Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

May 2018

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Graphics DRM and Mesa 18.0.5 RC

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • A Reusable DRM Module To Be Worked On For "Underserved" Graphics Hardware

    While Kevin Brace of the OpenChrome project as the lead and only developer left working on this open-source VIA driver stack has restarted the discussion towards mainlining the OpenChrome DRM/KMS driver, he has decided to take a break from that for a few weeks and to focus on developing a "reusable DRM module" to help other vintage/obscure graphics hardware.

  • Mesa 18.0.5 release candidate

    The candidate for the Mesa 18.0.5 is now available. Currently we have:
    - 21 queued
    - 0 nominated (outstanding)
    - and 5 rejected patches

  • Mesa 18.0.5 Is The Last Planned Release In The Series

    Mesa 18.0.5 is the last planned point release for the Mesa 18.0 series that debuted at the end of March as the Q1'2018 release for Mesa3D.

    With Mesa 18.1 having been released earlier this month and on schedule, the Mesa 18.0 lifespan is relatively short with Mesa 18.1.1 now due for release in the days ahead. As such, the Mesa 18.0.5 release due out by the end of the week is their last planned maintenance release for this previous quarter's branch.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Software: HandBrake, Plex Media Player, zchunk, Qalculate! and Cherrytree

Filed under
Software
  • HandBrake FFmpeg, no more Nvidia 32 bit drivers

    HandBrake has been updated again to track the master branch, as it now uses FFMpeg 4 and no longer libAV 12. This could probably lead to other improvements, like NVENC/CUDA support, more formats, etc.

    Starting with the Nvidia drivers version 396.24 there will be no more 32 bit support, the driver will be 64 bit only. The 32 bit libraries are still included, so Steam and other applications will keep on being supported.

  • Plex Media Player is back!

    Just a small post to notify that Plex Media Player package is back. Now it does not require Conan or Python anymore for building, and you can just build it using standard tools, the dependency issues between the Plex binary packages have been resolved.

  • What is zchunk?

    Over the past few months, I’ve been working on zchunk, a compression format that is designed to allow for good compression, but, more importantly, the ability to download only the differences between an old version of the file and a new version.

    The concept is similar to both zsync and casync, but it has some important differences. Let’s first look at how downloading a zchunk file works.

  • Qalculate! – The Best Calculator Application in The Entire Universe

    I have been a GNU-Linux user and a Debian user for more than a decade. As I started using the desktop more and more, it seemed to me that apart from few web-based services most of my needs were being met with desktop applications within Debian itself.

    One of such applications was the need for me to calculate between different measurements of units. While there are and were many web-services which can do the same, I wanted something which could do all this and more on my desktop for both privacy reasons as well as not having to hunt for a web service for doing one thing or the other. My search ended when I found Qalculate!.

  • Cherrytree – A Feature-Rich Wiki-Style Note-Taking App

    I recently wrote on Thetapad and Zim – both are excellent note-taking applications with their specialty geared towards different users. Today, thanks to suggestions from FossMint readers, I introduce to you Cherrytree.

    Cherrytree is a free and open source note-taking application with wiki-style text formatting, syntax highlighting, and advanced customizability settings.

    Its advanced search function allows you to locate files across the file tree irrespective of their location. It supports keyboard shortcuts, importing and exporting notes, syncing with cloud services like Dropbox, rich text formatting, and password protection to keep your notes secure.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast from the UK, CPLANE.ai, Curl

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Linux Mint 19 Beta Will Arrive on June 4, Final Release Expected at End of June

Filed under
Linux

The developer published the monthly news of the project for May 2018, announcing that Linux Mint 19 will enter beta stages on Monday, June 4, 2018, when users will be able to download the Linux Mint 19 Beta ISO images with Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce desktop environments and participate in the beta testing program. The final release of Linux Mint 19 "Tara" is expected at the end of June.

"All 3 editions of Linux Mint 19 (Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce) are currently in QA. The various bugs which were found were fixed and we’re expecting them to pass QA tomorrow. We’re planning the BETA release for Monday the 4th," wrote Clement Lefebvre in the monthly newsletter. "The BETA phase for Mint 19 will be longer than usual, with a stable release planned for the end of June."

Read more

Linux Lite 4.0 "Diamond" Launches Officially Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Dubbed "Diamond" and powered by the Linux 4.15 kernel series from the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, Linux Lite 4.0 series launches officially today as the first release to drop support for 32-bit installations, bringing numerous updated components, new features and major design changes that include new system theme (Adapta) and icon sets (Papirus).

"Faenza icons were dropped as it had not been maintained in some time (albeit there is a fork) and the same for the Arc theme, development seems to have stalled there," said Jerry Bezencon in the release announcement. "Most of our approach to theming in Series 4.x follows the popular Flat design focus. We also now use the Openzone mouse theme."

Read more

Desktop Consolidation Gives SparkyLinux a Clearer Focus

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

You can run SparkyLinux from a thumb drive. You also can supercharge its performance by loading it into your computer's RAM.

However, the OS is not really as useful if you use it only for a portable computing platform. It performs best when installed on the hard drive. SparkyLinux does not use a frugal installation and special antics to provide persistent memory.

SparkyLinux is a very functional Linux OS. It is a solid choice for use as an all-purpose home edition with all the tools, codecs, plugins and drivers preinstalled.

Read more

How open source supports CERN's Large Hadron Collider

Filed under
Server
OSS

The 27-kilometre-long Large Hadron Collider (LHC) buried beneath the France-Switzerland border near Geneva is best known for helping to prove the existence of the Higgs' Boson particle - otherwise known as the God particle - crucial to the Standard Model of particle physics.

The LHC, which uses superconducting magnets to steer beams through its long pipes at just below the speed of light, is supported by open source IT systems at CERN to crunch through about 60 petabytes of data a year. These are built with Openstack, a free and open source software platform for building clouds.

The Openstack cloud first went into production at CERN in July 2013, marking the 13,000-physicist-strong laboratory as an early adopter. Today it has scaled to roughly 300,000 cores – and it's this kind of high-powered, scalable, open source cloud computing that got the attention of many private enterprises, now contributing to the code.

Read more

Also: Why You Should Do It Yourself

More in Tux Machines

Best Open Source Slack Alternatives for Team Communication

You are here: Home / List / Best Open Source Slack Alternatives for Team Communication Best Open Source Slack Alternatives for Team Communication Last updated February 25, 2020 By Ankush Das Leave a Comment Brief: Here, we shall take a look at the best open source slack alternatives that you can choose to communicate with your team at work. Slack is one of the most popular team communication services for work. Some may call it a glorified IRC but that doesn’t impact its popularity. It is available for free with additional features offered in its paid plans. Though Slack can be installed on Linux thanks to an Electron app but it is not open source, neither the client nor the server. In this article, I’ll list a few open source Slack alternatives that you can try. Read more

Dual-Boot GNU/Linux and Android

  • Planet Computers' clamshell phone can dual-boot Android and Linux

    Planet Computers' laptop-like Cosmo Communicator phone just became that much more useful to its audience of very particular power users. The Cosmo now supports a promised multi-boot function, letting you run Android (both regular and rooted), Debian Linux and TWRP on the same device without one replacing the other. You'll have to partition your storage and know your way around a boot menu, but this will give you a way to run Linux apps or otherwise experiment with your phone. You won't lose over-the-air updates for Android by installing Linux, Planet Computers said. The multi-boot firmware is available for free, and there are instructions for installing Debian and other software. This still isn't for the faint-hearted. However, it also represents one of the few instances where a phone maker has officially enabled support for operating systems besides the one that ships with the device. The Cosmo is also fairly well-suited to Linux thanks to its keyboard -- you won't have to jump through hoops to use the command line.

  • How can IT manage Android Things devices in the enterprise?

    Recent versions of Google's Android OS support a wider range of devices via the Android Things program's APIs and managing some of the newer devices can seem complicated at first. Thankfully, the underlying OS is essentially the same on all Android devices, so the EMM platform management and enrollment processes are usually similar for Android Things devices. The challenge for mobile admins is to develop a version of Android -- using the Android SDK and Android Things APIs -- that functions on these dedicated devices.

Update on Linux support: creation of a CERN Linux community forum

For those, a CERN Linux community forum has been created. Users will be able to post issues that they encounter when using non-CERN-supported Linux distributions and to post solutions. Users are also encouraged to post articles with comments and ideas that could help make this forum more dynamic and useful to them. Various methods for printing and using AFS, SSH, ROOT and other tools at CERN can be found on the internet. The CERN Linux community forum aims to collect these methods, as well as new ones that may be created directly in it. Read more

Python Programming

  • Introduction to Python SQL Libraries

    All software applications interact with data, most commonly through a database management system (DBMS). Some programming languages come with modules that you can use to interact with a DBMS, while others require the use of third-party packages. In this tutorial, you’ll explore the different Python SQL libraries that you can use. You’ll develop a straightforward application to interact with SQLite, MySQL, and PostgreSQL databases.

  • Introduction to Image Processing in Python with OpenCV

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how we can perform image processing using the Python language. We are not going to restrict ourselves to a single library or framework; however, there is one that we will be using the most frequently, the Open CV library. We will start off by talking a little about image processing and then we will move on to see different applications/scenarios where image processing can come in handy. So, let's begin!

  • Talking to API's and goodlooking tools

    One of my go-to locations for security news had a thread recently about a tool called VTScan. I really liked the idea of not having to go through the browser overhead to check files against multiple scan engines. Although the tool (which is itself a basic vt-cli spinoff) already existed, I was looking for a new challenge, I decided to roll my own and add a few cool features! I'll have a thorough look at how python talks to API's with requests and I look at turning all this API data into a nice GUI application with click. I hope to give you some idea's for CLI styling in the future so I can see more awesome tools by you all!

  • From a rejected Pycon talk to a new project.

    Like many others, my talk proposal (early draft here) for Pycon US was rejected. So, I decided to spend some time putting everything in a new project instead. (Documentation here.) It is still a rough draft, but usable ... and since I've mentioned it in a few other places, I thought I should mention it here as well.