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June 2019

Raspbian Based On Debian 10 Offering Up Some Performance Improvements For Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Alongside this week's announcement of the Raspberry Pi 4, the Raspberry Pi Foundation also released a new Raspbian operating system release that is re-based from Debian 9 Stretch to the soon-to-be-released Debian 10 Buster. In benchmarking of these new and old Raspbian releases on a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B Plus, there are performance gains to find even if not jumping to the Raspberry Pi 4.

With the newly-released Raspbian 10, they have pulled in all of the latest Debian Buster package updates, which are quite meaningful compared to the rather stale state in the Debian 9 archive. Raspbian had already been offering a Linux 4.19 based kernel for the Raspberry Pi boards, so there isn't much of a kernel difference (just a slight 4.19.23 to 4.19.42 bump) but there are prominent upgrades like moving from the GCC 6.3 to GCC 8.3 compilers and various user-space application upgrades.

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Escuelas Linux Is Much More Than an Enlightened Linux Retread

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Escuelas Linux is a surprisingly good all-purpose distro despite its emphasis on education-specific software. However, its universal appeal is critically hampered by its Spanish- and English-only editions. You can always uninstall educational packages not to your liking or need.

Expect to take some time getting familiar with the Moksha desktop. That is my primary concern for younger students and others not familiar with any computer system.

I spent many years as an educator pushing computer technology in the classroom. Students' computing skills (with the exception of gaming) were often greatly lacking.

Moksha is not difficult to master. Yet I cringe at the thought of students and other users getting up to speed on the Moksha UI for hands-on productivity in the classroom and at home. Many of the specialty features built into Escuelas Linux will help teachers and system admins reduce the UI distractions.

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Arm-based HMI voice control kit targets industrial applications

Filed under
Linux

Renesas announced an industrial voice control “RZ/G Solution for HMI” kit that runs Linux and Sensory’s TrulyHandsfree voice stack on iWave’s Renesas RZ/G1E-based iW-RainboW-G22D module. There’s also a mic and a 4.3-inch LCD.

Renesas has partnered with Sensory, Shinko Shoji Co., and iWave to develop a voice control and speaker ID interface for industrial environments. The RZ/G Solution for HMI supports local voice processing without requiring a cloud connection. Renesas also recently previewed a power efficient CNN accelerator for edge AI (see farther below).

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Plans for IBM's Version of Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Upcoming features in Fedora 31 Workstation

    The Fedora Workstation edition is a fabulous operating system that includes everything a developer needs. But it’s also a perfect solution for anyone who wants to be productive online with their desktop or laptop computer. It features a sleek interface and an enormous catalog of ready-to-install software. Recently, Christian Schaller shared information about what’s coming in the Workstation for Fedora 31.

    Fedora 31 is currently scheduled for release in late October 2019. With it, as usual, will come an assortment of new and refreshed free and open source software. This includes the GNOME desktop which is planned to be updated to the latest 3.34.

    Under the hood of the desktop, many intrepid open source developers have been toiling away.

  • Fedora 31 to drop 32-bit kernel, retain support for 32-bit programs

    Proposed changes to a future version of the popular Linux distribution will decrease maintenance overhead while retaining support for 32-bit programs.

Qt Creator 4.10 Beta2 released

Filed under
Development
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.10 Beta2 !

Most notably we fixed a regression in the signing options for iOS devices, and that the “Build Android APK” step from existing Android projects was not restored.
As always you find more details in our change log.

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GNOME/Desktop: Xfway and GSoC with GNOME

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Xfway Aims To Provide A Wayland Compositor Inspired By Xfce's Xfwm4

    While it doesn't appear to be an official part of Xfce at least at this time, Xfway is a Wayland compositor inspired by Xfce's Xfwm4 window manager.

    Xfway was pointed out on the Wayland mailing list for this Xfce window manager inspired compositor.

    The code appears to have started out from the Weston code-base but adding support for Sway's WLROOTS among other changes inspired from Xfwm4.

  • GSoC with GNOME - Weeks 1 & 2

    The meson port for libgdata has been long due, and it was direly needed this time since Autotools 1.16.1 breaks an older API in such a way that at configure time, you get this issue. Moreover, even though you configure with --disable-dependency-tracking, at compile time you’re gifted with yet another error - Makefile:4517: *** missing separator. Stop.

    The issue stems from the fact that AX_CODE_COVERAGE recently changed the way it embeds code coverage rules in its outputted Makefile, i.e. the older @CODE_COVERAGE_RULES has been removed completely in support of including aminclude_static.am in Makefile.am. This all finally paved the way for libgdata’s meson port.

    Now, libgdata uses the namespace GData instead of Gdata and this raises quite a lot of issues when trying to create the enum header and source files using gnome.mkenums in meson. In autotools, we were using sed passes to edit out the generated enum files at compile time, and those files were being placed in their respective source directories. These files are further being included by other sources, and we can’t generate anything in the source directory because that’s the whole philosophy of meson, i.e. never clutter source directory for anything pertaining to build.

Security: FUD, Package Hardening, Excel and OpenPGP

Filed under
Security
  • Silexbot Bricks Nearly 4,000 IoT Devices [Ed: The problem is the password, not the system]

    Cashdollar explained: “Silexbot is using known default credentials for IoT devices to login and kill the system. The bot does this by writing random data from /dev/random to any mounted storage it finds. Examining binary samples collected from my honeypot, I see Silexbot calling fdisk -l which will list all disk partitions. Using that list, Silexbot then writes random data from /dev/random to any of the partitions it discovers.”

  • package hardening asymptote

    In the long-term view the measurements have a distinctly asymptotic appearance and the graphs are maybe only good for their historical curves now. But then I wonder, what’s next? What new compiler feature adoption could be measured? I think there are still a few good candidates…

  • New Exploit for Microsoft Excel Power Query

    Proof-of-concept, which allows remote code execution, is latest to exploit Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE) and is another reminder why organizations must ensure Office settings are secure.

  • OpenPGP Certificate Flooding

    My public cryptographic identity has been spammed to the point where it is unusable in standard workflows. This blogpost talks about what happened, what I'm doing about it, and what it means for the broader ecosystem.

Games: Monster Prom, Robo Instructus, Valve Index, Dota Underlords

Filed under
Gaming
  • Monster Prom gains a new ending, mod tools and more in the latest update

    In the latest free update for the comedy dating sim Monster Prom, the "Startkicker Update", developer Beautiful Glitch has given it a new ending. See Also: Some previous thoughts on Monster Prom, it's actually really funny.

    This new ending is secret though and they're not wanting to spoil it but they did mention the "joys of entrepreneurship alongside Spooky High’s more money-savvy students" which might give you a clue. There's also a bunch of summer outfits included to match the season.

  • Programming puzzle game 'Robo Instructus' to release July 16th

    Fancy a bit of programming to solve some puzzles? Robo Instructus is exactly what you want then and it's releasing next month on July 16th with Linux support.

    The idea of the game is quite simple, with you manoeuvring a robot by issues instructions through the reasonably simple programming language. As you progress, you unlock the ability to use more functions, with multiple ways to solve each puzzle opening up depending on your skill and understanding.

  • With the Valve Index about to launch and be delivered, Valve held a little private launch party with speeches

    Valve's first in-house virtual reality hardware should be dropping at your door soon, if you were one of the lucky ones to order it quickly in the first batch. Additionally, Gabe Newell and others held speeches at a little launch party.

  • You might be hearing voices in the latest Dota Underlords update and it continues to capture my interest

    With the latest update to Dota Underlords now out, Valve continue moving quickly to make it a highly polished gameplay experience.

    Firstly, some characters actually got their voices back including: Doom, Drow, Enchantress, Lina, Luna, Mirana, Shadow Fiend, Phantom Assassin, Queen of Pain, Templar Assassin and Windranger. That actually makes it feel a little more polished and less lonely in a way, just one of those nice touches.

Kodi "Leia" 18.3 Release

Filed under
Software
Movies

Two months have passed since our last bugfix release and already we have a new one ready...

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Also: Kodi 18.3 Adds DTS-HD Audio Track Support To Its Music Player, Various Fixes

FreeDOS turns 25 years old: An origin story

Filed under
OSS

June 29 marks the 25th anniversary of FreeDOS. That's a major milestone for any open source software project, and I'm proud of the work that we've done on it over the past quarter century. I'm also proud of how we built FreeDOS because it is a great example of how the open source software model works.

For its time, MS-DOS was a powerful operating system. I'd used DOS for years, ever since my parents replaced our aging Apple II computer with a newer IBM machine. MS-DOS provided a flexible command line, which I quite liked and that came in handy to manipulate my files. Over the years, I learned how to write my own utilities in C to expand its command-line capabilities even further.

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More in Tux Machines

Ferdi: A Free & Open-Source Alternative to Franz & Rambox

A single application to help you manage multiple services comes in handy when you do not want to do everything on your browser. While technically, you can, it may not be the most organized way of doing things. Hence, options like Rambox and Franz are pretty popular cross-platform solutions to sign in to several services and access all of them at a glance. Even though they both are available for Linux (and we’ve covered them separately), they offer limited features for free. In contrast, Ferdi is a fork of Franz offering many premium functionalities for free while aiming to provide a better experience. Read more

How to Install Python 3.10 in Ubuntu and Other Related Linux

Planning to get the Python 3.10 installed for your work? Here's how to install Python 3.10 in Ubuntu and related distributions. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Newest Linux Optimizations Can Achieve 10M IOPS Per-Core With IO_uring - Phoronix

    Just one week ago Linux block subsystem maintainer Jens Axboe was optimizing the kernel to get 8 million IOPS on a single CPU core. He progressed the week hitting around ~8.9M IOPS per-core and began to think he was hitting the hardware limits and running out of possible optimizations. However, this week he is kicking things off by managing to hit 10 million IOPS!

  • Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Quick overview #Shorts - Invidious

    A Quick overview of Ubuntu Kylin 21.10.

  • Reset Password On Any Linux Distro (No Root Needed) - Invidious

    Losing your access to your user account on Linux can be really frustrating but luckily resetting that lost password is actually incredibly easy but the process slightly changes depending on the bootloader you're using at least for the easy approach

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 706

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 706 for the week of October 17 – 23, 2021.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.43 Thank You

    Oleksandr Kyriukhin has released the 2021.10 version of the Rakudo Compiler, which includes all of the work of the new MoarVM dispatch mechanism. This is the culmination of more than 1.5 year work by many people, but mostly by Jonathan Worthington. A historic step forward that lays the groundwork on more efficient executing of Raku programs, and actually delivers on a number of improvements.

  • Team Profile by KDE's Cornelius Schumacher

    What makes a great team? One important factor is that you have a balanced set of skills and personalities in the team. A team which only consists of leaders won't get much work done. A team which only consists of workers will not work into the right direction. So how can you identify the right balance and combination of people? One answer is the Team Member Profile Test. It's a set of questions which team members answer. They are evaluated to give a result indicating which type of team member the person is and where it lies in the spectrum of possible types.

  • Some users on Reddit report that Windows 11 loses Internet connectivity when trying to connect to NordVPN.
  • Pat Gelsinger's Open-Source Bias, Intel's Pledge To Openness [Ed: Intel is openwashing again, but leaks from Intel show that Intel is a foe, not a a friend. It's also rather ironic that Intel puts an "open" letter in a proprietary site of Microsoft, which is viciously attacking Free software. Intel is a Microsoft booster.]

    Ahead of Intel's inaugural Intel Innovation event taking place virtually later this week, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger published an open letter to an open ecosystem. In this open ecosystem letter, Gelsinger talks up opennness and choice, adding, "This is why I fundamentally believe in an open source bias, which powers the software-defined infrastructure that transformed the modern data center and ushered in the data-centric era."

Raspberry Pi and Arduino Leftovers

  • Fast Indoor Robot Watches Ceiling Lights, Instead of the Road

    To pull this off, [Andy] uses a camera with a fisheye lens aimed up towards the ceiling, and the video is processed on a Raspberry Pi 3.

  • Tackle The Monkey: Raspberry Pi Gets Round Screen | Hackaday

    You could argue that the project to add a round screen to a Raspberry Pi from [YamS1] isn’t strictly necessary. After all, you could use a square display with a mask around it, giving up some screen real estate for aesthetics. However, you’d still have a square shape around the screen and there’s something eye-catching about a small round screen for a watch, an indicator, or — as in this project — a talking head. The inspiration for the project was a quote from a Google quote about teaching a monkey to recite Shakespeare. A 3D printed monkey with a video head would be hard to do well with a rectangular screen, you have to admit. Possible with a little artistry, we are sure, but the round head effect is hard to beat. Honestly, it looks more like an ape to us, but we aren’t primate experts and we think most people would get the idea.

  • Move! makes burning calories a bit more fun | Arduino Blog

    Gamifying exercise allows people to become more motivated and participate more often in physical activities while also being distracted by doing something fun at the same time. This inspired a team of students from the Handong Global University in Pohang, South Korea to come up with a system, dubbed “Move!,” that uses a microcontroller to detect various gestures and perform certain actions in mobile games accordingly. They started by collecting many different gesture samples from a Nano 33 BLE Sense, which is worn by a person on their wrist. This data was then used to train a TensorFlow Lite model that classifies the gesture and sends it via Bluetooth to the host phone running the app. Currently, the team’s mobile app contains three games that a player can choose from.