 is the most recent stable release (and the version you’ll find in Ubuntu 21.10’s archives) — the release of GIMP 2.99.8 is yet another brick in the road to the long-fabled GIMP 3.0 release. And it’s a fairly substantial brick, at that.

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released As Another Step Toward The Long Overdue GIMP 3.0

    GIMP 3.0 as the GTK3 port of this open-source Adobe Photoshop alternative has been talked about for nearly a decade now and the work remains ongoing. However, out today is GIMP 2.99.8 as the newest development snapshot.

Mozilla: Six-Year Moziversary, Thomas Park/Codepip, and Weak Response to Critics of Firefox Spyware

  • Chris H-C: Six-Year Moziversary

    I’ve been working at Mozilla for six years today. Wow. Okay, so what’s happened… I’ve been promoted to Staff Software Engineer. Georg and I’d been working on that before he left, and then, well *gestures at everything*. This means it doesn’t really _feel_ that different to be a Staff instead of a Senior since I’ve been operating at the latter level for over a year now, but the it’s nice that the title caught up. Next stop: well, actually, I think Staff’s a good place for now. Firefox On Glean did indeed take my entire 2020 at work, and did complete on time and on budget. Glean is now available to be used in Firefox Desktop.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Hacks Decoded: Thomas Park, Founder of Codepip

    Thomas Park is a software developer based in the U.S. (Philadelphia, specifically). Previously, he was a teacher and researcher at Drexel University and even worked at Mozilla Foundation for a stint. Now, he’s the founder of Codepip, a platform that offers games that teach players how to code. Park has made a couple games himself: Flexbox Froggy and Grid Garden.

  • Mark Surman: Exploring better data stewardship at Mozilla [Ed: Mozilla fails to admit that spying on Firefox users is wrong; now it's misframing the criticism and responds to a straw man]

    Over the last few years, Mozilla has increasingly turned its attention to the question of ‘how we build more trustworthy AI?’ Data is at the core of this question. Who has our data? What are they using it for? Do they have my interests in mind, or only their own? Do I trust them? We decided earlier this year that ‘better data stewardship’ should be one of the three big areas of focus for our trustworthy AI work. One part of this focus is supporting the growing field of people working on data trusts, data cooperatives and other efforts to build trust and shift power dynamics around data. In partnership with Luminate and Siegel, we launched the Mozilla Data Futures Lab in March as a way to drive this part of the work.