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July 2018

Lubuntu Doesn’t Want to be the “distribution for old computers” Anymore

Filed under
News

The popular lightweight Linux distribution Lubuntu doen't want to focus specifically on older computers anymore.
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Mozilla is Evolving the Firefox Brand (New Logo/s)

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Evolving the Firefox Brand

    Say “Firefox” and most people think of a web browser on their laptop or phone, period. TL;DR, there’s more to the story now, and our branding needs to evolve.

    With the rapid evolution of the internet, people need new tools to make the most of it. So Firefox is creating new types of browsers and a range of new apps and services with the internet as the platform. From easy screen-shotting and file sharing to innovative ways to access the internet using voice and virtual reality, these tools will help people be more efficient, safer, and in control of their time online. Firefox is where purpose meets performance.

  • Jim Hall: What an icon says about you

    Once upon a time, the Netscape "N" was instantly recognizable as the web browser's brand icon. Later, the organization spun off into Mozilla, represented by a less memorable big red dragon head. Finally, we have Firefox, represented by a stylized fox wrapped around a small globe. The fox icon has represented the Firefox brand for years, although now the Firefox organization wants to change the brand icon.

    From an article in Venture Beat: "For most people, Firefox refers to a browser, but the company wants the brand to encompass all the various apps and services that the Firefox family of internet products cover," and "The fox with a flaming tail 'doesn't offer enough design tools to represent this entire product family'." The Firefox name will remain, but the branding will change.

  • Mozilla Is Changing Firefox Logo After Years, Wants Your Feedback

    When we think of the Firefox browser, the image of the red panda logo immediately comes to our mind. Mozilla is about to change that, and a redesigned logo will represent the versatility of products the company has started making.

    As per its blog post, Mozilla is going through possible design considerations and has invited users to post their comments. It wants to know whether the new design system still feels like Firefox, reinforces Firefox’s speed, reliability, wit and at the same time represents Mozilla’s position as a people over profit company.

The Dark Side of Containers: Protecting Container Data from Itself

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Security

Containers are virtualized but not by hypervisors. They can be deployed to a VM but are not VMs.

Both containers and VMs use server/host OS as the bottom two layers of the stack. In VM environments, the next level is the hypervisor followed by VMs containing guest OS, libraries (div/lib in Linux), and applications. A single VM runs two full operating systems: the host and guest OS.

In contrast, containers do not have a hypervisor layer. A container shares the host OS, housing only the libraries and application code and data. Container benefits include greater portability, less operational overhead, lower OS licensing and maintenance/support costs, and less expensive application development.

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How to upgrade from Ubuntu Linux 16.04 to 18.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

When Canonical's Ubuntu Linux 18.04 arrived, this outstanding Linux distribution had only one little problem: You couldn't directly jump from the last Long Term Support (LTS) version, Ubuntu 16.04, to the latest version. Now, with the release of the first point Ubuntu 18.04 update, Ubuntu 18.04.1, you can finally do it easily.

Of course, you could always update from one version of Ubuntu to the other. You just had to have your home directory on another partition or drive. Since most people don't bother with that, upgrading was a chore.

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Linux Apps may come to Chromebooks in Stable Channel In Version 69

Filed under
Linux
Google

We were originally hoping that Chrome OS version 68 would get Linux App support, but that wasn’t the case. Now, Chrome 69 is said to be released for the 4th September this year. (Not too long left to go) and the update has a strong chance to hit Google’s very own Chromebook first instead of the other Chromebook. This information is gleaned from several commits that suggest a review of the Crostini project will now finalise.

Without the upcoming update, Linux app support is already available on a fair amount of Chrome OS laptops that are running the Dev Channel version of the Chrome OS. The fair amount of Chrome OS laptops, which includes Google’s own Pixelbook and HP’s Chromebook x2, can potentially run Linux Apps. But, as many of these laptops are not high specification machines, they might (will) struggle to adequately run Linux Apps.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Nostalgia of Old Games

    I have never been much of a gamer.  However, I admit that, back as a Windows user, I got hooked on several titles, such as "Doom," "Heretic," and "Tomb Rider-- The Last Revelation".

    My favorite games, though, were SNES ROMs that my brother, Megatotoro, taught me how to play with ZSNES.  Among them, I  recall "Super Puyo Puyo," "The Violinist of Hameln," "The 7th Saga," and "Bahamut Lagoon".

    Today I found the old ROMs and, using WINE, I played them for a short while.

  • Hortonworks Helps JIDO Implement Enterprise Data Mgmt Platform; Shaun Bierweiler Comments

    The Defense Department’s Joint Improvised Threat Defeat Organization has collaborated with Hortonworks to implement an enterprise information technology platform equipped with the Hadoop data management software and other open-source tools, Federal News Radio reported Friday.

    The report noted the use of such open-source tools has helped JIDO to focus more on the deployment of mission capabilities to warfighters than the infrastructure.

  • Applications Open for Federal OER Grant

    The U.S. Department of Education’s first grant for open educational resources, totaling $5 million, will be awarded in late September to between one and three applicants, the department announced today in a call for proposals published in the Federal Register.

    In an effort to develop OER content that can be disseminated to the widest possible audience for the largest possible savings, the department plans to award grants to one, two or three consortia that each include at least three higher education institutions, subject matter and technology experts, and an advisory group of at least five employers or work-force representatives.

  • Magic Leap details what its mixed reality OS will look like

    It really seems like the startup is finally getting ready to showcase something. The company says that its device will begin shipping this summer and is already in developer hands. Based on what Magic Leap has shown here, the interface looks like it’ll feel very familiar as opposed to some other AR interfaces that have adopted a pretty heavy-handed futuristic look.

  • Excessive heat from late-2013 MacBook Pro under macOS 10.14 ‘Mojave’

    I initially ignored the problem and attributed it to either the higher ambient temperature caused by the heatwave sweeping across Northern Europe or some preview-release specific issue. However, as the forth beta release came and went I started to look into the issue in more detail.

    The processor temperature, measured with the Intel Power Gadget, when the computer was under no load and idling (processor utilization under 5 %) was stuck at around 70℃. The high base temperature makes the machine hot to the touch, and also causes thermal throttling of the processor when you actually want to get something done.

    I thought that the internals fans or air passages might be blocked by dust and debris. The machine would get hot mere minutes after boot, and it sounded like the fans operated normally. However, this model MacBook Pro has received a meager iFixit repairability score of 1 out of 10 and I didn’t even want to attempt to take it apart if I could avoid it.

  • How a Bunch of Lava Lamps Protect Us From Hackers [sic]

     

    Here’s how it works. Every time you log in to any website, you’re assigned a unique identification number. It should be random, because if hackers [sic] can predict the number, they’ll impersonate you. Computers, relying as they do on human-coded patterns, can’t generate true randomness—but nobody can predict the goopy mesmeric swirlings of oil, water, and wax. Cloudflare films the lamps 24/7 and uses the ever-changing arrangement of pixels to help create a superpowered cryptographic key. “Anything that the camera captures gets incorporated into the randomness,” says Nick Sullivan, the company’s head of cryptography, and that includes visitors milling about and light streaming through the windows. (Any change in heat subtly affects the undulations of those glistening globules.)

GNOME/GUADEC and KDE Software With Microsoft/Windows DRM

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Back from GUADEC 2018

    Been a while since GUADEC 2018 has ended but subsequent travels and tasks reduced the time to write up a quick summary of what happened during this year’s GNOME conference.

  • GUADEC Thoughts

    This month I had the amazing opportunity to attend GUADEC, the GNOME community conference in Europe! The GNOME Foundation generously sponsored this trip as part of my Google Summer of Code project and I can’t thank them enough!

  • Krita in the Windows Store: an update

    We’ve published Krita in the Windows store for quite some time now. Not quite a year, but we’ve updated our Store listing almost twenty times. By far the majority of users get Krita from this website: about 30,000 downloads a week. Store downloads are only about 125 a week. Still, the income generated makes it possible for the Krita maintainer to work on Krita full-time, which would not have been possible otherwise.

    That’s good, because combining a day job and working on Krita is a sure recipe for a burn-out. (Donations fund Dmitry’s work, but there aren’t enough donations to fund two people at the same time: we have about 2000 euros per month in donations.)

GNU/Linux Miscellany

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Dell's XPS 13 Developer Edition now ships with Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS

    LINUX FANS CAN WE GET A 'HUZZAH'? because Dell has finally pulled up its trousers and released a Developer Edition of the 2018 XPS 13.

    The 9379 model, in case you're asking, will arrive running Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS, the latest version of the non-Windows 10 operating system. For developers and people who worship at the church of Torvalds, that should be a boon as previous Developer Editions of the XPS 13 have come with the outdated Ubuntu 16.04.

    And if you can't shell out for a Developer Edition XPS 13 this time around, which will set you back something in the area of £1,300 for a decently-specced model, Dell has plans to keep knocking out XPS machines with Ubuntu.

  • Linux apps will now run better on low-memory Chromebooks

    Earlier this year, Linux apps on Chrome launched on the Pixelbook, a speedy Chromebook with 8GB RAM. Since then, dozens of devices have received support from low-end to high-end, and even ARM Chromebooks too. A recent Chromium commit introduces better resource management for Linux apps on Chrome OS by dynamically managing RAM – great news for low-memory Chromebooks.

  • Microsoft boosts Office 2019 price by 10% [Ed: With proprietary software and so-called 'cloud' you're not in control of your finances, let alone your data, your PC etc.]

    Microsoft plans to raise the price of its perpetually-licensed Office suite by 10% in October.

  • Mageia Roundup 2018 – Weeks 28-30, an Anniversary, RMLL and more

    Astonishing numbers of people in the northern hemisphere have been vacationing, harvesting, fighting fires – but there’s still a heap of work happening. Thanks, Mageians!

    Mageia 6.1 is getting closer all the time, and in the meantime, some of you might have noticed that the Mageia 5->6 update is now available through the systray icon – it’s been enabled once more. To have it work, you need to re-enable “check for new releases” in the Updates Frequency settings in Mageia Control Centre. You’ll also see a different version of the tray icon – instead of the blue circle with the down arrow, you’ll see the orange circle with a round arrow. This is to let you know that Mageia 5 is now officially out of date.

    Some info from the QA team: if you’re upgrading from KDE4 to Plasma, there could be some issues with older video cards. If you’re not sure, make certain before you update that you have another, non-KDE desktop environment installed – XFce is usually problem-free. Log in to that non-KDE environment before you begin the update.

    As with all larger updates, if you’re using a laptop, connect to AC power and make sure you have plenty of disk space available and a reliable internet connection.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (May and June 2018)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    Andre Bianchi
    Simon Quigley
    Andrius Merkys
    Tong Sun
    James Lu
    Raphaël Halimi
    Paul Seyfert
    Dustin Kirkland
    Yanhao Mo
    Paride Legovini

  • UK Government Publishes List of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Security Tips

    The UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (part of GCHQ) has issued a new report full of advice on how to improve the security of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    The NCSC is a (relatively new) section of the UK government responsible for issuing security advice to the public, businesses and private sector stakeholders on how to avoid computer security threats.

    It’s also responsible for co-ordinating a response to any major online security incidents or breaches.

  • Ubuntu Linux-based Lubuntu no longer focusing on old hardware after move to LXQt

    Ubuntu is a great Linux distribution, but understandably, the GNOME desktop environment isn't for everyone. Thankfully, there are many flavors of the operating system with alternative DEs, such as Xubuntu with XFCe and Kubuntu with KDE. Ultimately, with so much choice, you should have no problem finding a version of Ubuntu that best meets your needs and wants.

    One popular Ubuntu flavor is Lubuntu. If you aren't familiar, it uses the lightweight LXDE desktop environment which makes it a good choice for older hardware. In fact, one of the focuses of the Lubuntu developers is to support aging computers. When Lubunu 18.10 is released in October 2018, it will ditch LXDE for the newer LXQt. Despite it also being a desktop environment that is easy on resources, the Lubuntu developers are planning to drop their focus on old hardware after the transition.

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  • This Could Be Google Pixel 3 XL “Clearly White” — Leaks Suggest
  • Fortnite For Android Will Launch On These 40 Android Smartphones
  • 6 Best Android Gestures Apps To Get iPhone X Gestures In 2018

More in Tux Machines

Malicious Proprietary Software From Microsoft and Google

  • Microsoft rolls out a new update for Surface Duo SDK Preview

    The new update is available for Mac, Windows and Ubuntu....

  • Microsoft Brings Its Windows 10 Antivirus Arsenal to Linux [Ed: Wow. Softpedia's "LINUX" section (Popa) is now an arm of Microsoft proprietary software marketing. Sure missing Marius Nester there. Whose arsenal is this? NSA's?]
  • Microsoft: Linux Defender antivirus now in public preview, iOS and Android are next [Ed: Of course Microsoft's sponsored propaganda network also promotes Microsoft proprietary software in the “LINUX” section. It does this all the time. The site has also just put "GitHub: We won't take down any of your content unless we really have to" under the "LINUX" section because proprietary software (GitHub) is somehow "LINUX"?!]
  • Chrome deploys deep-linking tech in latest browser build despite privacy concerns

    Google has implemented a browser capability in Chrome called ScrollToTextFragment that enables deep links to web documents, but it has done so despite unresolved privacy concerns and lack of support from other browser makers. Via Twitter on Tuesday, Peter Snyder, privacy researcher at privacy-focused browser maker Brave Software, observed that ScrollToTextFragment shipped earlier this month in Chrome 80 unflagged, meaning it's active, despite privacy issues that have been raised. "Imposing privacy and security leaks to existing sites (many of which will never be updated) REALLY should be a 'don't break the web,' never-cross redline," he wrote. "This spec does that." The debate over the feature percolated last year on mailing lists and in GitHub issues posts and picked up in October when the team working on Chrome's Blink engine declared their intent to implement the specification. The feature rollout serves to illustrate that the consensus-based web standards process doesn't do much to constrain the technology Google deploys.

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  • New Mexico Sues Google Over Collection of Children's Data
           
             

    New Mexico’s attorney general sued Google Thursday over allegations the tech company is illegally collecting personal data generated by children in violation of federal and state laws.

Security: Debian LTS Work, Various Patches, Honeypots/Honeynets and FUD (Marketing)

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, January 2020

    January started calm until at the end of the month some LTS contributors met, some for the first time ever, at the Mini-DebCamp preceeding FOSDEM in Brussels. While there were no formal events about LTS at both events, such face2face meetings have proven to be very useful for future collaborations! We currently have 59 LTS sponsors sponsoring 219h each month. Still, as always we are welcoming new LTS sponsors!

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (openjpeg2), Debian (cloud-init, jackson-databind, and python-reportlab), Red Hat (ksh, python-pillow, systemd, and thunderbird), Slackware (proftpd), SUSE (java-1_7_0-ibm, nodejs10, and nodejs12), and Ubuntu (ppp and squid, squid3). 

  • Honeypots and Honeynets
  • Up close and personal with Linux malware [Ed: ESET trying to sell its useless proprietary software for a platform that does not need it]

    Chances are that the very word ‘Linux’ conjures up images of near-impenetrable security. However, Linux-based computer systems and applications running on them increasingly end up in the crosshairs of bad actors, and recent years have seen discoveries of a number of malicious campaigns that hit Linux systems, including botnets that were made up of thousands of Linux servers. These mounting threats have challenged the conventional thinking that Linux is more or less spared the problems that affect other operating systems, particularly Windows.

Events: ONES, SUSECON and FOSDEM

  • Linux Foundation, LF Networking, and LF Edge Announce Keynote Speakers for Open Networking & Edge Summit North America 2020

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-hosts LF Networking, the umbrella organization fostering collaboration and innovation across the entire open networking stack, and LF Edge, the umbrella organization building an open source framework for the edge, today announced initial keynote speakers for Open Networking & Edge Summit (ONES) North America 2020. The event takes place April 20-21 in Los Angeles, California. Open Networking & Edge Summit (formerly Open Networking Summit) is the industry’s premier open networking event now expanded to comprehensively cover Edge Computing, Edge Cloud and IoT. The event enables collaborative development and innovation across enterprises, service providers/telcos and cloud providers to shape the future of networking and edge computing with a deep focus on technical, architectural and business discussions in the areas of Open Networking & AI/ML-enabled use cases for 5G, IoT, Edge and Enterprise deployment, as well as targeted discussions on Edge/IoT frameworks and blueprints across Manufacturing, Retail, Oil and Gas, Transportation and Telco Edge cloud, among other key areas.

  • SUSE welcomes Dublin City University students at SUSECON 2020

    DCU relies on SUSE to support their IT infrastructure. DCU also utilize our academic program for teaching and training Open Source technologies in the classroom, so when the idea came to invite a university to SUSECON, they were a perfect fit. Nearly 50 master’s students and a handful of teaching staff from the Faculty of Engineering and Computing are looking forward to attending this year’s SUSECON. MSc and M.Eng students from the School of Computing and the School of Electronic Engineering will be in attendance throughout the week. The event will provide numerous opportunities for the students to learn from and engage with industry experts from companies like SUSE, Microsoft and SAP.

  • Follow-up on the train journey to FOSDEM

    Here’s a recap of my train journey based on the Twitter thread I kept posting as I travelled.

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: Clear Linux, Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop Team, MX Linux 19.1

  • Clear Linux | The Fastest Linux Distro?

    Clear Linux | The Fastest Linux Distro? Let's do a deep dive into Clear Linux and go through the installation, configuration, and overall setup for it on your System.

  • Brunch with Brent: Heather Ellsworth | Jupiter Extras 57

    Brent sits down with Heather Ellsworth, Software Engineer on Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop Team, a GNOME Foundation Member, and former Purism Librem 5 Documentation Engineer. We discuss her deep history in experimental high energy physics at CERN, the similarities and synergies between the sciences and software engineering, her love of documentation, her newly established maintainership of LibreOffice, and how empathy factors into good bug reporting.

  • MX Linux 19.1 overview | simple configuration, high stability, solid performance

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of MX Linux 19.1 and some of the applications pre-installed.