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June 2019

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Chinese hackers accused of 'mass-scale attack' on mobile operators

    The cyberespionage campaign, dubbed Operation Soft Cell, was first noticed a year ago. Since then, hackers been attacking various mobile operators to gain access to their networks and obtain call detail records (CDRs) of their targets from the database.

  • OSX/Linker: New Mac malware attempts zero-day Gatekeeper bypass

    The more technical explanation: Cavallarin noted that macOS treats apps loaded from a network share differently than apps downloaded from the Internet. By creating a symbolic link (or "symlink"—similar to an alias) to an app hosted on an attacker-controlled Network File System (NFS) server, and then creating a .zip archive containing that symlink and getting a victim to download it, the app would not be checked by Apple's rudimentary XProtect bad-download blocker.

  • Apple macOS Gatekeeper security flaw exploited out in the wild

    Cavallarin noted that he alerted Apple to the problem in February, and Cupertino's code wranglers were meant to have fixed it with macOS 10.14.5. But that doesn't appear to have happened, as security company Intego has discovered an example of it being used.

  • An 14-year-old's Internet-of-Things worm is bricking shitty devices by the thousands

    A hacker calling themself Light Leafon who claims to be a 14-year-old is responsible for a new IoT worm called Silex that targets any Unix-like system by attempting a login with default credentials; upon gaining access, the malware enumerates all mounted disks and writes to them from /dev/random until they are filled, then it deletes the devices' firewall rules and removes its network config and triggers a restart -- this effectively bricks the device, rendering it useless until someone performs the complex dance needed to download and reinstall the device's firmware.

  • scripting sudo's digest functions

    At my last job I wrote a couple perl scripts to build platform-specific digest-checking sudoers files for all programs in system directories. I've cleaned them up some and added Linux support. They're not on github because once I do that other folks might find them, and I'm not convinced this is a good thing. But I'd like some feedback, so I'm posting here.

  • VideoLAN Patches Critical Vulnerability in VLC Media Player

    Discovered by Symeon Paraschoudis from Pen Test Partners, the issue allows a remote attacker to create a specially crafted file to trigger a double free in zlib_decompress_extra() (demux/mkv/utils.cpp).

    This could then be leveraged to execute arbitrary code on the vulnerable system, the researcher says.

  • Double-Free RCE in VLC

    I spent three months working on VLC using Honggfuzz, tweaking it to suit the target. In the process, I found five vulnerabilities, one of which was a high-risk double-free issue and merited CVE-2019-12874.

    Here’s the VLC advisory https://www.videolan.org/security/sa1901.html.

    Here’s how I found it. I hope you find the how-to useful and it inspires you to get fuzzing.

  • PoC Released for Outlook Flaw that Microsoft Patched 6 Month After Discovery

    As we reported two days ago, Microsoft this week released an updated version of its Outlook app for Android that patches a severe remote code execution vulnerability (CVE-2019-1105) that impacted over 100 million users.

    However, at that time, very few details of the flaw were available in the advisory, which just revealed that the earlier versions of the email app contained a cross-site scripting (XSS) flaw that could allow attackers to run scripts in the context of the current user just by sending a specially crafted email to the victims.

    Now, Bryan Appleby from F5 Networks, one of the security researchers who reported this issue independently to Microsoft, released more details and proof-of-concept for the Outlook vulnerability that he reported to the tech giant almost six months ago.

  • How I [Cracked] the Microsoft Outlook Android App and Found CVE-2019-1105

    In a web browser, it’s possible to run JavaScript code by using a URL that starts javascript:. But in a web browser, JavaScript in an iframe on a separate domain shouldn’t have access to the data in the rest of the page. In Outlook on the Android, there is no such restriction. My iframe JavaScript had full access to cookies, tokens and even some emails. Not only that, I could send them back out to a remote attacker.

    This kind of vulnerability could be exploited by an attacker sending an email with JavaScript in it. The server escapes that JavaScript and does not see it because it’s within an iframe. When delivered, the mail client automatically undoes the escaping and the JavaScript runs on the client device. Bingo – a stored XSS. This code can do whatever the attacker desires, up to and including stealing information and/or sending data back out. An attacker can send you an email and just by you reading it, they could steal the contents of your inbox. Weaponized, this can turn into a very nasty piece of malware.

  • More than 400 737 Max pilots are suing Boeing over an 'unprecedented cover-up' of flaws in the plane's design

    More than 400 Boeing 737 Max pilots are suing the company over what they allege was an "unprecedented cover-up" of "known design flaws" in the plane, and over the financial losses they face as the plane remains grounded after two fatal crashes.

    A class-action lawsuit was filed against Boeing on Friday "for financial and other losses arising from the circumstances and grounding of the MAX fleet," according to the two law firms representing the pilots, based in Chicago and Australia.

  • US Public Might Not Be Told About Foreign Efforts to Alter Next Election

    With the 2020 presidential campaign getting under way, intelligence agencies, along with the Department of Homeland Security and FBI, have set about briefing the candidates and making them aware of the resources available should their campaign come under attack.

  • US election security: still a dumpster fire

    There's some progress on eliminating the voting-machine business altogether, with a free/open source system emerging from Los Angeles County's election authorities -- LA County is a national leader in election security and inclusiveness, with an 11-day voting window, available paper ballots for all, and a slate of accessibility features in its machines.

    But LA County is an exception, and between the poor-quality systems in place nationwide, intransigence from Senate Republicans on allocating funds for election security, and the diplomatic chaos that has failed to produce any international norms on election meddling, 2020 is looking like a potential shitshow to put 2016 to shame.

  • [Older] Securing Our Cyber Future

    This study seeks to provide a partial substitute for such a commission report. Building on the abovementioned research and investigations, our report begins by summarizing in Chapter One what the Kremlin did in 2016 and why. Chapters Two through Eight then offer concrete prescriptions for protecting the integrity and independence of U.S. elections, focusing in particular on strengthening resiliency before the 2020 presidential election. Our recommendations are practical, concrete, and achievable before 2020— but they demand action now.

  • A Likely Chinese [Attacker] Crew Targeted 10 Phone Carriers to Steal Metadata

    On Monday night, researchers at Boston-based cybersecurity firm Cybereason revealed the results of tracking a years-long cyberespionage campaign they've called Operation Soft Cell, which they say targeted the networks of at least 10 cellular providers around the world. And while researchers' visibility into that [attack] campaign is incomplete, they say it appears to be a prolific but highly targeted espionage campaign likely based in China. In one of the 10 breaches that affected a Cybereason customer, the researchers say they found that the [attackers] had gained deep access to the victim's network and stolen gigabytes of metadata related to 20 specific individuals' phone usage and location.

  • The Bug That Crashed New York’s Wireless Network

    The simple remedy involved some necessary upgrades.

    Yet somehow, New York City’s technology managers were caught completely off guard, and did nothing to prepare for the calendar reset of the centralized Global Positioning System.

    As a result, a wireless network used by city agencies crashed in April, crippling many services that relied on it, including some Police Department license plate readers and a system to remotely control traffic lights. It took 10 days to get the network running again.`

  • Sheryl Crow: Universal Studios fire destroyed all my master tapes

    "And secondly, I can't understand how you could make safeties [back-up copies] and have them in the same vault. I mean, what's the point?

    "And thirdly, I can't understand how it's been 11 years," she added. "I mean, I don't understand the cover-up."

    Crow, who had seven US top 10 albums between 1995 and 2008, is the first artist to confirm the loss of their recordings since the New York Times' investigation was published two weeks ago.

  • Windows 10 USB-C glitch is causing sluggish shutdowns

    While a minute might not seem like a long time, despite the protestations of some, when one is working on the move and needs to quickly pack up a laptop to so they can hop off a train, for example, 60 whole full-fat seconds can seem like a drag.

    It's also disconcerting when a computer takes a long time to shut down as well, given you don't know if it's suddenly going to throw up a blue screen of death.

Stable kernels 4.14.131, 4.9.184, and 4.4.184

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.14.131

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.14.131 kernel.

    All users of the 4.14 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 4.14.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.14.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.9.184
  • Linux 4.4.184

CentOS 8 To Arrive At The End Of June: All You Need To Know

Filed under
OS
Red Hat

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL 8) made its way into the market last month, which may have prompted a lot of people to expect the release of CentOS 8. according to recent reports, a major redesign is needed in the bundles; installer manufactures frameworks to make it ready to work with the more up to date working frameworks all the more proficiently. Here's all the info we've managed to scraped about the upcoming CentOS.

As indicated by the most recent reports, the fundamental form framework for the task has been finished, and at present, the group is focusing on the work of art. Additionally, the fabricate circles likewise need work to have the option to help the majority of the bundles of CentOS.

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Qt 3D Studio 2.4 Released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the Qt 3D Studio 2.4 release is now available via the online and offline installers. Here’s a quick summary of the new features and functions in 2.4. For detailed information about the Qt 3D Studio, visit the online documentation page or see the older blog posts.

Read more

Also: Qt 3D Studio 2.4 Released With Massive Performance Boost - By Switching Away From Qt 3D

FreeDOS's Linux Roots

Filed under
Linux

I discovered Linux in 1993 and instantly recognized it as a Big Deal. Linux had a command line that was much more powerful than MS-DOS, and you could view the source code to study the Linux commands, fix bugs and add new features. I installed Linux on my computer, in a dual-boot configuration with MS-DOS. Since Linux didn't have the applications I needed as a working college student (a word processor to write class papers or a spreadsheet program to do physics lab analysis), I booted into MS-DOS to do much of my classwork and into Linux to do other things. I was moving to Linux, but I still relied on MS-DOS.

In 1994, I read articles in technology magazines saying that Microsoft planned to do away with MS-DOS soon. The next version of Windows would not use DOS. MS-DOS was on the way out. I'd already tried Windows 3, and I wasn't impressed. Windows was not great. And, running Windows would mean replacing the DOS applications that I used every day. I wanted to keep using DOS. I decided that the only way to keep DOS was to write my own. On June 29, 1994, I announced my plans on the Usenet discussion group comp.os.msdos.apps, and things took off from there...

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Chrome OS 75 rolling out with Linux improvements, playing DRM video on external displays

    After rolling out to Android, Mac, Windows, and Linux, version 75 of Chrome OS is now available. Notable features include Linux improvements and more parental control options with Family Link.

    Linux on Chrome OS pick up support for Android devices over USB and VPN connections. Linux apps can access Android devices connected over USB, with this particularly useful for Android developers debugging and pushing APKs.

    Meanwhile, Linux applications can utilize existing Android or Chrome OS VPNs. All traffic from the Linux VM will automatically be routed through an established connection.

  • New laptop: ThinkPad X390

    The 13” 1920x1080 screen at ~160 dpi is a bit uncomfortable to use with my poor eyesight, so first I tried to use GNOME Tweaks to scale fonts to 120%. This worked okay-ish (a shame that Firefox ignores this and I had to tweak it separately) until I plugged in an external monitor (~80 dpi) where the large fonts were cartoonishly too large. Next, I enabled GNOME’s experimental fractional scaling support (I use a Ubuntu on Wayland session instead of the default one) and (after a reboot) set the zoom level on the internal screen to 125% (after resetting font scaling back to 100%, of course). Wayland apps look nice and crisp, X11 apps (Firefox) look fuzzy, but shrug at least I can read the text without squinting.

  • Concurrent Real-Time Introduces RedHawk Linux for NVIDIA's Jetson AGX Xavier

    In supporting the AGX Xavier, RedHawk Linux is well positioned for embedded applications in aerospace, defense, automotive, industrial and medical markets that require high-performance, low-power consumption and deterministic response. RedHawk provides a guaranteed response time of less than 50 microseconds on the AGX Xavier.

  • IGEL Drives the Rapid Growth of Linux OS-Based Devices at the Edge

    ...in 2018 Linux, for the first time, surpassed Windows shipments for thin clients, growing 6% per annum from 2015 to 2018 while Windows OS shrank 5% per annum during the same period.

  • LinuxQuestions.org Turns Nineteen

    I'm proud to announce that LQ turned 19 yesterday! I'd like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation and feedback. While there is always room for improvement, that LQ has remained a friendly and welcoming place for new Linux members despite its constantly growing member-base and geographic distribution is a testament to the community.

    To say that feedback has been absolutely critical to our success is an understatement. As has become tradition, I'd like to use this thread to collect as much feedback as possible about LQ. What are we doing well and where can we improve? Where are we failing? What can we do to ensure long time members remain engaged and willing to help? What can we do to ensure new members feel welcome? What should we be doing differently?

    As part of our 19 year anniversary, we'll be randomly selecting 19 posts from this thread and upgrading that member to "Contributing Member" status for one year. Stay tuned, and thanks again for being a member. Together, I think we can make LQ even better.

  • Flea Madness sound like a ridiculously fun multiplayer game where you eat your enemies

    Flea Madness, currently in development by Priple is a fast-paced multiplayer action game that looks good and the idea sounds pretty amusing too.

    Each player assumes the role of an alien flea, a biological weapon with a singular purpose—eat everything. As you hunt and eat others, you evolve into a more dangerous creature too. Spread across the maps, you will find insects to eat, which will also give you various abilities although not all of them good for you. Some might speed you up, turn you invisible or reverse your controls.

  • Steam’s Summer Sale 2019 Is Live With A New Way To Earn Free Games

    Steam’s annual event, which PC gamers eagerly await each year, has finally started. The Steam Summer Sale 2019 is now live and will run through July 9, offering gamers a seemingly endless list of games to choose from.

    “Start your engines, everybody… the Steam Summer Sale has begun! For the next 14 days, enjoy great savings on a huge selection of games and join in the Steam Grand Prix 2019 event until July 7th 10AM PDT,” Steam says in a blog post.

    Thousands of games across various genres are now available on discount, so if you don’t have a Steam wishlist, it could prove difficult to choose the games you want. However, to help you make a choice, we have listed some of the best deals from the Steam Summer Sale 2019.

  • GCC 10 Lands Support For Intel Tiger Lake's AVX-512 VP2INTERSECT

    Similar to the recent LLVM compiler work, the in-development GCC 10 compiler also now has support for the AVX-512 VP2INTERSECT instructions being introduced on Intel Tiger Lake CPUs.

  • DisplayPort 2.0 Published For 3x Increase In Data Bandwidth Performance

    VESA announced their first major update to the DisplayPort interface in three years.

    DisplayPort 2.0 provides for a three fold increase in data bandwidth performance compared to DP 1.4a, support beyond 8K resolutions, higher refresh rates and HDR at higher resolutions, and other enhancements. DisplayPort 2.0 will work both on DisplayPort connectors and USB Type-C with backwards compatibility.

  • SiFive CEO Says RISC-V Servers are 'Five Years Away'

    Last year he thought smartphones and servers were five and 10 years away, respectively, but he's had to "pull in his targets."

Software: Nvidia, MuseScore, Cockpit, Oracle Java and KDE/Krita

Filed under
Software
  • 2 Tools For Monitoring Nvidia GPUs On Linux (GUI And Command Line)

    This article presents 2 tools for monitoring Nvidia graphics cards on Linux: one that comes with a terminal user interface (TUI), so it runs in a console, and another one that uses a graphical user interface.

  • MuseScore 3.2 Released with Dozens of Bug Fixes

    Free scorewriter MuseScore 3.2 was released a day ago with dozens of bug-fixes as well as some improvements to user interface.

  • Cockpit 197

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 197.

  • New Oracle Java 11 Installer For Ubuntu Or Linux Mint (Using Local Oracle Java .tar.gz)

    As many of you already know, Oracle Java requires logging in to an Oracle account to download most versions (all except Oracle Java 12). A while back I created Oracle Java 11 and 12 installer packages (based on the package by Web Upd8), and a PPA for Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

    Since Oracle Java 11 can't be directly downloaded from Oracle any more, the installer no longer works, so I created a new installer that requires the user to create an Oracle account, download the Oracle Java 11 .tar.gz archive (the same version as the installer), and place the archive in /var/cache/oracle-jdk11-installer-local/. After this, you can install the oracle-java11-installer-local package, and it will set up Oracle Java 11 for you.

    Everything else works as before. You can install the oracle-java11-set-default-local package to set Oracle Java 11 as default for example (not only set it as default using a .jinfo file and update-alternatives, but also export the JAVA_HOME environment variable, etc.).

  • My first month on GSoC

    This first month of GSoC was a great learning experience for me, when speaking to my colleagues of how Summer of Code is being important to my professional life, I always respond that I’m finally learning to code and the basic of C++.

    Yes, maybe this is strange, I’m a second year undergraduate Computer Science student, have two year experience with C++. I should have learn to code by now right? Well, at least on my Campus you don’t learn to code applications or how to build stable, clean code. You learn to solve problems, and that’s something I got pretty good at, but when it came to code, well, I’m learning that now and I’m liking it a lot.

  • Snapshot Docker

    The idea of snapshots is to make copies of the current document and allow users to return to them at a later time. This is a part of my whole Google Summer of Code project, which aims to bring Krita a better undo/redo system. When fully implemented, it will fully replace the current mechanism that stores actions with one that stores different states. That is to say, Krita will create a snapshot of the document for every undoable step.

    [...]

    Another interesting thing is the palettes. Krita 4.2.0 allows documents to store their own, local palettes. The palette list is but a QList<KoColorSet *>, meaning that only creating a new QList of the same pointers will not work. This is because, the palettes are controlled by canvas resource manager, which takes the responsibility to delete them. Therefore, when taking snapshots, we had better take deep copies of the KoColorSets. And then another problem comes: the snapshots own their KoColorSets because they are not controlled by the resource manager in any way; but the KisDocument in the view does not. So we have to set up another flag, ownsPaletteList, to tell the document whether it should delete the palettes in the destructor.

    And now the work has shifted to the refactoring of kritaflake, the library that mainly handles vector layers and shapes. I converted the whole KoShape hierarchy to implicit sharing where possible, but some tests are broken. I am now on Windows, where unit tests do not run. I will continue the development of flake as soon as I get access to my Linux laptop.

Fedora Workstation 31, AAC Support

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Workstation 31 to come with Wayland support, improved core features of PipeWire, and more

    On Monday, Christian F.K. Schaller, Senior Manager for Desktop at Red Hat, shared a blog post that outlined the various improvements and features coming in Fedora Workstation 31. These include Wayland improvements, more PipeWire functionality, continued improvements around Flatpak, Fleet Commander, and more.

  • Fedora's AAC Support Finally Seeing Audio Quality Improvements

    Fedora's version of the FDK-AAC library that they began shipping in 2017 to finally provide AAC audio support strips out what was patented encumbered functionality. But that gutting of the code did cause some problems like audio playback glitches that are now being addressed.

    Fortunately, better AAC support is on the way to Fedora. There is this F30 update pending to provide an updated AAC implementation with quality enhancements.

More in Tux Machines

Inside KDE: leadership and long-term planning

Based on my post about KDE’s anarchic organization and the micro-not-macro nature of my This Week in KDE series, you would be forgiven for having the impression that KDE is directionless and has no leadership or long-term planning capabilities. In fact the opposite is true, and I’d like to talk a bit about that today, since this information may not be obvious to users and the wider community. Now, since KDE is so vast, I can only provide my personal perspective based on the projects I’m most heavily involved in: the VDG, Plasma, and a few apps. [...] KDE doesn’t lack for strategic long-term goals and direction, so I think that part can be pretty solidly marked as a success. As for tactical leadership and direction within and between individual projects, I also think things are pretty rosy overall. KDE’s maintainer-led projects generally have excellent maintainers. The variety of KDE apps using this model model is a testament to how successful it can be with a high-quality maintainer–especially our professional-class apps like Krita. And in my opinion, KDE’s council of elders projects also have very good leadership today Read more

today's howtos

  • Installing PHP 8 on Debian 10

    PHP is a general-purpose open-source scripting language that can be embedded in HTML. It stands for HypertextProcessor and is widely used in web development. A scripting language is used to write ready-made programs that are later used to automate tasks. PHP scripts are often used on Linux, Unix, Windows, Mac OS, and other operating systems. With PHP, you have the freedom to choose an operating system and the underlying web server, according to your needs. In this article, we will explain how to install PHP 8, PHP 7.4, and PHP 5.6 on Debian. After you have installed the multiple PHP versions, we will also explain how to disable one version and choose a default version on the system.

  • Install a minimal KDE on Debian 10 "buster" - PragmaticLinux

    If you select the KDE desktop environment, while installing Debian, the installer installs several extra desktop applications. Kmail, Knotes, Korganizer, Kaddressbook, to name just a few. Not all KDE users are interested in these extra desktop applications. However, when attempting to remove them, Debian removes the entire KDE. Luckily, a method exists to install just a minimal version of KDE in Debian. Grab yourself a drink and read on to find out how you can install a minimal KDE on Debian.

  • How to delete container with lxc (LXD) command on Linux - nixCraft

    Explains how to delete and remove LXD based container or instance with the lxc command on Linux operating systems using the CLI.

  • Building Resilient Microservices with Istio and Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh (Course DO328)
  • Understanding Linux File Permissions and Ownership – Linux Hint

    Linux operating system, which is a clone of UNIX, is developed to handle multiple users with multi-tasking features. This means than more than one user can work in this operating at the same time when the computer is attached to a network or Internet. The remote users can connect with the computer that contains the Linux operating system through SSH and work on the system. It is very important to maintain security when multiple users work in the same operating system at the same time. Many built-in security features exist in the Linux operating system that can be used when local or remote access is granted from different users. The Linux users have to understand the concept of file permissions and the ownership of the file to provide security at the file system level. How the Linux users can view and modify the permissions, and the ownership of the file and folders is shown in this article.

Python Programming

  • Python uppercase string – Linux Hint

    The upper() function translates all the lowercase characters in a string into uppercase and returns the string. The upper() function is an integral function in Python. In certain cases, the upper() function is very useful. For example, if we are developing a university management system and want to convert the name of all the students into uppercase letters, in this case, we will definitely use the upper() function. This article explains the use of the upper() function with the help of simple examples.

  • Basics of Parsing Command Line Arguments in Python | FOSS Linux

    Command-line applications are one of the oldest and most used types of apps. If you are an experienced Linux user, you may have hardly used GUI tools instead of command-line tools to do the same task. For example, Anaconda, the package manager for python, has command-line tools named conda and GUI tool named anaconda navigator.

  • How To Take A Screenshot Using Python & Selenium? | Codementor

    The goto software framework for any web developer looking for an open-source, free test automation tool is Selenium. It is used with various programming languages, including Java, Python, PHP, Perl, and C#. Selenium can also be used as a web-scraping tool or to create a human-replica bot to automate social-media or even test PDF files ! Geeks at Google & Thoughtworks are highly credited for its development and maintenance. In this Python Selenium screenshot tutorial, we are going to explore different ways of taking screenshots using Selenium’s Python bindings. Before we hop-on to capturing Python Selenium screenshots, let’s first acquaint ourselves with Selenium Python bindings.

  • The More, the Better — Why Become a Multi-Language Programmer | Codementor

    Are you just taking your first step into web development, and you want to learn programming? Discover the benefits of learning more than one programming language.

  • Datacamp Review 2020 - PythonForBeginners.com

    DataCamp is the best source of reference material for data science. It is the first online learning platform dedicated to providing data science training to professionals seeking the knowledge and understanding of the topic. Established in 2014, DataCamp is a MOOC-providing platform. MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Courses meaning that the company specializes in providing online courses to students all over the world. In this Datacamp review, I am going to tell how easy it is to use DataCamp then touch on the quality of courses offered. I’ll follow with telling you about some of the features you will find with DataCamp and how you can start exploring DataCamp for free before finishing up the review with the pricing and whether or not it is worth paying for DataCamp.

  • How To: Simple HTTP Server with Python

    When building new infrastructure elements and deploying servers, quite often you need to test firewall rules before the rest of application stack is deployed. The basic tool of my choice here is curl which is great to testing TCP connections. But it has an important dependency: you actually need to have something listening on the other end of the connection you’re testing. If there’s no software running and servicing the port you specify, you will receive an error. Traditionally there have been small programs or scripts you’d write - first (many years ago now) in C, later in Perl. They would imply that you have to bring your test code or compiled binary to the server you need to test. Today I’d like to share a super easy way to start a basic HTTP server with Python - it’s literally just one line that will work in most cases since Python is now ubiqutous enough to be installed by default in most Linux distributions.

Magazines and Shows: Linux Format, Firewalls, Destination Linux and mintCast

  • Linux IS fun! | Linux Format

    Some people have gained the impression that Linux might not be fun. How did that happen? So this issue we’re putting the fun back into Lin(f)u(n)x! We’re not sure that’s going to catch on… This issue we’re going to look at Plex. While no longer open source, it’s always treated Linux as a first-class citizen and delivers a super-slick media streaming experience across networks, devices and all media. You can use it for free and if you get on with it there are membership levels that unlock extra features and app access. It’s certainly a system that works for Plex.

  • Enabling A Firewall Is Easy In Linux - YouTube

    I am going to show you how to install and enable the Uncomplicated Firewall (ufw) and how to add and delete rules for it. Ufw is a very easy-to-use command line utility, and for those that want a graphical tool, gufw is available as well.

  • Destination Linux 196: Going Sub-Atomic With Quantum Computing - Destination Linux

    This week We’re going to take a look at what’s new for KDE’s latest Plasma 5.20 release! We’re going visit the Quantum Realm to discuss Quantum Computing and an article Red Hat released about the subject including what sysadmins will need to do to manage in this new realm without an Ant Man suit. In our gaming section, we’re going to be howling at the moon because this week we’ll be checking out Werewolf: The Apocalypse — Heart of the Forest. Later in the show, we’ll give you our popular tips/tricks and software picks. Plus so much more, on this week’s episode of Destination Linux.

  • mintCast 346 – It’s Not You, It’s Me – mintCast

    First up, in our Wanderings, Leo makes web apps, Moss sends a Telegram, Joe gets an upgrade, Josh fights with a mic, and Bo gets a gnome.