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December 2018

5 Best Android Emulators for Linux

Filed under
OS
Android
Linux

The emulator is software on a computer system that behaves like another computer system. When I am talking about Android Emulators for Linux, it means a program for Linux that runs like the Android environment. It is used by developers and testers to test their apps for Android using the Linux system. You can run Android apps and games on your Linux system. Emulators are also used by gamers to run Android games on their system. I have already listed best Android Emulators for PC but that basically included Android Emulators for Windows and Mac. So, I decided to make a dedicated list of Android Emulators for Linux.

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Puppy Linux Tahr 6.0.5 review: Tahrpup 6.0.5 Features and Advantages

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Reviews

By now you have got the point that instead of the small size Puppy Linux provides lots of tools for customizing the desktop. Options including the wallpaper changer, theme changer, theme maker, icon changer, etc. there are many more to explore.

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From Nexus to Android One: a brief history of purist Android phones

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Android

Android has been around for so long, and in so many forms, that the open-source operating system has evolved on multiple fronts thanks to the frantic competition among the many vendors using the platform.

For all the bells and whistles of Samsung, LG and HTC, there’s always been a market for something a little purer – a 'stock' OS that strips away all the third-party bloat for an experience that’s as close to Google’s vision of Android as it’s possible to get.

From the evolution of Google's Nexus smartphone range (and their successors, the improving Google Pixel phones) to the simultaneous innovation of Android One, pure Android devices have carved out more than one niche for themselves. It’s been quite the journey, and the story isn’t over yet...

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Programming: Learning and Python

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Development

KDE: Akademy, BSD, Krita and Lays Rodrigues

Filed under
KDE
  • Me, at Akademy 2018 - Winds of Change - FOSS in India Recap (late post

    Akademy is an annual conference organized by the KDE Community. It’s the place where contributors of all kinds from past and present meet, showcase their work and discuss things that shape the future of the KDE Software. This year's Akademy was held in the TU Wien, in the beautiful and historic city of Vienna, Austria.

    First of all, I'd like to apologize for being late on this post as just after reaching home, I had a minor motorcycle accident, and which was followed shortly by prolonged illness.

    I've been a KDE guy since the beginning of my technology career as an open source evangelist, entrepreneur, and developer. This year, I got the opportunity to showcase my work in front of the great people I've always admired.

    [...]

    The current state of India in regards to Free and Open Source Software is somewhat optimistic, with more and more states of India bringing in IT policies which gives priority to free and open source solutions.

  • Modern KDE on FreeBSD

    New stuff in the official FreeBSD repositories! The X11 team has landed a newer version of libinput, opening up the way for KDE Plasma 5.14 in ports. That’s a pretty big update and it may frighten people with a new wallpaper.

    What this means is that the graphical stack is once again on-par with what Plasma upstream expects, and we can get back to chasing releases as soon as they happen, rather than gnashing our teeth at missing dependencies. The KDE-FreeBSD CI servers are in the process of being upgraded to 12-STABLE, and we’re integrating with the new experimental CI systems as well. This means we are chasing sensibly-modern systems (13-CURRENT is out of scope).

  • KDE4 on FreeBSD, post-mortem

    The KDE-FreeBSD team has spent the past month or more, along with FreeBSD ports committers and maintainers who have other KDE4-related ports, in bringing things up-to-date with recent KDE-Frameworks-based releases, with hunting down alternatives, and with making the tough call that some things are just going away. Thanks to Rene for doing the portmgr commits to clean it up (r488762, r488763, r488764 and followups to remove KDE4-options from other ports) .

  • Interview with Phoenix

    What I love about Krita is that it doesn’t take up that much RAM compared to other softwares I have used. It makes it really easy to record speedpaints for YouTube.

  • [Krita] Statistics Are Fun!

    Collectively we removed 648,887 lines of code and added 996,142 lines of code. Of course… Lines of code and numbers of commits doesn’t say a whole lot. But we’ve currently got 580,268 lines of C++, 12,054 lines of Python code out of a total of 607,193 lines of code. There are 30 libraries, 151 plugins, 243 automated tests (of which 5 are failing).

  • New home page =D

    Using Vuetify framework, that is built above Vue.Js I was able to build a new landing page with information about me and the stuff that I do. On that page you will be able to find my projects, presentations and contact information. I’ve also added a page of Tips & Tricks with content that I think that has value.

Screenshots/Screencasts: Peppermint OS, Chakra Linux and AcademiX

Filed under
GNU
Linux

OPTPOLINES - Formerly Relpolines, Lower Overhead To Retpolines For Spectre Mitigation

Filed under
Linux
Security

It's been nearly one year to the day since the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities were made public. While the security vulnerabilities were quickly buttoned up in the Linux space, kernel developers continue working to offset the performance overhead introduced by these mitigations. They made a lot of overhead reductions in 2018 while still there are some patch-sets pending still for bettering the experience. One of these patch-sets was known as "Relpolines" but now has been updated and morphed into what is being called Optpolines.

Relpolines were announced a few months ago by a VMware developer as having lower overhead than Retpolines -- the return trampolines introduced as part of the Spectre mitigations back in January. The dynamic indirect call promotion work by VMware has been working on pairing relative calls and trampolines to reduce the overall Retpoline overhead. VMware found with their original patches it could deliver a 10% performance improvement to the Nginx web server, +4% for Redis, and other minor performance improvements -- well, recovering previously lost performance.

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Also: The Linux Kernel In 2018 Summed Up: Spectre/Meltdown, CoC, Speck Fears, New Features

Open-Source / Linux Letdowns For 2018

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OSS

While 2018 was a grand year for open-source and Linux as we've been recapping all of the highlights in recent days on Phoronix, it wasn't without some shortcomings or areas that have yet to pan out... As we end 2018, for some interesting New Year's Eve discussions in the forums, here is a look at some of the biggest Linux/open-source letdowns of the year.

Here are what I personally consider to be some of the biggest letdowns of the year. Feel free to chime in with your own open-source letdowns in the forums.

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What Is Ubuntu? The Past and Present of the Ubuntu Linux Distro

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution in the world. It may (or may not) be the best, but it is definitely the most popular. The distribution, or packaged “brand” of Linux, is developed by Canonical Ltd. for use on desktops, servers, and many other applications.

Ubuntu is also the most popular operating system in the cloud. It’s the operating system Google built its Android development tools around. Ubuntu was the first Linux distribution supported by Valve for Steam. When most people think of Linux, they’re probably thinking about Ubuntu.

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More in Tux Machines

Lilbits: A new Linux-based tablet OS, and the latest Bond villain is… product placement?

A Chinese company has been teasing a new Linux-based operating system designed for tablets for the past few weeks, promising to release JingOS, “the world’s first iPadOS-style Linux distro” on January 31. But it looks like the operating system may not only be for tablets – the company’s latest tease shows the operating system running on an 8 inch convertible mini-laptop that looks a lot like the Chuwi MiniBook. Read more

Games: Unvanquished, Raft, Transport Fever 2, FreeSpace 2 and More

  • Unvanquished Open-Source Game Still Pushing Slowly Ahead In 2021 - Phoronix

    Nearly a decade ago we were intrigued by Unvanquished as one of the most interesting open-source game/engine projects of the time. It was peculiar in going through dozens of alpha releases prior to drying up a few years ago. There hasn't been any major release yet past the prior alpha state but the project is in fact still moving along and issued their first new (point) release of the year as well as rolling out a new online updater.

  • How to play Raft on Linux

    Raft is a first-person survival video game developed by Redbeet Interactive and published by Axolot Games. The game was released in 2018 for Microsoft Windows. Raft does not have a native Linux version, and currently, there are no plans to release one. In this guide, we’ll show you how to set up Raft on Linux.

  • Google open sources VR painting app Tilt Brush | GamingOnLinux

    Tilt Brush, a popular VR app that lets users paint in a 3D space. Originally from Skillman & Hackett, it was later acquired by Google and now they've open sourced it. In an announcement post, Google mentioned it is no longer actively developed and so they are putting it out into the open fully into users hands and so it's now on GitHub under the Apache license. A few systems did get adjusted for the open source release due to licensing but nothing major.

  • Roboggled: A Puzzle Game Developed on Linux: Review

    Roboggled is a puzzle game, where you play as a robot that moves crates around. The game is presented in a 3D, top-down manner. The goal is to move the crate(s) in the level to an opening vault on the floor. Then, you’ll move on to the next level. Note: review copy sent to our curator. If you’re a game developer and want us to test your game, send it our way via Steam! Controls are very simple: just use the arrow keys on your keyboard or the analog stick/D-pad on your gamepad to move the robot around. If it’s pressing against a crate, simply moving in the direction of the crate will cause it to move. The robot will move one square at a time, but if it’s on ice, it won’t stop until it hits a wall or gets back on solid ground. So, at times, moving the crate towards its goal will require some strategy. If you made a mistake, you can go back one move by clicking the double-arrow icon on the top-right corner of the screen or pressing the left-shoulder button, or to restart entirely, click the single arrow at the top-left or press BACK on your controller. [...] I mentioned earlier the game is presented in top-down view. The background is this greenish color with white rectangles moving about. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but I think it would be pretty cool if there was an option to change the green color to something else. The soundtrack is hit or miss. While it has some good tunes, others are a little more…creepy, if you will. If there was an option or hotkey to change tracks, that would be great. Also, I think it would be of benefit of the music had a slider volume; right now there’s just an on and off toggle. The built-in level editor is pretty nice, but it’s a bit wonky. For instance, there are certain blocks on the grid that can’t have an item on it, particularly the blocks along the edge of the grid. For a price of $2, you really can’t go wrong here, though. Roboggled is a pretty decent puzzle game, and a plus is that there’s a Linux version and replayability value due to the in-game level editor.

  • How to Play Windows Games on Linux - LinuxLinks

    Windows is undoubtedly the most popular operating system for gaming. But it lacks various security measures. More and more people are switching to Linux because it has a very user-friendly interface and is more stable after updates than Windows. However, some are reluctant to try Linux out. It is namely because of a widespread notion that video games are unplayable on this operating system. Linux can run the same software like Windows, including web browsers, word processors, etc. There are far fewer games created exclusively for Linux. This operating system has witnessed major advances in recent years. Gaming enthusiasts can play the latest titles on their Linux OS with emulators and compatibility layers. So let’s explore this further and learn how you can play Windows games on Linux.

  • Dead Cells: Fatal Falls gives us more good excuses for another run

    Dead Cells: Fatal Falls is the latest DLC out now for the supremely stylish mix of action-platforming and metroidvania elements in Dead Cells. This new small expansion will enable the developer to continue expanding the game for everyone, with plenty of free updates like they have done in the past. Much like the previous DLC with The Bad Seed, it's not huge but it does nicely expand on what's already good with more excellent combat encounters. You can expect to find two extra mid-game biomes with new enemies, weapons, traps, lore rooms and a green-fingered boss!

  • How to play Monster Hunter: World on Linux

    Monster Hunter: World is an action RPG developed and published by Capcom. It is the fifth entry in the franchise. It was released in 2018 on PS4, Xbox One, and PC. However, there are currently no plans for an official Linux release.

  • Transport Fever 2 to release Vulkan API support on February 23

    More Vulkan API goodness is coming with Urban Games announcing that Transport Fever 2 will release the big Vulkan update on February 23 along with a macOS version. It's positively rated by users overall so they've done well with it and a major graphics API change is no small thing to do. Great to see though, especially as another developer opting for an open graphics API rather than a closed one like DirectX. Hopefully, this will lay out the foundation for continued support and give Urban Games more wiggle room to make it an ever bigger game, or perhaps work towards a third game in the series. Currently the Vulkan API support is available in a Beta (Steam only until release) and so you can join in, to ensure the Linux version is nicely polished up and let them know of any issues found. You can find more info on the dedicated Steam Group they setup especially to gather feedback on the testing.

  • FreeSpace 2 Source Code Project releases version 21.0.0

    FreeSpace and FreeSpace 2 are two of the absolute best space shooters around, and thankfully FreeSpace 2 continues living on very nicely with the FreeSpace 2 Source Code Project. A new release is up after another year of work with version 21.0.0 going up today, January 27 2021. There's some big stuff included in this release too!

KDE: Krita and Systemd Plasma Applet

  • How to install Krita 4.4 on Linux Mint 20.1

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Krita 4.4 on Linux Mint 20.1. 

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  • Short film made with Krita

    My name is Lucija Oroz and I am a professional animator from Croatia. In my spare time I love to read about the human mind and human behavior. The film 45” is my master’s degree project, the largest project I ever did. While working on it, I was so afraid that something would go wrong that I was unable to finish it, so I decided to something to cheer myself up. I got the chance to experience a tandem parachute jump. I was so impressed: it was both scary and beautiful. That was how the idea was born to combine my film with emotions that people usually experience during good or bad moments in their life.

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  • Systemd Plasma Applet

    Just a short announcement that I pushed some commits to github https://github.com/jansenm/systemd-plasmoid and tagged a release 2.0.1. The first ever with a tag. Unfortunately I am not that sure I did that right so in case someone out there packages this and needs more just complain.

Graphics: NVIDIA, AMD and Intel's Latest

  • NVIDIA release the 460.39 Linux driver update, improved support for kernel 5.10+

    Ready for a new stable NVIDIA driver for Linux? There's a new one out now with added GPU support and some tidying up work done with bug fixes too.

  • AMD RDNA2 "Duty Cycle Scaling" Will Turn Off The GPU Under Heavy Load For Relief

    A new Radeon power management feature with RDNA2 graphics processors being exposed by the open-source Linux driver is Duty Cycle Scaling in the name of power/thermal management with a focus on low-power hardware. AMD graphics Duty Cycle Scaling is designed for "small power limit SKUs" and is designed to actually shut off the graphics core and power it back up based on current/power/temperature thresholds. Under heavy workloads, the AMD "DCS" functionality controlled by the graphics firmware will power down the GPU during heavy load scenarios for power/thermal relief before being powered back up to resume work.

  • Linux 5.12 Bringing VRR / Adaptive-Sync For Intel TIger Lake / Xe Graphics - Phoronix

    Finally with the upcoming Linux 5.12 cycle is support for Variable Rate Refresh (VRR) / Adaptive-Sync for Intel Tiger Lake "Gen12" Xe Graphics and newer.  The VRR/Adaptive-Sync support for the latest-generation Intel graphics with Tiger Lake and the likes of the forthcoming Rocket Lake, Alder Lake, and discrete DG1 graphics is now in order for the mainline kernel. The VRR enabling for Tiger Lake and newer was sent in this morning to DRM-Next ahead of the Linux 5.12 kernel. This effort has been going on for many months while now has reached the stage that it's ready for merging. 

  • Intel Iris Xe Discrete Card Will Only Work With Select CPUs and Motherboards

    These motherboards require a special BIOS that supports Intel Iris Xe, so the cards won’t be compatible with other systems.