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April 2018

Canonical Adds Multipass Cleanbuild Support to Its Snapcraft Snap Creator Tool

Filed under
Ubuntu

Snapcraft 2.42 comes less than two weeks after version 2.41, which improved the mechanism for overriding lifecycle steps, passthrough property, error reporting, and updated the dotnet, nodejs, and python plugins, to add even more enhancements to the utility that helps application developers to package their apps as Snaps.

In Snapcraft 2.42, there's a new feature called multipass cleanbuild support, which might come in handy to users of snapcraft cleanbuild with multipass installed. To try it out, you'll have to run the "$ SNAPCRAFT_BUILD_ENVIRONMENT=multipass snapcraft cleanbuild" command in the terminal emulator.

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MeX Linux OS Drops Linux Mint Base, It's Now Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

If previous versions of the MeX Linux distribution were based on Linux Mint, starting with build 180426, the operating system is now only based on packages from the Ubuntu and Debian GNU/Linux software repositories. The latest release is derived from the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series.

"Mex Linux is no longer based on Linux Mint," said Arne Exton. "MeX Build 180426 is based only on Debian and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support). I have replaced the original kernel with “my” special kernel 4.15.0-19-exton. All packages in MeX Linux have been upgraded to the latest version by 180426."

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Also: Voyager Linux 18.04 Released with Long Term Support, Based on Xubuntu 18.04 LTS

Radeon Software for Linux 18.10 Brings Vulkan 1.1, Ubuntu 16.04.4 / SLE 12 SP3 Support

System76 Releases Updated Pop!_OS Based Off Ubuntu 18.04

GNOME 3.28 in Fedora 28 and Flatpak's Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • Changes to Files in GNOME 3.28

    Here are some changes in GNOME 3.28 users will see in the Fedora 28 release.

  • Flatpak Linux Application Sandboxing & Distribution Framework Learns New Tricks

    Flatpak, the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, has been updated recently to version 0.11.4, a maintenance update that introduces numerous important changes.

    With Flatpak 0.11.4, the development team updated the "flatpak build" command to allow it to always use multi-arch support, as well as to mount app extensions during the build process. In addition, the "flatpak build-init" command now supports adding of extension points earlier than build-finish by using the --extension argument, and build-finish now supports the --remove-extension argument.

    Updates were also made to the "flatpak uninstall" command, which can now pick the user or system automatically if they're not specified, the "flatpak run" command, which received several new options like --no-a11y-bus and --no-documents-portal. Also, users can now use "flatpak remove" (without quotes) as an alias for the "flatpak uninstall" command.

Programming: GNU/Linux Development and Custom Android ROMs

Filed under
Android
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Create a Linux desktop application with Ruby

    Recently, while experimenting with GTK and its Ruby bindings, I decided to write a tutorial introducing this functionality. In this post, we will create a simple ToDo application (something like what we created with Ruby on Rails) using the gtk3 gem (a.k.a. the GTK+ Ruby bindings).

  • C# developer, Linux two of the fastest-growing search terms for Canadian tech job seekers

    A new report from Indeed Canada shows the fastest-growing search terms for tech job seekers in Canada.

  • The pain of installing custom ROMs on Android phones

    A while back I bought a Nexus 5x. During a three-day ordeal I finally got Omnirom installed - with full disk encryption, root access and some stitched together fake Google Play code that allowed me to run Signal without actually letting Google into my computer.

    A short while later, Open Whisper Systems released a version of Signal that uses Web Sockets when Google Play services is not installed (and allows for installation via a web page without the need for the Google Play store). Dang. Should have waited.

    Now, post Meltdown/Spectre, I worked up the courage to go through this process again. In the comments of my Omnirom post, I received a few suggestions about not really needing root. Hm - why didn't I think of that? Who needs root anyway? Combining root with full disk encryption was the real pain point in my previous install, so perhaps I can make things much easier. Also, not needing any of the fake Google software would be a definite plus.

    This time around I decided to go with LineageOS since it seems to be the most mainstream of the custom ROMs. I found perfectly reasonable sounding instructions.

Linux Mint Monthly News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Monthly News – April 2018

    Before anything else, let’s thank all the people who contribute to this project. Many people do, in very different ways. Special thanks to our donors to our “silent friend” from Germany for the coffee!

    Many thanks also to all the developers who interacted with us on Github lately. We’ve seen a lot of new faces and very cool contributions. A slack team was recently set up to improve communication between new developers and the development team.

  • Linux Mint Continues Work On Mint 19, LMDE 3

    The Linux Mint project has published their monthly recap of activities going on for April with this popular desktop Linux distribution.

    To little surprise, much of their time has been spent on setting up their re-base against Ubuntu Bionic (Ubuntu 18.04) for Linux Mint 19 and Debian Stretch for the upcoming LMDE3 (Linux Mint Debian Edition). As part of these upcoming OS releases, they have also been buttoning up the Cinnamon 3.8 desktop environment update.

USB 3.2 Work Is On The Way For The Linux 4.18 Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

USB 3.2 was announced last summer as an incremental update to the USB standard to double the bandwidth for existing USB Type-C cables.

We haven't seen much in the way of USB 3.2 mentions in the Linux kernel yet but then again we haven't really seen USB 3.2 devices yet. USB 3.2 brings a multi-lane operation mode for hosts and devices using existing Type-C cables as well as a minor update to the USB hub specification. USB 3.2 allows for new 10 Gbit/s and 20 Gbit/s rates using two lanes, USB 3.2 Gen 1x2 and USB 3.2 Gen 2x2, respectively.

It's looking like kernel developers are now working on getting their USB 3.2 Linux support in order. We were tipped off that as of last week there are some USB 3.2 patches queued in the usb-next tree maintained by Greg Kroah-Hartman's.

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Also: Linux 4.16.6 Brings Correct AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Temperature Monitoring

Games: EARTHLOCK, FOX n FORESTS and More

Filed under
Gaming

Tired of Windows and macOS? Try out elementary OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It’s interesting to change your default OS to try out something new sometimes, but then if you already have Windows 10 on your machine, I don’t see a strong argument to install elementary OS. Some might prefer it, but I think I will go back to Windows for now and check back with other solutions in the future. Please consider this as my own humble opinion. I recommend you to try out new solutions and find your own favorites. So, can elementary OS replace the big players? It could, but I suppose it’s mainly depending on the tools you (want to) use in your workflows.

If you mostly leverage software that’s exclusively available on Windows or macOS, it doesn’t really work out to swap between the systems, but if you can manage to shift it all towards Linux, you might survive the transition without too much pain points. If you’re mostly working within Google Chrome, you can also just install Chrome for Linux on elementary OS and run your work like that. In this particular case, you’ll feel almost no change, but then, you might as well opt for Remix OS or another type of Chrome OS.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Now Available To Download With 5Yrs Of Support

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor

  • NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor
    NVMM provides hardware-accelerated virtualization support for NetBSD. It is made of an ~MI frontend, to which MD backends can be plugged. A virtualization API is shipped via libnvmm, that allows to easily create and manage virtual machines via NVMM. Two additional components are shipped as demonstrators, toyvirt and smallkern: the former is a toy virtualizer, that executes in a VM the 64bit ELF binary given as argument, the latter is an example of such binary.
  • NetBSD Gains Hardware Accelerated Virtualization
    NetBSD, the highly portable Unix-like Open Source operating system known for its platform diversity, has gained hardware-accelerated virtualization support via an improved NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor (NVMM).

GNU Releases: mailutils, cflow, tar and parallel

Devices: AArch64, Siemens/Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL), Raspberry Pi and Xiaomi

  • We need Arm64 systems for developers. Again.
    Getting AArch64 hardware for developers is important. When it happen? One day. Maybe even before people forget that such architecture existed. We talk about it during each Linaro Connect. So far nothing serious came from it. We had some failed attempts like Cello or Husky. There is Synquacer with own set of issues. Some people use MACCHIATObin. Some still use Applied Micro Mustangs which should get a place in computer museums. It is chicken and egg issue. No one makes affordable AArch64 systems because no one buys them. Because no one makes them. Hardware vendors concentrate on server market — no chips to choose for developer systems.
  • Siemens PLM Software announces enterprise Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) solution
    Siemens PLM Software announced an enterprise Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) solution that provides electronics manufacturers secure, scalable and configurable distributions for industrial, medical, aerospace and defense applications. This MEL technology is a configurable distribution that provides an operating system platform for embedded systems development and is a result of the continued integration of the recently acquired embedded systems design capabilities from Mentor Graphics. The solution is based on Debian, an enterprise class, open source Linux operating system.
  • Siemens launches new enterprise class embedded Linux solution for embedded systems development
    With the growth of internet of things (IoT) and other smart devices, it is becoming increasingly complex and expensive for manufacturers to develop embedded distributions and applications for these devices based on the Linux® operating system. Siemens PLM Software today announced a new enterprise Mentor® Embedded Linux® (MEL) solution that provides electronics manufacturers secure, scalable and configurable distributions for industrial, medical, aerospace and defense applications. This new MEL technology is a configurable distribution that provides a robust operating system platform for embedded systems development and is a result of the continued integration of the recently acquired embedded systems design capabilities from Mentor Graphics. The solution is based on Debian, a broadly utilized, enterprise class, open source Linux operating system.
  • Raspberry Pi Begins Rolling Out The Linux 4.19 Kernel
    The Raspberry Pi folks have been working the past few months on upgrading their kernel in moving from Linux 4.14 to 4.19. That roll-out has now begun. Linux 4.19 has been the target of the Raspberry Pi Foundation due to this newer kernel being a Long-Term Support (LTS) release and thus will be maintained for the long-term. That large jump in the standard kernel version for Raspberry Pi ultimately means less work too for the developers involved: between 4.14 and 4,19, a lot of Raspberry Pi patches and other Broadcom improvements were upstreamed.
  • Raspberry Pi Updates Devices to Linux 4.19
  • Xiaomi’s 2019 goal is to release kernel source code more quickly for all its devices
    Just before MWC 2019, Xiaomi took to the stage at an event in China to launch the new Xiaomi Mi 9 and Mi 9 SE. Both the devices represent the best of what OEM has to offer, bringing in a high value device at a fraction of the cost of a premium flagship. While this approach lets them appeal to the average consumer, Xiaomi has also been quite developer-friendly, which makes them a good purchase even for those who are looking for a device with a very good third party development community. Xiaomi does not void the warranty of devices (in India at least) if you unlock the bootloader, and they have worked on significantly bringing down the waiting times for bootloader unlock requests too.