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June 2019

Raspbian Based On Debian 10 Offering Up Some Performance Improvements For Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Alongside this week's announcement of the Raspberry Pi 4, the Raspberry Pi Foundation also released a new Raspbian operating system release that is re-based from Debian 9 Stretch to the soon-to-be-released Debian 10 Buster. In benchmarking of these new and old Raspbian releases on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B Plus, there are performance gains to find even if not jumping to the Raspberry Pi 4.

With the newly-released Raspbian 10, they have pulled in all of the latest Debian Buster package updates, which are quite meaningful compared to the rather stale state in the Debian 9 archive. Raspbian had already been offering a Linux 4.19 based kernel for the Raspberry Pi boards, so there isn't much of a kernel difference (just a slight 4.19.23 to 4.19.42 bump) but there are prominent upgrades like moving from the GCC 6.3 to GCC 8.3 compilers and various user-space application upgrades.

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Escuelas Linux Is Much More Than an Enlightened Linux Retread

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Escuelas Linux is a surprisingly good all-purpose distro despite its emphasis on education-specific software. However, its universal appeal is critically hampered by its Spanish- and English-only editions. You can always uninstall educational packages not to your liking or need.

Expect to take some time getting familiar with the Moksha desktop. That is my primary concern for younger students and others not familiar with any computer system.

I spent many years as an educator pushing computer technology in the classroom. Students' computing skills (with the exception of gaming) were often greatly lacking.

Moksha is not difficult to master. Yet I cringe at the thought of students and other users getting up to speed on the Moksha UI for hands-on productivity in the classroom and at home. Many of the specialty features built into Escuelas Linux will help teachers and system admins reduce the UI distractions.

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Arm-based HMI voice control kit targets industrial applications

Filed under
Linux

Renesas announced an industrial voice control “RZ/G Solution for HMI” kit that runs Linux and Sensory’s TrulyHandsfree voice stack on iWave’s Renesas RZ/G1E-based iW-RainboW-G22D module. There’s also a mic and a 4.3-inch LCD.

Renesas has partnered with Sensory, Shinko Shoji Co., and iWave to develop a voice control and speaker ID interface for industrial environments. The RZ/G Solution for HMI supports local voice processing without requiring a cloud connection. Renesas also recently previewed a power efficient CNN accelerator for edge AI (see farther below).

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Plans for IBM's Version of Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Upcoming features in Fedora 31 Workstation

    The Fedora Workstation edition is a fabulous operating system that includes everything a developer needs. But it’s also a perfect solution for anyone who wants to be productive online with their desktop or laptop computer. It features a sleek interface and an enormous catalog of ready-to-install software. Recently, Christian Schaller shared information about what’s coming in the Workstation for Fedora 31.

    Fedora 31 is currently scheduled for release in late October 2019. With it, as usual, will come an assortment of new and refreshed free and open source software. This includes the GNOME desktop which is planned to be updated to the latest 3.34.

    Under the hood of the desktop, many intrepid open source developers have been toiling away.

  • Fedora 31 to drop 32-bit kernel, retain support for 32-bit programs

    Proposed changes to a future version of the popular Linux distribution will decrease maintenance overhead while retaining support for 32-bit programs.

Qt Creator 4.10 Beta2 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.10 Beta2 !

Most notably we fixed a regression in the signing options for iOS devices, and that the “Build Android APK” step from existing Android projects was not restored.
As always you find more details in our change log.

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GNOME/Desktop: Xfway and GSoC with GNOME

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Xfway Aims To Provide A Wayland Compositor Inspired By Xfce's Xfwm4

    While it doesn't appear to be an official part of Xfce at least at this time, Xfway is a Wayland compositor inspired by Xfce's Xfwm4 window manager.

    Xfway was pointed out on the Wayland mailing list for this Xfce window manager inspired compositor.

    The code appears to have started out from the Weston code-base but adding support for Sway's WLROOTS among other changes inspired from Xfwm4.

  • GSoC with GNOME - Weeks 1 & 2

    The meson port for libgdata has been long due, and it was direly needed this time since Autotools 1.16.1 breaks an older API in such a way that at configure time, you get this issue. Moreover, even though you configure with --disable-dependency-tracking, at compile time you’re gifted with yet another error - Makefile:4517: *** missing separator. Stop.

    The issue stems from the fact that AX_CODE_COVERAGE recently changed the way it embeds code coverage rules in its outputted Makefile, i.e. the older @CODE_COVERAGE_RULES has been removed completely in support of including aminclude_static.am in Makefile.am. This all finally paved the way for libgdata’s meson port.

    Now, libgdata uses the namespace GData instead of Gdata and this raises quite a lot of issues when trying to create the enum header and source files using gnome.mkenums in meson. In autotools, we were using sed passes to edit out the generated enum files at compile time, and those files were being placed in their respective source directories. These files are further being included by other sources, and we can’t generate anything in the source directory because that’s the whole philosophy of meson, i.e. never clutter source directory for anything pertaining to build.

Security: FUD, Package Hardening, Excel and OpenPGP

Filed under
Security
  • Silexbot Bricks Nearly 4,000 IoT Devices [Ed: The problem is the password, not the system]

    Cashdollar explained: “Silexbot is using known default credentials for IoT devices to login and kill the system. The bot does this by writing random data from /dev/random to any mounted storage it finds. Examining binary samples collected from my honeypot, I see Silexbot calling fdisk -l which will list all disk partitions. Using that list, Silexbot then writes random data from /dev/random to any of the partitions it discovers.”

  • package hardening asymptote

    In the long-term view the measurements have a distinctly asymptotic appearance and the graphs are maybe only good for their historical curves now. But then I wonder, what’s next? What new compiler feature adoption could be measured? I think there are still a few good candidates…

  • New Exploit for Microsoft Excel Power Query

    Proof-of-concept, which allows remote code execution, is latest to exploit Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) and is another reminder why organizations must ensure Office settings are secure.

  • OpenPGP Certificate Flooding

    My public cryptographic identity has been spammed to the point where it is unusable in standard workflows. This blogpost talks about what happened, what I'm doing about it, and what it means for the broader ecosystem.

Games: Monster Prom, Robo Instructus, Valve Index, Dota Underlords

Filed under
Gaming
  • Monster Prom gains a new ending, mod tools and more in the latest update

    In the latest free update for the comedy dating sim Monster Prom, the "Startkicker Update", developer Beautiful Glitch has given it a new ending. See Also: Some previous thoughts on Monster Prom, it's actually really funny.

    This new ending is secret though and they're not wanting to spoil it but they did mention the "joys of entrepreneurship alongside Spooky High’s more money-savvy students" which might give you a clue. There's also a bunch of summer outfits included to match the season.

  • Programming puzzle game 'Robo Instructus' to release July 16th

    Fancy a bit of programming to solve some puzzles? Robo Instructus is exactly what you want then and it's releasing next month on July 16th with Linux support.

    The idea of the game is quite simple, with you manoeuvring a robot by issues instructions through the reasonably simple programming language. As you progress, you unlock the ability to use more functions, with multiple ways to solve each puzzle opening up depending on your skill and understanding.

  • With the Valve Index about to launch and be delivered, Valve held a little private launch party with speeches

    Valve's first in-house virtual reality hardware should be dropping at your door soon, if you were one of the lucky ones to order it quickly in the first batch. Additionally, Gabe Newell and others held speeches at a little launch party.

  • You might be hearing voices in the latest Dota Underlords update and it continues to capture my interest

    With the latest update to Dota Underlords now out, Valve continue moving quickly to make it a highly polished gameplay experience.

    Firstly, some characters actually got their voices back including: Doom, Drow, Enchantress, Lina, Luna, Mirana, Shadow Fiend, Phantom Assassin, Queen of Pain, Templar Assassin and Windranger. That actually makes it feel a little more polished and less lonely in a way, just one of those nice touches.

Kodi "Leia" 18.3 Release

Filed under
Software
Movies

Two months have passed since our last bugfix release and already we have a new one ready...

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Also: Kodi 18.3 Adds DTS-HD Audio Track Support To Its Music Player, Various Fixes

FreeDOS turns 25 years old: An origin story

Filed under
OSS

June 29 marks the 25th anniversary of FreeDOS. That's a major milestone for any open source software project, and I'm proud of the work that we've done on it over the past quarter century. I'm also proud of how we built FreeDOS because it is a great example of how the open source software model works.

For its time, MS-DOS was a powerful operating system. I'd used DOS for years, ever since my parents replaced our aging Apple II computer with a newer IBM machine. MS-DOS provided a flexible command line, which I quite liked and that came in handy to manipulate my files. Over the years, I learned how to write my own utilities in C to expand its command-line capabilities even further.

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More in Tux Machines

Best Torrent Clients for Linux

This article will cover various free and open source Torrent clients available for Linux. The torrents clients featured below have nearly identical feature sets. These features include support for magnet links, bandwidth control tools, tracker editing, encryption support, scheduled downloading, directory watching, webseed downloads, peer management, port forwarding and proxy management. Unique features of individual torrents clients are stated in their respective headings below. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Adding And Removing Swap Files Is Easy In Linux, Linux Action News, Open Source Security Poscast

  • Adding And Removing Swap Files Is Easy In Linux
  • Linux Action News 155

    We try out the new GNOME "Orbis" release and chat about Microsoft's new Linux kernel patches that make it clear Windows 10 is on the path to a hybrid Windows/Linux system. Plus, the major re-architecture work underway for Chrome OS with significant ramifications for Desktop Linux.

  •        
  • Open Source Security Poscast Episode 216 – Security didn’t find life on Venus

    Josh and Kurt talk about how we talk about what we do in the context of life on Venus. We didn’t really discover life on Venus, we discovered a gas that could be created by life on Venus. The world didn’t hear that though. We have a similar communication problem in security. How often are your words misunderstood?

Matthias Clasen: GtkColumnView

One thing that I left unfinished in my recent series on list views and models in GTK 4 is a detailed look at GtkColumnView. This will easily be the most complicated part of the series. We are entering into the heartland of GtkTreeView—anything aiming to replace most its features will be a complicated beast. Read more Also: Oculus Rift CV1 progress

AMD and Intel (x86) in Linux

  • Linux 5.10 Adding Support For AMD Zen 3 CPU Temperature Monitoring

    The next version of the Linux kernel will allow monitoring temperatures of the upcoming AMD Zen 3 processors. While CPU temperature monitoring support may seem mundane and not newsworthy, what makes this Zen 3 support genuinely interesting is that it's coming pre-launch... This is the first time in the AMD Zen era we are seeing CPU temperature reporting added to the Linux driver pre-launch. Not only is it coming ahead of the CPUs hitting retail channels but the support was added by AMD engineers.

  • FFmpeg Now Supports GPU Inference With Intel's OpenVINO

    Earlier this summer Intel engineers added an OpenVINO back-end to the FFmpeg multimedia framework. OpenVINO as a toolkit for optimized neural network performance on Intel hardware was added to FFmpeg for the same reasons there is TensorFlow and others also supported -- support for DNN-based video filters and other deep learning processing.

  • Intel SGX Enclave Support Sent Out For Linux A 38th Time

    For years now Intel Linux developers have been working on getting their Software Guard Extensions (SGX) support and new SGX Enclave driver upstreamed into the kernel. SGX has been around since Skylake but security concerns and other technical reasons have held up this "SGX Foundations" support from being mainlined. There has also been an apparent lack of enthusiasm by non-Intel upstream kernel developers in SGX. This past week saw the 38th revision to the patches in their quest to upstreaming this support for handling the Memory Encryption Engine (MEE) and relates SGX infrastructure. [...] The Intel SGX foundations v38 code can be found via the kernel mailing list. The Linux 5.10 merge window is opening up next month but remains to be seen if it will be queued for this next cycle or further dragged out into 2021.

  • Intel SGX foundations
    Intel(R) SGX is a set of CPU instructions that can be used by applications
    to set aside private regions of code and data. The code outside the enclave
    is disallowed to access the memory inside the enclave by the CPU access
    control.
    
    There is a new hardware unit in the processor called Memory Encryption
    Engine (MEE) starting from the Skylake microacrhitecture. BIOS can define
    one or many MEE regions that can hold enclave data by configuring them with
    PRMRR registers.
    
    The MEE automatically encrypts the data leaving the processor package to
    the MEE regions. The data is encrypted using a random key whose life-time
    is exactly one power cycle.
    
    The current implementation requires that the firmware sets
    IA32_SGXLEPUBKEYHASH* MSRs as writable so that ultimately the kernel can
    decide what enclaves it wants run. The implementation does not create
    any bottlenecks to support read-only MSRs later on.
    
    You can tell if your CPU supports SGX by looking into /proc/cpuinfo:
    
    	cat /proc/cpuinfo  | grep sgx