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July 2018

Dell XPS 13 Kabylake Makes For A Great Linux Laptop

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When it comes to new laptops for the summer of 2018 that are Linux-friendly, the latest-generation Dell XPS 13 with Intel Kabylake-R processor ranks high on that list. Recent in upgrading my main production workstation, I decided to go with the Dell XPS 13 9370 while using Fedora Workstation 28 and it's been a phenomenal combination. Here are my thoughts on the current Dell XPS 13 as well as some benchmarks and other information.

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Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Here's the New Login Screen of Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) with Yaru Theme

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the most attractive things about the forthcoming Ubuntu 18.10 operating system, due for release later this fall on October 18, 2018, is its new look and feel, which is provided by the so-called Communitheme that was recently renamed as Yaru, a system-wide theme for Ubuntu Desktop.

As part of this community initiative, Ubuntu 18.10 will get a brand-new look and feel that will make the popular computer operating system more modern, more accessible, and more attractive. And, today we finally have a first look at the Yaru theme on the current Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) development release.

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Red Hat's Latest Articles, OpenShift, and Finance

Filed under
Red Hat
  • How to be the lazy sysadmin

    The job of a Linux SysAdmin is always complex and often fraught with various pitfalls and obstacles. Ranging from never having enough time to do everything, to having the Pointy-Haired Boss (PHB) staring over your shoulder while you try to work on the task that she or he just gave you, to having the most critical server in your care crash at the most inopportune time, problems and challenges abound. I have found that becoming the Lazy Sysadmin can help.

  • What's in a container image: Meeting the legal challenges

    Container technology has, for many years, been transforming how workloads in data centers are managed and speeding the cycle of application development and deployment.

    In addition, container images are increasingly used as a distribution format, with container registries a mechanism for software distribution. Isn't this just like packages distributed using package management tools? Not quite. While container image distribution is similar to RPMs, DEBs, and other package management systems (for example, storing and distributing archives of files), the implications of container image distribution are more complicated. It is not the fault of container technology itself; rather, it's because container distribution is used differently than package management systems.

  • The top requirement for high-impact teams

    What is the top requirement for high-impact teams? When I was recently asked this question, I started making a list.

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift Origin 3.10 Release Update with Derek Carr and Mike Barrett (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Derek Carr and Mike Barrett walk us thru what’s new in OpenShift Origin Release 3.10

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: IoT Edge Deployments on OpenShift with RHEL – Luca Gabella (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Alessandro Arrichiello, Luca Bigotta and Luca Gabella (Red Hat) walk us thru leveraging containers  for IoT Edge Deployments: in this scenario and discuss how developers are using OpenShift  to build Edge Applications. Then they walked us thru  a real use case scenario how developers can leverage OpenShift features for enabling Hybrid deployments on standalone Red Hat Enterprise Linux. In the demonstration, they also show using OpenShift’s Ansible Service Broker for automating the external deployment, and talked about using Ansible Tower when large scale ones will be needed.

  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Dips 3.16% for July 30
  • Stock Under Review: Red Hat (NYSE: RHT)
  • Are Investors need vacation from Autodesk, Inc. (ADSK) and Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?

Istio 1.0

Filed under
Server
  • IBM & Google Launch 'Istio' Cloud Software, but Amazon & Microsoft Skip the Party

    Istio, an open source project backed by IBM, Google, Red Hat and others for connecting, managing and securing Kubernetes containers, hits version 1.0 Tuesday. But can Istio become ubiquitous without support from market leaders Amazon Web Services and Microsoft?

    Istio, also backed by Lyft Inc. and Pivotal , is a "service mesh," picking up where Kubernetes leaves off. Kubernetes provides orchestration to run multiple containers, manage their lifecycle, keep them available and scale them up and down as needed. Istio is software for managing how containers interact with each other.

  • The Istio service mesh hits version 1.0
  • What is Istio? The latest open source project out of Google
  • Istio sets sail as Red Hat renovates OpenShift container ship

    Red Hat is celebrating the 1.0 release of Istio, the open source microservices management project, and the arrival of version 3.10 of its OpenShift software container platform.

    Istio's 1.0 release received mention at Google Cloud Next last week, but the official bits are expected on Tuesday. The software serves as a management mechanism for distributed microservices, providing capabilities like traffic management, service identity and security, policy enforcement and telemetry among apps running across multiple Kubernetes clusters and hosts.

  • IBM, Google, Red Hat push Istio to 1.0 release

    IBM launched Istio along with Google Cloud and Lyft a little more than a year ago. The goal of Istio is to give developers a vendor-neutral way to connect, secure and manage networks of various microservices.

    Managing microservices is a critical issue since enterprises are increasingly built on them. By breaking services and applications into smaller parts developers can be more agile. The issue is that managing various microservices requires a good bit of choreography.

Google’s Edge TPU AI chip will run on a USB stick computer

Filed under
Android
Linux

Google followed up on its Edge TPU machine learning chip announcement by unveiling a USB Type-C based version that you can plug into any Linux or Android Things computer, including a Raspberry Pi. There are also new details on the Edge TPU dev board.

Following Google’s announcement of an embedded friendly Edge TPU version of its Tensor Processing Unit AI chip and the related Cloud IoT Edge stack for IoT gateways, the company announced a USB stick computer version of Edge TPU that can work with any Linux or Android Things computer. It also posted more details on the upcoming, NXP-based Edge TPU development kit, including its SoC: an NXP i.MX8M.

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UK's National Cyber Security Centre Give Advice on Securing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Dubbed Bionic Beaver, the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system was launched in April 2018 as the latest release of Canonical's popular Ubuntu Linux OS, and it's a long-term support release that will receive security and software updates for the next five years, until April 2023. The Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS point release is also available for download and includes all the latest security updates.

Being based on the Linux kernel, Ubuntu is already a secure computer operating system compared to Windows or macOS, but if you're living in the UK (United Kingdom) and you need to configure your Ubuntu 18.04 LTS installations for maximum security, the National Cyber Security Centre tells you how.

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KDE Plasma 5.13.4 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 45 Improvements

Filed under
KDE

Coming almost three weeks after the KDE Plasma 5.13.3 release, the KDE Plasma 5.13.4 maintenance update continues to improve the stability and performance of the KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment by adding total of 48 changes and bug fixes across various components, including the Plasma Desktop, Plasma Discover, Plasma Workstation, KScreen, KWin, Plasma Add-ons, Info Center, Breeze Plymouth, and others.

"Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.13.4. Plasma 5.13 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds two week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads today's announcement.

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Story of GNOME Shell Extensions

Filed under
GNOME

A long time ago (exactly 10 years ago) it was decided that the the shell for GNOME would be written in JavaScript. GNOME 3 was still looking for its new face, a lot of UI experimentation was taking place, and JavaScript looked like the best candidate for it. Moreover it was a popular language on the web, so barriers to entry for new contributors would be significantly lowered.

When you have the shell written in JavaScript you can very easily patch it and alter its look and behaviour. And that’s what people started doing. Upstream was not very keen to officially support extensions due to their nature: they’re just hot patching the GNOME Shell code. They have virtually unlimited possibilities in changing look and behaviour, but also in introducing instability.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor

  • NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor
    NVMM provides hardware-accelerated virtualization support for NetBSD. It is made of an ~MI frontend, to which MD backends can be plugged. A virtualization API is shipped via libnvmm, that allows to easily create and manage virtual machines via NVMM. Two additional components are shipped as demonstrators, toyvirt and smallkern: the former is a toy virtualizer, that executes in a VM the 64bit ELF binary given as argument, the latter is an example of such binary.
  • NetBSD Gains Hardware Accelerated Virtualization
    NetBSD, the highly portable Unix-like Open Source operating system known for its platform diversity, has gained hardware-accelerated virtualization support via an improved NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor (NVMM).

GNU Releases: mailutils, cflow, tar and parallel

Devices: AArch64, Siemens/Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL), Raspberry Pi and Xiaomi

  • We need Arm64 systems for developers. Again.
    Getting AArch64 hardware for developers is important. When it happen? One day. Maybe even before people forget that such architecture existed. We talk about it during each Linaro Connect. So far nothing serious came from it. We had some failed attempts like Cello or Husky. There is Synquacer with own set of issues. Some people use MACCHIATObin. Some still use Applied Micro Mustangs which should get a place in computer museums. It is chicken and egg issue. No one makes affordable AArch64 systems because no one buys them. Because no one makes them. Hardware vendors concentrate on server market — no chips to choose for developer systems.
  • Siemens PLM Software announces enterprise Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) solution
    Siemens PLM Software announced an enterprise Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) solution that provides electronics manufacturers secure, scalable and configurable distributions for industrial, medical, aerospace and defense applications. This MEL technology is a configurable distribution that provides an operating system platform for embedded systems development and is a result of the continued integration of the recently acquired embedded systems design capabilities from Mentor Graphics. The solution is based on Debian, an enterprise class, open source Linux operating system.
  • Siemens launches new enterprise class embedded Linux solution for embedded systems development
    With the growth of internet of things (IoT) and other smart devices, it is becoming increasingly complex and expensive for manufacturers to develop embedded distributions and applications for these devices based on the Linux® operating system. Siemens PLM Software today announced a new enterprise Mentor® Embedded Linux® (MEL) solution that provides electronics manufacturers secure, scalable and configurable distributions for industrial, medical, aerospace and defense applications. This new MEL technology is a configurable distribution that provides a robust operating system platform for embedded systems development and is a result of the continued integration of the recently acquired embedded systems design capabilities from Mentor Graphics. The solution is based on Debian, a broadly utilized, enterprise class, open source Linux operating system.
  • Raspberry Pi Begins Rolling Out The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    The Raspberry Pi folks have been working the past few months on upgrading their kernel in moving from Linux 4.14 to 4.19. That roll-out has now begun. Linux 4.19 has been the target of the Raspberry Pi Foundation due to this newer kernel being a Long-Term Support (LTS) release and thus will be maintained for the long-term. That large jump in the standard kernel version for Raspberry Pi ultimately means less work too for the developers involved: between 4.14 and 4,19, a lot of Raspberry Pi patches and other Broadcom improvements were upstreamed.
  • Raspberry Pi Updates Devices to Linux 4.19
  • Xiaomi’s 2019 goal is to release kernel source code more quickly for all its devices
    Just before MWC 2019, Xiaomi took to the stage at an event in China to launch the new Xiaomi Mi 9 and Mi 9 SE. Both the devices represent the best of what OEM has to offer, bringing in a high value device at a fraction of the cost of a premium flagship. While this approach lets them appeal to the average consumer, Xiaomi has also been quite developer-friendly, which makes them a good purchase even for those who are looking for a device with a very good third party development community. Xiaomi does not void the warranty of devices (in India at least) if you unlock the bootloader, and they have worked on significantly bringing down the waiting times for bootloader unlock requests too.