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June 2019

5 best Grub2 bootloader themes to use on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Lots of Linux users don’t know it, but the Grub2 bootloader can be customized. Just like every other aspect of the Linux platform, there are dozens of themes to look through, which means there’s something for everyone!

In this list, we’ll go over some of the best Grub2 bootloader themes you can get your hands on. Here are the 5 best Grub2 bootloader themes to use on Linux.

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4 best USB imaging apps to use on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There are a lot of excellent USB imaging apps for the Linux platform, and that’s great because the concept of choice is one of the fundamentals of Linux. However, some would argue that there are so many USB imaging tools available that beginner Linux users may not know what application to use. So, in this list, we’re going to go over some of the best USB imaging applications to use on Linux.

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today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos

Canonical Fixes Linux Kernel Regression in All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Last week, Canonical released Linux kernel updates for all supported Ubuntu releases to address several security vulnerabilities discovered by Jonathan Looney in Linux kernel's TCP retransmission queue implementation when handling some specific TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACKs).

Known as SACK Panic, these security vulnerabilities affect Ubuntu 19.04, Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS systems and could allow a remote attacker to crash the affected systems by causing a denial of service by constructing an ongoing sequence of requests.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Long-term Device Use

    It seems to me that Android phones have recently passed the stage where hardware advances are well ahead of software bloat. This is the point that desktop PCs passed about 15 years ago and laptops passed about 8 years ago. For just over 15 years I’ve been avoiding buying desktop PCs, the hardware that organisations I work for throw out is good enough that I don’t need to. For the last 8 years I’ve been avoiding buying new laptops, instead buying refurbished or second hand ones which are more than adequate for my needs. Now it seems that Android phones have reached the same stage of development.

    3 years ago I purchased my last phone, a Nexus 6P [1]. Then 18 months ago I got a Huawei Mate 9 as a warranty replacement [2] (I had swapped phones with my wife so the phone I was using which broke was less than a year old). The Nexus 6P had been working quite well for me until it stopped booting, but I was happy to have something a little newer and faster to replace it at no extra cost.

    Prior to the Nexus 6P I had a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 for 1 year 9 months which was a personal record for owning a phone and not wanting to replace it. I was quite happy with the Note 3 until the day I fell on top of it and cracked the screen (it would have been ok if I had just dropped it). While the Note 3 still has my personal record for continuous phone use, the Nexus 6P/Huawei Mate 9 have the record for going without paying for a new phone.

    A few days ago when browsing the Kogan web site I saw a refurbished Mate 10 Pro on sale for about $380. That’s not much money (I usually have spent $500+ on each phone) and while the Mate 9 is still going strong the Mate 10 is a little faster and has more RAM. The extra RAM is important to me as I have problems with Android killing apps when I don’t want it to. Also the IP67 protection will be a handy feature. So that phone should be delivered to me soon.

    Some phones are getting ridiculously expensive nowadays (who wants to walk around with a $1000+ Pixel?) but it seems that the slightly lower end models are more than adequate and the older versions are still good.

  • Full Circle Magazine #146
  • Diversity and inclusion in Debian: small actions and large impacts

    The Debian Project always has and always will welcome contributions from people who are willing to work on a constructive level with each other, without discrimination.

    The Diversity Statement and the Code of Conduct are genuinely important parts of our community, and over recent years some other things have been done to make it clear that they aren't just words.

    One of those things is the creation of the Debian Diversity Team: it was announced in April 2019, although it had already been working for several months before as a welcoming space for, and a way of increasing visibility of, underrepresented groups within the Debian project.

  • GNU Web Translation Coordination - News: Malayalam team re-established

    After more than 8 years of being orphaned, Malayalam team is active again. The new team leader, Aiswarya Kaitheri Kandoth, made a new translation of the Free Software Definition, so now we have 41 translations of that page!

    Currently, Malayalam the only active translation team of official languages of India. It is a Dravidian language spoken by about 40 million people worldwide, with the most speakers living in the Indian state of Kerala. Like many Indian languages, it uses a syllabic script derived from Brahmi.

  • Killing four myths about open source in financial service

    Although historically competitive, financial firms have only just begun to adopt “open innovation” strategies akin to what other industries have done over the last two or three decades.

    But what exactly are they? To clear up the confusion, this approach really means to leverage open source technology and standards to lower costs and reduce time-to-market for products and services. It also leads to the attraction and retention of top talent. As a recent example, Goldman Sachs recently stated its plans to release proprietary code on GitHub, a web-based hosting service for software developers using this technology.

    However, many financial services decision-makers have yet to fully grasp the power of open source collaboration for their businesses. Financial institutions on both the buy- and sell-side still suffer from ingrained misconceptions about legal issues or compete-at-all-costs mindsets across their technology stacks. This can stifle a move to a more collaborative strategy that can lead to tangible, improved long-term results.

    Open source is a collaborative software development model whereby code is made publicly available and maintained by a decentralised community of developers. While its origins are rooted in individual passion, this technology has risen to a mainstream commercial business model. For example, today the size of open source database market is $2.6 billion, or 7.6% of the entire market according to Gartner. And trends continue to point to an unstoppable growth with the global open source services market estimated to be at $32.95 billion by 2022, according to MarketsAndMarkets.

  • History Will Not Be Kind to Jony Ive

    But history will not be kind to Ive, to Apple, or to their design choices. While the company popularized the smartphone and minimalistic, sleek, gadget design, it also did things like create brand new screws designed to keep consumers from repairing their iPhones.

    Under Ive, Apple began gluing down batteries inside laptops and smartphones (rather than screwing them down) to shave off a fraction of a millimeter at the expense of repairability and sustainability.

  • Apple has a generational succession problem, and Jony Ive's departure is the tip of the iceberg

    Jony Ive's coming departure from Apple underscores the firm's attempts to shift from hardware to software. [...]

    [paywall]

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • How to explain service mesh in plain English

    In short, service mesh tools like Istio can reduce the operational burden of managing microservices-based applications, and in particular traffic between services, which could otherwise involve significant and often unsustainable manual work.

    As Red Hat CTO Chris Wright wrote earlier this year, “Alongside serverless, we see the service mesh concept taking off. A service mesh is essentially platform-level automation for creating the network connectivity required by microservices-based software architectures.”

    That’s a good, concise definition. We asked a variety of other IT leaders and practitioners to share their own clear-cut definitions to help boost your service mesh IQ, in part because it’s likely to come up in more discussions around containers, microservices, hybrid cloud, and other topics.

    Let’s start with some quick definitions:

  • How to write a sysadmin job description
  • Update on EPEL-8 Status

    EPEL packages are built inside of the Fedora Projects’ build infrastructure. This is done by downloading the packages from Red Hat’s public Content Delivery Network (CDN), and then having the Fedora artifact build system (koji) use the release as an external build channel. Koji looks at packages in a different way than other build commands like ‘mock’ do. Where mock is meant to just build packages, koji is designed about auditing the entire lifecycle of a package. In other words, if you want to know how a package in Fedora 12 was built and all its children interacted over time in the buildroots… you can do that with enough work and the koji databases. With mock you have a couple of log files which tell you what was pulled into a buildroot but how those were built would require you finding their log files, etc etc. A developer can also download those packages and look at them to see what was in them and how they were built.

    The strength of koji is that you can have a credible chain of builds to know where things came from. However this doesn’t work too well with building packages for EPEL where koji doesn’t know where the RHEL kernel came from. Koji uses mergerepo to look at the external packages provided, determines the src.rpm they would come from and determines what the latest version it would use from each. From this it creates a ‘buildroot’ which it will use to build packages from. This has worked pretty well for building packages from RHEL-5,6, and 7. The major downside has been where someone built a package with the same src.rpm name which koji then decides is the master no matter if a newer version shows up in RHEL.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-26

Wayland's Latest

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Waypipe Offers A Transparent Wayland Proxy For Running Programs Over The Network

    Waypipe is a transparent Wayland proxy and the latest of several different projects aiming to make it easy running Wayland clients over a network similar to X11's capabilities.

    Waypipe runs both on the client system and the "server" system and takes up the job of emulating shared files on each end of the connection, parsing and forwarding of protocol messages, etc. Waypipe supports shared memory and DMA-BUF.

  • It's Becoming Easier To Develop New Wayland Extensions For Mir

    The Mir 1.2 release was aiming to make it easier to develop Mir servers with custom Wayland extensions easier, but in dog feeding the work, Canonical's long-time Mir developer Alan Griffiths realized some shortcomings in the experience.

More in Tux Machines

Sparky 2019.11 Special Editions

There are new live/install media of Sparky 2019.11 “Po Tolo” Special Editions available to download: GameOver, Multimedia & Rescue. The live system is based on the testing branch of Debian “Bullseye”. GameOver Edition features a very large number of preinstalled games, useful tools and scripts. It’s targeted to gamers. Multimedia Edition features a large set of tools for creating and editing graphics, audio, video and HTML pages. The live system of Rescue Edition contains a large set of tools for scanning and fixing files, partitions and operating systems installed on hard drives. Read more

The Many Features & Improvements of the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Desktop Environment

With the KDE Plasma 5.17 release out the door last month, it's time to take a closer look at the new features and improvements coming to KDE Plasma 5.18, which will be released early next year as the next LTS (Long Term Support) version of open-source desktop environment designed to run on GNU/Linux distributions. Among the enhancements of the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS desktop environment, we can mention the ability to select and remove multiple Bluetooth devices simultaneously, support for KSysGuard to display stats for Nvidia graphics hardware, and a new "Home" button in System Settings that will take users back to the main page. Read more

Open-spec, dual-port router offers a choice of Allwinner H3 or H5

FriendlyElec’s Linux-driven, $20 “NanoPi R1S-H3” router uses a modified version of the Allwinner H3-based NanoPi R1, upgrading the second LAN port to GbE while removing a USB port. There’s also a similar, $23 “NanoPi R1S-H5” with a quad -A53 H5. Back in February, FriendlyElec launched the community-backed NanoPi R1 router SBC, which still sells for $29. Now it has followed up with two more affordable NanoPi R1S routers based on upgraded versions of the NanoPi R1 that that give you dual GbE ports instead of 10/100Mbps and 10/1000/1000Mbps. The mainboards are smaller than the R1 at 55.6 x 52mm, and the board and the case have been entirely redesigned. Read more

today's howtos