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May 2018

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Graphics DRM and Mesa 18.0.5 RC

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • A Reusable DRM Module To Be Worked On For "Underserved" Graphics Hardware

    While Kevin Brace of the OpenChrome project as the lead and only developer left working on this open-source VIA driver stack has restarted the discussion towards mainlining the OpenChrome DRM/KMS driver, he has decided to take a break from that for a few weeks and to focus on developing a "reusable DRM module" to help other vintage/obscure graphics hardware.

  • Mesa 18.0.5 release candidate

    The candidate for the Mesa 18.0.5 is now available. Currently we have:
    - 21 queued
    - 0 nominated (outstanding)
    - and 5 rejected patches

  • Mesa 18.0.5 Is The Last Planned Release In The Series

    Mesa 18.0.5 is the last planned point release for the Mesa 18.0 series that debuted at the end of March as the Q1'2018 release for Mesa3D.

    With Mesa 18.1 having been released earlier this month and on schedule, the Mesa 18.0 lifespan is relatively short with Mesa 18.1.1 now due for release in the days ahead. As such, the Mesa 18.0.5 release due out by the end of the week is their last planned maintenance release for this previous quarter's branch.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Software: HandBrake, Plex Media Player, zchunk, Qalculate! and Cherrytree

Filed under
Software
  • HandBrake FFmpeg, no more Nvidia 32 bit drivers

    HandBrake has been updated again to track the master branch, as it now uses FFMpeg 4 and no longer libAV 12. This could probably lead to other improvements, like NVENC/CUDA support, more formats, etc.

    Starting with the Nvidia drivers version 396.24 there will be no more 32 bit support, the driver will be 64 bit only. The 32 bit libraries are still included, so Steam and other applications will keep on being supported.

  • Plex Media Player is back!

    Just a small post to notify that Plex Media Player package is back. Now it does not require Conan or Python anymore for building, and you can just build it using standard tools, the dependency issues between the Plex binary packages have been resolved.

  • What is zchunk?

    Over the past few months, I’ve been working on zchunk, a compression format that is designed to allow for good compression, but, more importantly, the ability to download only the differences between an old version of the file and a new version.

    The concept is similar to both zsync and casync, but it has some important differences. Let’s first look at how downloading a zchunk file works.

  • Qalculate! – The Best Calculator Application in The Entire Universe

    I have been a GNU-Linux user and a Debian user for more than a decade. As I started using the desktop more and more, it seemed to me that apart from few web-based services most of my needs were being met with desktop applications within Debian itself.

    One of such applications was the need for me to calculate between different measurements of units. While there are and were many web-services which can do the same, I wanted something which could do all this and more on my desktop for both privacy reasons as well as not having to hunt for a web service for doing one thing or the other. My search ended when I found Qalculate!.

  • Cherrytree – A Feature-Rich Wiki-Style Note-Taking App

    I recently wrote on Thetapad and Zim – both are excellent note-taking applications with their specialty geared towards different users. Today, thanks to suggestions from FossMint readers, I introduce to you Cherrytree.

    Cherrytree is a free and open source note-taking application with wiki-style text formatting, syntax highlighting, and advanced customizability settings.

    Its advanced search function allows you to locate files across the file tree irrespective of their location. It supports keyboard shortcuts, importing and exporting notes, syncing with cloud services like Dropbox, rich text formatting, and password protection to keep your notes secure.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast from the UK, CPLANE.ai, Curl

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Linux Mint 19 Beta Will Arrive on June 4, Final Release Expected at End of June

Filed under
Linux

The developer published the monthly news of the project for May 2018, announcing that Linux Mint 19 will enter beta stages on Monday, June 4, 2018, when users will be able to download the Linux Mint 19 Beta ISO images with Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce desktop environments and participate in the beta testing program. The final release of Linux Mint 19 "Tara" is expected at the end of June.

"All 3 editions of Linux Mint 19 (Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce) are currently in QA. The various bugs which were found were fixed and we’re expecting them to pass QA tomorrow. We’re planning the BETA release for Monday the 4th," wrote Clement Lefebvre in the monthly newsletter. "The BETA phase for Mint 19 will be longer than usual, with a stable release planned for the end of June."

Read more

Linux Lite 4.0 "Diamond" Launches Officially Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Dubbed "Diamond" and powered by the Linux 4.15 kernel series from the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, Linux Lite 4.0 series launches officially today as the first release to drop support for 32-bit installations, bringing numerous updated components, new features and major design changes that include new system theme (Adapta) and icon sets (Papirus).

"Faenza icons were dropped as it had not been maintained in some time (albeit there is a fork) and the same for the Arc theme, development seems to have stalled there," said Jerry Bezencon in the release announcement. "Most of our approach to theming in Series 4.x follows the popular Flat design focus. We also now use the Openzone mouse theme."

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Desktop Consolidation Gives SparkyLinux a Clearer Focus

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

You can run SparkyLinux from a thumb drive. You also can supercharge its performance by loading it into your computer's RAM.

However, the OS is not really as useful if you use it only for a portable computing platform. It performs best when installed on the hard drive. SparkyLinux does not use a frugal installation and special antics to provide persistent memory.

SparkyLinux is a very functional Linux OS. It is a solid choice for use as an all-purpose home edition with all the tools, codecs, plugins and drivers preinstalled.

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How open source supports CERN's Large Hadron Collider

Filed under
Server
OSS

The 27-kilometre-long Large Hadron Collider (LHC) buried beneath the France-Switzerland border near Geneva is best known for helping to prove the existence of the Higgs' Boson particle - otherwise known as the God particle - crucial to the Standard Model of particle physics.

The LHC, which uses superconducting magnets to steer beams through its long pipes at just below the speed of light, is supported by open source IT systems at CERN to crunch through about 60 petabytes of data a year. These are built with Openstack, a free and open source software platform for building clouds.

The Openstack cloud first went into production at CERN in July 2013, marking the 13,000-physicist-strong laboratory as an early adopter. Today it has scaled to roughly 300,000 cores – and it's this kind of high-powered, scalable, open source cloud computing that got the attention of many private enterprises, now contributing to the code.

Read more

Also: Why You Should Do It Yourself

More in Tux Machines

Security: Linux, Docker and Guix

  • Unpatched Linux bug may open devices to serious attacks over Wi-Fi

    The flaw is located in the RTLWIFI driver, which is used to support Realtek Wi-Fi chips in Linux devices. The vulnerability triggers a buffer overflow in the Linux kernel when a machine with a Realtek Wi-Fi chip is within radio range of a malicious device. At a minimum, exploits would cause an operating-system crash and could possibly allow a hacker to gain complete control of the computer. The flaw dates back to version 3.10.1 of the Linux kernel released in 2013.

  • Docker Attack Worm Mines for Monero
  • Insecure permissions on profile directory (CVE-2019-18192)

    We have become aware of a security issue for Guix on multi-user systems that we have just fixed (CVE-2019-18192). Anyone running Guix on a multi-user system is encouraged to upgrade guix-daemon—see below for instructions. Context The default user profile, ~/.guix-profile, points to /var/guix/profiles/per-user/$USER. Until now, /var/guix/profiles/per-user was world-writable, allowing the guix command to create the $USER sub-directory. On a multi-user system, this allowed a malicious user to create and populate that $USER sub-directory for another user that had not yet logged in. Since /var/…/$USER is in $PATH, the target user could end up running attacker-provided code. See the bug report for more information. This issue was initially reported by Michael Orlitzky for Nix (CVE-2019-17365).

In 2019, multiple open source companies changed course—is it the right move?

Free and open source software enables the world as we know it in 2019. From Web servers to kiosks to the big data algorithms mining your Facebook feed, nearly every computer system you interact with runs, at least in part, on free software. And in the larger tech industry, free software has given rise to a galaxy of startups and enabled the largest software acquisition in the history of the world. Free software is a gift, a gift that made the world as we know it possible. And from the start, it seemed like an astounding gift to give. So astounding in fact that it initially made businesses unaccustomed to this kind of generosity uncomfortable. These companies weren't unwilling to use free software, it was simply too radical and by extension too political. It had to be renamed: "open source." Once that happened, open source software took over the world. Recently, though, there's been a disturbance in the open source force. Within the last year, companies like Redis Labs, MongoDB, and Confluent all changed their software licenses, moving away from open source licenses to more restrictive terms that limit what can be done with the software, making it no longer open source software. Read more Also: Network Time Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative

Red Hat: OpenShift, RHEL, Dependency Analytics, vDPA and More

  • Red Hat Expands the Kubernetes Developer Experience with Newest Version of Red Hat OpenShift 4

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced Red Hat OpenShift 4.2, the latest version of Red Hat’s trusted enterprise Kubernetes platform designed to deliver a more powerful developer experience. Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 extends Red Hat’s commitment to simplifying and automating enterprise-grade services across the hybrid cloud while empowering developers to innovate and enhance business value through cloud-native applications.

  • RHEL and Insights combo illuminates threats and spotlights performance for Red Hat systems

    When Red Hat Inc. officially rolled out its Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, or RHEL 8, operating system in May, the open-source software company also included Red Hat Insights with every subscription for the new release. Based on data supplied by one of the company’s top executives, that has proven to be a wise decision. Insights is a software as a service product that works from a rules-based engine to offer continuous connected analysis of registered Red Hat-based systems. “We’ve seen an 87% increase since May in the number of systems that are linked in,” said Stefanie Chiras (pictured), vice president and general manager of the RHEL Business Unit at Red Hat. “We’re seeing a 33% increase in coverage of rules-based and a 152% increase in customers who are using it. That creates a community of people using and getting value from it, but also giving value back because the more data we have the better the rules get.”

  • What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

    We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE. Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing. Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

  • Breaking cloud native network performance barriers

    Up until now we have covered virtio-networking and its usage in VMs. We started with the original vhost-net/virtio-net architecture, moved on to the vhost-user/virito-pmd architecture and continued to vDPA (vHost Data Path Acceleration) where the virtio ring layout was pushed all the way into the NIC providing wiresspeed/wirelatency to VMs. We now turn our attention to using vDPA for providing wirespeed/wirelatency L2 interfaces to containers leveraging kubernetes to orchestrate the overall solution. We will demonstrate how Containerized Network Functions (CNFs) can be accelerated using a combination of vDPA interfaces and DPDK libraries. The vDPA interfaces are added as a secondary interface to containers using the Multus CNI plugin. This post is a high level solution overview describing the main building blocks and how they fit together. We assume that the reader has an overall understanding of Kubernetes, the Container Network Interface (CNI) and NFV terminology such as VNFs and CNFs.

  • Top 5 stress reliefs for sysadmins

Purism shows off more pictures of Librem 5 Phone and PureOS UI

As the first batch of the Librem 5 phones starts reaching its respectful owners, we can now have a better look at the product from its pictures taken by the customers. Before we check them out, let’s get to know a bit more about these phones. The Librem 5 smartphones are powered by PureOS, which is a Linux-based mobile operating system. The brains behind this product, namely Purism, have made it their top priority to offer such phones that provide security, privacy, and freedom to the customers. Accordingly, this product has been made for people who want to have complete control over their phones. You should check out this article if you want to know more about the Librem 5 smartphones. Now coming back to the news, people who have ordered this phone are in for a treat as the Librem 5 comes with a black anodized aluminum case. Not only it’s stylish, but it also maintains high radio reception quality – thanks to its non-metal backing. It accompanies easier-to-slide, flush hardware kill switches. Read more Also: Nathan Wolf: New Life to Rock Candy Gamepad for PS3 | Another Repair