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May 2019

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux OS to Reach End of Life on June 30th, 2019

Filed under
OS
SUSE

Launched on July 26, 2017, OpenSuSE Leap 42.3 was based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 operating system and it was powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 was initially supposed to be supported until January 2019, but the openSUSE Project decided to give users six more months to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 operating system series.

Now that openSUSE Leap 15.1 is here as the latest and greatest openSUSE Leap release, it's time for openSUSE Leap 42.3 users to upgrade their installations, and they only have one month to do that, until June 30th, 2019.

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Hybrid RK3399 COM/SBC hacker board can plug into feature-rich carrier

Filed under
Android
Linux

FriendlyElec’s $75, RK3399-based “SOM-RK3399” COM/SBC hybrid can stand alone or expand with a $120 “SOM-RK3399 Dev Kit” with -20 to 70℃ support and M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion.

Last year, FriendlyElec released two open-spec SBCs that ran Linux and Android on the hexa-core Rockchip RK3399: the $65 and up NanoPi M4 and the smaller, $50 NanoPi Neo4. Now, FriendlyElec has launched an RK3399-based SOM-RK3399 compute module for $75 that is available with a sandwich-style, $120 SOM-RK3399 Dev Kit. The module also qualifies as an SBC by dint of its dual USB Type-C ports.

The SOM-RK3399, which we saw on CNXSoft, is FriendlyElec’s second compute module after the Samsung S5P6818-based Smart6818 module found on its Octa-Core 64-bit AiO Android System touch-panel computer. Like Shenzhen Wesion’s RK3399-based Khadas Edge, it can operate standalone or be deployed as part of a sandwich-style SBC via an edge connector. The SOM-RK3399 is more COM-like than the Khadas Edge, which offers more real-world ports.

Read more

Dell releases more high-end Ubuntu Linux laptops

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical and Ubuntu Linux founder Mark Shuttleworth recently said, "We have seen companies signing up for Linux desktop support, because they want to have fleets of Ubuntu desktop for their artificial intelligence engineers."

Dell has noticed, too.

Dell Senior Architect Barton George announced: "If mobile power is what you're looking for, you've come to the right place. And if AI is your need, the Precision 7540 and 7740 might just be what you've been looking for."

Linux PCs may never catch up with Windows on consumer laptops, but they are starting to make a bigger impression on developer laptops. Even Microsoft is now building Linux into Windows with Windows Subsystem for Linux. Why? Because today's developers are working on projects such as Kubernetes, AI, cloud-native computing, and machine learning, which live and die on Linux.

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DragonFlyBSD's Kernel Optimizations Are Paying Off - 3 BSDs & 5 Linux OS Benchmarks On Threadripper

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has been working on a big VM rework in the name of performance and other kernel improvements recently. Here is a look at how those DragonFlyBSD 5.5-DEVELOPMENT improvements are paying off compared to DragonFlyBSD 5.4 as well as FreeBSD 12 and five Linux distribution releases. With Dillon using an AMD Ryzen Threadripper system, we used that too for this round of BSD vs. Linux performance benchmarks.

The work by Dillon on the VM overhaul and other changes (including more HAMMER2 file-system work) will ultimately culminate with the DragonFlyBSD 5.6 release (well, unless he opts for DragonFlyBSD 6.0 or so). These are benchmarks of the latest DragonFlyBSD 5.5-DEVELOPMENT daily ISO as of this week benchmarked across DragonFlyBSD 5.4.3 stable, FreeBSD 12.0, Ubuntu 19.04, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0, Debian 9.9, Debian Buster, and CentOS 7 1810 as a wide variety of reference points both from newer and older Linux distributions. (As for no Clear Linux reference point for a speedy reference point, it currently has a regression with AMD + Samsung NVMe SSD support on some hardware, including this box, prohibiting the drive from coming up due to a presumed power management issue that is still being resolved.)

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Stable kernels 5.1.6, 5.0.20, 4.19.47, 4.14.123 , and 4.9.180

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1.6

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.6 kernel.

    All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.0.20
  • Linux 4.19.47
  • Linux 4.14.123
  • Linux 4.9.180

antiX MX Linux 18.3 Released with Latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.9 "Stretch" Updates

Filed under
Linux
Debian

MX Linux 18.3 is now available and ships with Linux kernel 4.19.37-2 and it's fully synced with the software repositories of the latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.9 "Stretch" operating system release, which means that it is fully patched against the recently disclosed Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) security vulnerabilities found in Intel microprocessors.

This release also includes an updated installer (mx-installer) that now lets users input system configuration selections during installation while the installer copies the system files to speed up the installation process. The UEFI boot installation was improved as well in MX Linux 18.3, which should now be compatible with more UEFI systems.

Read more

Deepin Linux: Security Threat or Safe to Use?

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Deepin Linux continues to show promise as a productive computing platform. This latest edition has fewer of the annoyances that plagued earlier releases.

The menus and internal dialogue boxes still have some Chinese characters. The potential user base is limited by a short list of available languages.

The ISO file on the standard download page is not a live session. It provides only a loadable interface to handle installation.

To get the live session ISO file, use the download page link in the previous paragraph. Then scroll to the bottom of the download options to the "Live Session Download" label and click the "Live Official Release" button.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Foliate is an Epic eBook Reader App for Linux Desktops

    Foliate is a new ebook reader app for Linux desktops whose streamlined, stylish GUI recently caught my eye.

    While I, personally, still find it easier to read ebooks on a dedicated e-reader device with an e-ink screen (like an Amazon Kindle) I do appreciate that there are features desktop ebook reader apps can offer that a dedicated e-reading device can not.

    Many of which you’ll find on offer in the ‘pages’ of Foliate, which pitches itself as a “simple and modern ebook viewer” for Linux desktops.

    Keen to learn more?

    Let’s dive in.

  • LibreOffice monthly recap: May 2019

    We started with a new Month of LibreOffice. These are twice-yearly campaigns where we encourage people to join our community and help to improve the software. Everyone who contributes can claim a cool sticker pack at the end – and this year, we have some exclusive glass mugs for a randomly selected bunch of winners too!

  • Lack of leadership in open source results in source-available licenses

    Don’t get me wrong — there will still be open source, lots and lots of it. But authors of open-source infrastructure software will put their interesting features in their “enterprise” versions if we as an industry cannot solve the Amazon problem.

    Unfortunately, the dark cloud on the horizon I wrote about back in November has drifted closer. Amazon has exhibited three particularly offensive and aggressive behaviors toward open source: [...]

  • Tantek Çelik: The @W3C Needs You: Please Vote For Change In The @W3CAB Election

    Please Vote in the 2019 W3C Advisory Board Election (W3C Member-only link, only Advisory Committee members can vote).

    My fellow Advisory Board (AB) candidates and additional members of the W3C Community have shared their thoughts on the AB election, some on their blogs, and some on W3C Member only list(s).

    It is very important that you explicitly rank candidates according to what is most important to you due to the way the current W3C STV mechanism is interpreted and implemented by the W3C Team. Past STV elections have shown that a Ranked 1 vote is crucial to candidates, Ranked 2 may have some impact, and the likelihood of effect drops off precipitously from there (though you should still rank at least a few more, ideally all candidates, just in case).

  • Huawei can now add the IEEE to the growing list of companies banning it

    "IEEE complies with US government regulations which restrict the ability of the listed Huawei companies and their employees to participate in certain activities that are not generally open to the public. This includes certain aspects of the publication peer review and editorial process," the organisation said.

  • Guest Post: Export Restrictions, Membership Organizations and Huawei

    New U.S. sanctions against Huawei in the escalating U.S. – China trade war have thrown another wrench into the gears of global commerce. But how do these sanctions affect standards organizations and open source development? The high level answer is that the impact will be significant for most standards organizations, and negligible for most open source projects. The major differentiator will be the degree of transparency of the organization in question.

    The details, and the answer for any given organization, however are much more complicated, and the political landscape remains dynamic and subject to change.

  • Microsoft’s Universal Windows Platform app dream is dead and buried

    Microsoft had a dream with Windows 8 that involved universal Windows apps that would span across phones, tablets, PCs, and even Xbox consoles. The plan was that app developers could write a single app for all of these devices, and it would magically span across them all. This dream really started to fall apart after Windows Phone failed, but it’s well and truly over now.

    Microsoft has spent years pushing developers to create special apps for the company’s Universal Windows Platform (UWP), and today, it’s putting the final nail in the UWP coffin. Microsoft is finally allowing game developers to bring full native Win32 games to the Microsoft Store, meaning the many games that developers publish on popular stores like Steam don’t have to be rebuilt for UWP.

    “We recognize that Win32 is the app format that game developers love to use and gamers love to play, so we are excited to share that we will be enabling full support for native Win32 games to the Microsoft Store on Windows,” explains Microsoft’s gaming chief Phil Spencer. “This will unlock more options for developers and gamers alike, allowing for the customization and control they’ve come to expect from the open Windows gaming ecosystem.”

  • Microsoft Wanted To Create History With UWP; Now It’s Turning Back
  • Cepsa Powers New Digital Customer Experiences with Red Hat-based Container Platform
  • Alibaba Cloud Launches 10+ New Products And Features @ APAC Summit

    Alibaba Cloud, the data intelligence backbone of Alibaba Group, is focused on providing the Asia Pacific region with a cloud service to drive a highly integrated technology ecosystem. In line with its goal, Alibaba Cloud today launched more than 10 new products and features at the Alibaba Cloud APAC Summit. The company also announced a new accelerator program connecting technology partners with the Alibaba ecosystem.

  • Contributing to Open Source with Docker, Inc

    The rumors have finally been confirmed. Docker, Inc. is opening their new R&D center in Sofia. At an event last night, they stated their intentions to do a fair amount of product development in Sofia as well as contribute to the local society/community too (if I got this correctly). This is very good news for the local eco-system so congrats for that from my side!

    This blog post outlines my impressions from the event and a few related more general thoughts.

Debian: Outreachy interns and Free software activities in OSI Etc.

Filed under
Debian

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Researchers Build App That Kills To Highlight Insulin Pump Exploit

    By now the half-baked security in most internet of things (IOT) devices has become a bit of a running joke, leading to amusing Twitter accounts like Internet of Shit that highlight the sordid depth of this particular apathy rabbit hole. And while refrigerators leaking your gmail credentials and tea kettles that expose your home networks are entertaining in their own way, it's easy to lose sight of the fact that the same half-assed security in the IOT space also exists on most home routers, your car, your pacemaker, and countless other essential devices and services your life may depend on. Case in point: just about two years ago, security researchers discovered some major vulnerabilities Medtronic's popular MiniMed and MiniMed Paradigm insulin pumps. At a talk last year, they highlighted how a hacker could trigger the pumps to either withhold insulin doses, or deliver a lethal dose of insulin remotely. But while Medtronic and the FDA warned customers about the vulnerability and issued a recall over time, security researchers Billy Rios and Jonathan Butts found that initially, nobody was doing much to actually fix or replace the existing devices. [...] And of course that's not just a problem in the medical sector, but most internet-connected tech sectors. As security researcher Bruce Schneier often points out, it's part of a cycle of dysfunction where the consumer and the manufacturer of a flawed product have already moved on to the next big purchase, often leaving compromised products, and users, in a lurch. And more often than not, when researchers are forced to get creative to highlight the importance of a particular flaw, the companies in question enjoy shooting the messenger.

  • Desktop Operating Systems: Which is the safest? [Ed: This shallow article does not discuss NSA back doors and blames on "Linux" devices with open ports and laughable passwords -- based on narrative often pushed by corporate media to give illusion of parity. Also pushes the lie of Linux having minuscule usage.]
  • How Open Source Data Can Protect Consumer Credit Card Information
  • Open Source Hacking Tool Grows Up

    An open source white-hat hacking tool that nation-state hacking teams out of China, Iran, and Russia have at times employed to avoid detection....

Games: Dota Underlords and Stadia

  • Dota Underlords has another update out, this one changes the game quite a lot

    Valve continue to tweak Dota Underlords in the hopes of keeping players happy, this mid-Season gameplay update flips quite a few things on their head. I like their sense of humour, with a note about them removing "code that caused crashes and kept code that doesn't cause crashes". There's a few smaller changes like the addition of Loot Round tips to the Season Info tab, the ability to change equipped items from the Battle Pass and some buffs to the amount XP awarded for your placement in matches and for doing the quests. Meaning you will level up the Battle Pass faster.

  • Interested in Google's Stadia game streaming service? We have a few more details now

    With Google's game streaming service Stadia inching closer, we have some more information to share about it. Part of this, is thanks to a recent AMA (Ask Me Anything) they did on Reddit. I've gone over what questions they answered, to give you a little overview. Firstly, a few points about the Stadia Pro subscription: The Pro subscription is not meant to be like a "Netflix for Games", something people seem to think Stadia will end up as. Google said to think of it more like Xbox Live Gold or Playstation Plus. They're aiming to give Pro subscribers one free game a month "give or take". If you cancel Stadia Pro, you will lose access to free games claimed. However, you will get the previously claimed games back when you re-subscribe but not any you missed while not subscribed. As for Stadia Base, as expected there will be no free games included. As already confirmed, both will let you buy games as normal.

LabPlot has got some beautifying and lots of datasets

Hello everyone! The second part of this year's GSoC is almost over, so I was due to let you know the progress made in the last 3 weeks. I can assure you we haven't lazed since then. I think I managed to make quite good progress, so everything is going as planned, or I could say that even better. If you haven't read about this year's project or you just want to go through what has already been accomplished you can check out my previous post. So let's just go through the new things step by step. I'll try to explain the respective feature, and also give examples using videos or screenshots. The first step was to improve the welcome screen and make it easily usable, dynamic, clean and intuitive for users. This step was very important since the welcome screen is what the users will first get in contact with when they start using LabPlot. Read more

Graphics: Weston 7.0 Reaches Alpha and RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver Adds Navi Wave32 Support

  • weston 6.0.91
    This is the alpha release for weston 7.0.  A lot of new features and
    fixes are shipped in this release, including:
    
    - New internal debug scopes and logging framework
    - Improved documentation
    - HDCP support
    - A new PipeWire plugin
    
    Thanks to all contributors!
    
    We've moved to Meson as our only build system, autotools support has
    been removed.  Package maintainers: please report any issues you have
    with Meson before the stable release.
    
    Full commit history below.
    
  • Weston 7.0 Reaches Alpha With PipeWire, HDCP, EGL Partial Updates & Mores

    Wayland release manager Simon Ser announced the alpha release of the Weston 7.0 reference compositor on Friday that also marks the feature freeze for this Wayland compositor update. Some of the major changes to Weston 7.0 include HDCP content protection support, better documentation, new debugging and logging framework support, and the just-added PipeWire plug-in for remote streaming. There are also less prominent additions like EGL partial update support, various DRM compositor back-end restructuring, build system updates, and a variety of libweston updates.

  • RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver Adds Navi Wave32 Support

    One of the new features to the RDNA architecture with Navi is support for single cycle issue Wave32 execution on SIMD32. Up to now the RadeonSI code was using just Wave64 but now there is support in this AMD open-source Linux OpenGL driver for Wave32. Well known AMD open-source developer Marek Olšák landed this Wave32 support on Friday for the RadeonSI driver. The Wave32 support landed over several commits to Mesa 19.2-devel and is enabled for vertex, geometry, and tessellation shaders. Wave32 isn't enabled for pixel shaders but rather Wave64. Additionally, Wave32 isn't yet enabled for compute shaders due to Piglit OpenGL test case failures.