Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

June 2019

Standards/Consortia: USB, HTML and DisplayPort

Filed under
Misc
  • USB inventor explains why it would have been too expensive to make it reversible

    Ajay Bhatt, who worked on Intel's implementation of the USB standard recently spoke to US public radio (NPR) about the invention of USB, and why the flip it wasn't reversible in the first place.

  • HTML is the Web

    It’s all about what gets consumed by the consumer. It’s the UI and UX. It’s the whole package. In descending order of importance it's the HTML, the CSS, and the behaviour (which might be provided by the Javascript - might not be).

    My big concern is at the bottom of that technology pyramid. The lowest common denominator of the Web. The foundation. The rhythm section. The ladyfingers in the Web trifle. It’s the HTML. And it is becoming increasingly clear to me that there’s a whole swathe of Frontend Engineers who don’t know or understand the frontend-est of frontend technologies.

  • The cost of JavaScript in 2019

    On mobile, you’ll want to ship a lot less script because of network, memory consumption and execution time for slower CPUs. Balance latency with cacheability to maximize the amount of parsing and compilation work that can happen off the main thread.

  • DisplayPort 2.0 launches, promising 8K video support by late 2020

    In late 2020, the first products incorporating the new DP 2.0 standard are expected to be made available, according to the Video Electronics Standards Association, or VESA. DP 2.0 can use the existing DP connector that appears on many high-end desktop PCs, or be carried over cabling that uses the standard USB-C connector—though you’ll still need a PC with DP 2.0 silicon to support it.

Slimbook’s Latest Linux Laptop is Faster (and Cheaper) than a MacBook Air

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Slimbook Pro X bills itself as the ‘best Linux Laptop in the world’ — a bold claim, but does it hold up?

Well, on paper at least, it looks like it might.

The latest Linux portable from Spanish computer company Slimbook certainly sports enough muscle to give many well-known laptop a run for their money.

In fact, overall, the Slimbook Pro X looks better spec’d and costs less than the latest MacBook Air, seen by many as the ultimate on-the-go laptop.

So what makes the Pro X seemingly exceptional? Let’s take a look…

Read more

Mozilla: Firefox UX, GeckoView and Firefox for Android

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox UX: The 11 Secrets of Iterative and Incremental Product Development – A lightining talk

    Something I really like about the Firefox UX team is how we are all open to learning from each other.
    So, when one of my colleagues shared this specific image in our Slack channel, I knew it was OK to raise the question of why this picture is incorrect.

  • GeckoView in 2019

    Last September we wrote about using GeckoView to bring Firefox’s rendering engine to Android as a reusable library. By decoupling the Gecko engine from the Firefox application, we’ve created a newer, faster, and more maintainable way to create Android applications. This approach leverages Gecko’s excellent performance, privacy, and support for cutting-edge web standards.

    With today’s release of our GeckoView-powered Firefox Preview, we’d like to share an update on what we’ve accomplished and where GeckoView is going in 2019.

  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: Reinventing Firefox for Android: a Preview

    At Firefox, we’re passionate about providing solutions for people who care about safety, privacy and independence. For several months, we’ve been working on a new strategy for our Android products to serve you even better. Today we’re very happy to announce a pilot of our new browser for Android devices that is available to early adopters for testing as of now. We’ll have a feature-rich, polished version of this flagship application available for this fall.

    [...]

    With Firefox Preview, we’re combining the best of what our lightweight Focus application and our current mobile browsers have to offer to create a best in class mobile experience. The new application is powered by Firefox’s own mobile browser engine — GeckoView — the same high-performance, feature enabling motor that fuels our Focus app.

    You might remember how we revamped the engine behind the Firefox desktop browser in 2017 enabling us to significantly improve the desktop user experience. As a result, today’s Firefox Quantum is much faster, more efficient, equipped with a modern user interface and clearly the next-gen Firefox. Quite similarly, implementing GeckoView paves the way for a complete makeover of the mobile Firefox experience. While all other major Android browsers today are based on Blink and therefore reflective of Google’s decisions about mobile, Firefox’s GeckoView engine ensures us and our users independence. Building Firefox for Android on GeckoView also results in greater flexibility in terms of the types of privacy and security features we can offer our mobile users. With GeckoView we have the ability to develop faster, more secure and more user friendly browsers that deliver unprecedented performance.

Slax 9.9.1 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I am happy to let you know that new Slax version has been released.

Read more

Canonical/Ubuntu: Snaps, Valve and Lubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Development tips and tricks – snap try and snapcraft pack

    Over the past several months, we have shared with you several articles and tutorials showing how to accelerate application development so that a typically demanding, time-consuming process becomes an easier, faster and more fun one. Today, we’d like to introduce some additional tips and tricks. Namely, we want to talk about elegant ways you can streamline the final steps of a snap build.

    [...]

    Side by side with snap try, you can use the snapcraft pack command. It lets you create a snap from a directory holding a valid snap (the layout of the target directory must contain a meta/snap.yaml file). Going back to our previous example, you would alter the contents of your project directory, add assets (like libraries), and then pack those into a squashfs file.

  • Valve to continue Steam gaming on Ubuntu Linux

    When Canonical announced that, beginning with October's Ubuntu 19.10 release, 32-bit -computer support would be dropped, it didn't expect there would be much blowback. It was wrong. Developers and users, especially of Steam games, threw fits. So, Canonical, makers of Ubuntu Linux, reversed course and asserted it wouldn't drop 32-bit software support in Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS after all. 

    So, everything's back to normal, yes? No.

    True, Valve will continue to support Ubuntu. But Ubuntu will no longer be called out as "as the best-supported path for desktop users." Instead, Valve is re-thinking how it wants to approach distribution support going forward. There are several distributions on the market today that offer a great gaming desktop experience such as Arch Linux, Manjaro, Pop!_OS, Fedora, and many others.

  • Donate to Lubuntu!

    Lubuntu is a community-developed project that relies on support from the community to continue development. There are specific costs we would like to address to take the burden off of specific contributors, their employers, and the Ubuntu project as a whole. Specifically, Altispeed Technologies has graciously provided hosting support for our Phabricator instance, forum, and other pieces of critical Lubuntu infrastructure. We would like to eventually move off of Altispeed’s infrastructure, or be able to pay for the infrastructure ourselves.

    Additionally, Lubuntu Developers attend several major Linux conferences each year, specifically LinuxFest NorthWest, the Seattle GNU/Linux Conference, SouthEast LinuxFest, and others. Lubuntu would like to be able to support some of these conferences and trips to these conferences without relying so much on e.g. the Ubuntu Community Donations Funding.

System76: Latest News, Coreboot Support, and Working Upstream

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Announcing our Summer Flock Party Event, and more news from June!

    Summer is here, so we’re having a Flock Party! Now until July 9th, join us on our website for discounts on laptops and desktops, and even more discounts with upgrades!
    To make our Flock Party even more colorful, we’ve enlisted the help of 17 parrots to hide out around our site. If you’re one of the first 10 to find them all and unscramble the code, we’ll have something special for you!
    Along with our parrot mania, we have info for you on hardware, Pop!_OS, firmware, and Thelio manufacturing. Read on to see what’s new in June!

  • System76 Continues Advancing Coreboot Support, Adding UI For Firmware Updates

    We've known that Linux PC vendor System76 has been investing engineering resources into Coreboot support and while not yet ready for end-users, they are making progress. For once it's ready for their customers, they have also begun crafting a graphical user-interface for these firmware upgrades to Coreboot.

    In System76's monthly news letter, they commented that their "open firmware" has entered testing on their Gazelle notebooks but remains in the early stages. As well, a UI element for managing firmware updates is being worked on and will be available through GNOME Settings. No word yet if System76 has decided to make use of Fwupd+LVFS, but in the past they've expressed various reasons for not doing so.

  • System76 / Pop! OS team should learn to work with their upstreams

    System76 / Pop! OS team, while you should be proud of the work you do for you users I think you are going the wrong way there. Working on fixes and including them early in your product is one thing, not upstreaming those fixes and using that for marketing you as better than your upstreams is a risky game. You might be overlooking that now, but divergence has a cost, as does not having good relationship with your upstreams.

Two new Howchip dev kits feature Nexell Cortex-A7 and -A9 SoCs

Filed under
Android
GNU
Hardware

Howchip, which last year launched a Nano-ITX form factor ExSOM-8895 DVK featuring Samsung’s octa-core Exynos 8895, has now unveiled a pair of similarly sandwich-style development kits based on compute modules running on 28nm Nexell processors. The NXP3220-based Scorpion3 DVK runs Linux 4.14 and the NXP4330Q-based Scorpion5 SDK runs Android 7.1. Both boards offer optional 8- and 10.1-inch capacitive touchscreens, and the Scorpion3 also has a 10.4-inch resistive touchscreen option.

Read more

Intel Xeon Cascade Lake Compiler Performance - GCC 9/10 vs. LLVM Clang 8/9

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

At least for the newest Intel Xeon "Cascade Lake" processors, the LLVM Clang compiler is running incredibly well compared to the long-standing GNU Compiler Collection (GCC). Overall, LLVM clang is now nearly at performance parity to GCC 9 and the in-development GCC 10 compilers. Here are some Linux compiler benchmarks using the dual Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 server built around the Gigabyte S3461-3R0.

Read more

Also: Intel-based box computer has expansion unit with PCIe slots

More in Tux Machines

Inside KDE: leadership and long-term planning

Based on my post about KDE’s anarchic organization and the micro-not-macro nature of my This Week in KDE series, you would be forgiven for having the impression that KDE is directionless and has no leadership or long-term planning capabilities. In fact the opposite is true, and I’d like to talk a bit about that today, since this information may not be obvious to users and the wider community. Now, since KDE is so vast, I can only provide my personal perspective based on the projects I’m most heavily involved in: the VDG, Plasma, and a few apps. [...] KDE doesn’t lack for strategic long-term goals and direction, so I think that part can be pretty solidly marked as a success. As for tactical leadership and direction within and between individual projects, I also think things are pretty rosy overall. KDE’s maintainer-led projects generally have excellent maintainers. The variety of KDE apps using this model model is a testament to how successful it can be with a high-quality maintainer–especially our professional-class apps like Krita. And in my opinion, KDE’s council of elders projects also have very good leadership today Read more

today's howtos

  • Installing PHP 8 on Debian 10

    PHP is a general-purpose open-source scripting language that can be embedded in HTML. It stands for HypertextProcessor and is widely used in web development. A scripting language is used to write ready-made programs that are later used to automate tasks. PHP scripts are often used on Linux, Unix, Windows, Mac OS, and other operating systems. With PHP, you have the freedom to choose an operating system and the underlying web server, according to your needs. In this article, we will explain how to install PHP 8, PHP 7.4, and PHP 5.6 on Debian. After you have installed the multiple PHP versions, we will also explain how to disable one version and choose a default version on the system.

  • Install a minimal KDE on Debian 10 "buster" - PragmaticLinux

    If you select the KDE desktop environment, while installing Debian, the installer installs several extra desktop applications. Kmail, Knotes, Korganizer, Kaddressbook, to name just a few. Not all KDE users are interested in these extra desktop applications. However, when attempting to remove them, Debian removes the entire KDE. Luckily, a method exists to install just a minimal version of KDE in Debian. Grab yourself a drink and read on to find out how you can install a minimal KDE on Debian.

  • How to delete container with lxc (LXD) command on Linux - nixCraft

    Explains how to delete and remove LXD based container or instance with the lxc command on Linux operating systems using the CLI.

  • Building Resilient Microservices with Istio and Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh (Course DO328)
  • Understanding Linux File Permissions and Ownership – Linux Hint

    Linux operating system, which is a clone of UNIX, is developed to handle multiple users with multi-tasking features. This means than more than one user can work in this operating at the same time when the computer is attached to a network or Internet. The remote users can connect with the computer that contains the Linux operating system through SSH and work on the system. It is very important to maintain security when multiple users work in the same operating system at the same time. Many built-in security features exist in the Linux operating system that can be used when local or remote access is granted from different users. The Linux users have to understand the concept of file permissions and the ownership of the file to provide security at the file system level. How the Linux users can view and modify the permissions, and the ownership of the file and folders is shown in this article.

Python Programming

  • Python uppercase string – Linux Hint

    The upper() function translates all the lowercase characters in a string into uppercase and returns the string. The upper() function is an integral function in Python. In certain cases, the upper() function is very useful. For example, if we are developing a university management system and want to convert the name of all the students into uppercase letters, in this case, we will definitely use the upper() function. This article explains the use of the upper() function with the help of simple examples.

  • Basics of Parsing Command Line Arguments in Python | FOSS Linux

    Command-line applications are one of the oldest and most used types of apps. If you are an experienced Linux user, you may have hardly used GUI tools instead of command-line tools to do the same task. For example, Anaconda, the package manager for python, has command-line tools named conda and GUI tool named anaconda navigator.

  • How To Take A Screenshot Using Python & Selenium? | Codementor

    The goto software framework for any web developer looking for an open-source, free test automation tool is Selenium. It is used with various programming languages, including Java, Python, PHP, Perl, and C#. Selenium can also be used as a web-scraping tool or to create a human-replica bot to automate social-media or even test PDF files ! Geeks at Google & Thoughtworks are highly credited for its development and maintenance. In this Python Selenium screenshot tutorial, we are going to explore different ways of taking screenshots using Selenium’s Python bindings. Before we hop-on to capturing Python Selenium screenshots, let’s first acquaint ourselves with Selenium Python bindings.

  • The More, the Better — Why Become a Multi-Language Programmer | Codementor

    Are you just taking your first step into web development, and you want to learn programming? Discover the benefits of learning more than one programming language.

  • Datacamp Review 2020 - PythonForBeginners.com

    DataCamp is the best source of reference material for data science. It is the first online learning platform dedicated to providing data science training to professionals seeking the knowledge and understanding of the topic. Established in 2014, DataCamp is a MOOC-providing platform. MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Courses meaning that the company specializes in providing online courses to students all over the world. In this Datacamp review, I am going to tell how easy it is to use DataCamp then touch on the quality of courses offered. I’ll follow with telling you about some of the features you will find with DataCamp and how you can start exploring DataCamp for free before finishing up the review with the pricing and whether or not it is worth paying for DataCamp.

  • How To: Simple HTTP Server with Python

    When building new infrastructure elements and deploying servers, quite often you need to test firewall rules before the rest of application stack is deployed. The basic tool of my choice here is curl which is great to testing TCP connections. But it has an important dependency: you actually need to have something listening on the other end of the connection you’re testing. If there’s no software running and servicing the port you specify, you will receive an error. Traditionally there have been small programs or scripts you’d write - first (many years ago now) in C, later in Perl. They would imply that you have to bring your test code or compiled binary to the server you need to test. Today I’d like to share a super easy way to start a basic HTTP server with Python - it’s literally just one line that will work in most cases since Python is now ubiqutous enough to be installed by default in most Linux distributions.

Magazines and Shows: Linux Format, Firewalls, Destination Linux and mintCast

  • Linux IS fun! | Linux Format

    Some people have gained the impression that Linux might not be fun. How did that happen? So this issue we’re putting the fun back into Lin(f)u(n)x! We’re not sure that’s going to catch on… This issue we’re going to look at Plex. While no longer open source, it’s always treated Linux as a first-class citizen and delivers a super-slick media streaming experience across networks, devices and all media. You can use it for free and if you get on with it there are membership levels that unlock extra features and app access. It’s certainly a system that works for Plex.

  • Enabling A Firewall Is Easy In Linux - YouTube

    I am going to show you how to install and enable the Uncomplicated Firewall (ufw) and how to add and delete rules for it. Ufw is a very easy-to-use command line utility, and for those that want a graphical tool, gufw is available as well.

  • Destination Linux 196: Going Sub-Atomic With Quantum Computing - Destination Linux

    This week We’re going to take a look at what’s new for KDE’s latest Plasma 5.20 release! We’re going visit the Quantum Realm to discuss Quantum Computing and an article Red Hat released about the subject including what sysadmins will need to do to manage in this new realm without an Ant Man suit. In our gaming section, we’re going to be howling at the moon because this week we’ll be checking out Werewolf: The Apocalypse — Heart of the Forest. Later in the show, we’ll give you our popular tips/tricks and software picks. Plus so much more, on this week’s episode of Destination Linux.

  • mintCast 346 – It’s Not You, It’s Me – mintCast

    First up, in our Wanderings, Leo makes web apps, Moss sends a Telegram, Joe gets an upgrade, Josh fights with a mic, and Bo gets a gnome.