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March 2018

More Windows Server vs. Linux Benchmark Tests With Spectre/Meltdown Mitigations

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I posted an article looking at the Relative Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation Costs On Windows vs. Linux. Today from a different system and using Windows Server 2016 rather than Windows 10 are some fresh benchmarks doing a similar comparison with different hardware and also looking at the Spectre and Meltdown mitigation performance impact again on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Clear Linux.

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Red Hat looks beyond Linux

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

The Red Hat Linux distribution is turning 25 years old this week. What started as one of the earliest Linux distributions is now the most successful open-source company, and its success was a catalyst for others to follow its model. Today’s open-source world is very different from those heady days in the mid-1990s when Linux looked to be challenging Microsoft’s dominance on the desktop, but Red Hat is still going strong.

To put all of this into perspective, I sat down with the company’s current CEO (and former Delta Air Lines COO) Jim Whitehurst to talk about the past, present and future of the company, and open-source software in general. Whitehurst took the Red Hat CEO position 10 years ago, so while he wasn’t there in the earliest days, he definitely witnessed the evolution of open source in the enterprise, which is now more widespread than every.

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Stable kernels 4.15.15, 4.14.32, 4.9.92 and 4.4.126

Filed under
Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • “Top Notch” Android Phones Are Utterly Stupid And I Feel Sorry For Them

    I’m not going to dive deep and rant about all the “courageous” paths taken by Apple that I didn’t like. I’m not going to discuss why Apple ditched the 3.5mm headphone jack or why it chose to push proprietary connectors and standards. However, since this article is all about notches and Android device manufacturers are hellbent on copying Apple, changes brought in iPhone X can’t be ignored.

  • Days of Future_Open
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #31 – Reviewing Kubernetes 1.10

    Like clockwork, a new release of Kubernetes comes out every quarter. And with the arrival of Spring comes Kubernetes 1.10. Stability, Security, Networking and Storage are front of center of the new release. This week we dig into the 1.10 release and highlight some of the features that we believe will have the biggest impact on customers being able to deploy more applications on Kubernetes (and ultimately OpenShift).

  • Qubes Version 4.0 Released, Purism Laptops Shipping Quickly, New Rust Version 1.25.0 and More

    Purism announces that its Librem laptop orders are now shipping within a week—in other words, on average, the company now can fulfill orders within five business days. See the Purism blog for more information on this milestone.

  • GDC 2018 Videos Now Available, Including Khronos/Vulkan Talks

    If you are looking for some deep technical content to watch this weekend, the video recordings from this month's Game Developers Conference 2018 (GDC 18) are now available.

  • The ways of the GNOME people

    Hidden away in the farthest corner of the planet, its slopes covered in mist and darkness and its peaks lost in the clouds, stands the formidable Mount GNOME. Perched atop the mountain is a castle as menacing as the mountain itself – its towering walls made of stones as cold as death, and the wind howling through the courtyard like a dozen witches screaming for blood.

    Living inside the imposing blackness are a group of feral savages, of whom very little is known to the world outside. The deathly walls of the castle bear testimony to their skull-crushing barbarism, and their vile customs have laid waste to the surrounding slopes and valleys. Mortally fearful of invoking their mad wrath, no human traveller has dared to come near the vicinity of their territory. Shrouded in anonymity, they draw their name from the impregnable mountain that they inhabit – they are the GNOME people.

  • Leak Hunting and Mutter Hacking

    Last week, when I upgraded to GNOME 3.28, I was sad to notice an extremely annoying bug in Mutter/GNOME Shell: every once in a while, a micro-stuttering happened. This was in additions to another bug that was disappointing me for quite a while: the tiling/maximize/unmaximize animations were not working on Wayland too.

  • openSUSE Elections Postponed

    The elections for the openSUSE Board have been postponed until April 15.

    The postponement will extend Phase 1 of the elections and give candidates more time to campaign and engage with the community. The voting phase (Phase 2) will start April 15.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Best Content Management System

    Unless you've been living under a rock, you most certainly have heard of WordPress, one of the most popular blogging platforms around that also happens to be 100% open source. WordPress powers 27% of the web from personal to corporate to even government sites (Whitehouse.gov for one).

    In a 2008 interview, Linux Journal's Katherine Druckman asked WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg, "You frequently have reiterated your commitment to open-source ideals and GPL licensing. How has this commitment factored into the development of your company, Automattic? How do you use open-source technology to achieve your goals?"

  • Chime in: Which features could Microsoft 'steal' from Linux?
  • Dumping your USB

     

    One of the many new features of OpenBSD 6.3 is the possibility to dump USB traffic to userland via bpf(4). This can be done with tcpdump(8) by specifying a USB bus as interface:

  • LG re-open sources WebOS, a look at the AI behind the Pixel 2's camera, and more news
  • 6 differences between agile and traditional planning

    Traditional and agile planning methods both focus on developing strategies to lead teams to succeed in today's competitive landscape; however, their approaches are quite distinct. If you're transitioning from traditional to agile planning, it's important to understand their substantially different mindsets and leadership styles.

  • Product Review: GitStorage

    By profession, I'm a software developer. Aside from a preferred editor, what matters most to a developer is the use of a Source Code Manager (SCM). So, when a new product comes along featuring my favorite SCM, Git, I had no choice but to spend some time using it.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: CloudMapper, an AWS Visualization Tool

    When working with AWS, it's common to have a number of separate accounts run by different teams for different projects. Gaining an understanding of how those accounts are configured is best accomplished by visually displaying the resources of the account and how these resources can communicate. This complements a traditional asset inventory.

    Duo built CloudMapper to generate interactive network diagrams of AWS accounts and released it as open source on Github.

Carnegie Mellon University's 'Open-Source' 3-D Bioprinter

Filed under
Hardware
  • Could this $500 open-source printer be the RepRap of 3D bioprinters?

    Researchers from Adam Feinberg’s lab at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an open-source 3D bioprinter that can be built affordably using a modified desktop 3D printer. The large-volume extruder (LVE) component of the bioprinter can be 3D printed.

  • Carnegie Mellon University researchers publish designs for open-source 3D bioprinter

    Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an open-source, low-cost 3D bioprinter. They have published a paper in HardwareX with the complete instructions for the installation of a syringe-based large volume extruder (LVE) on a desktop FDM 3D printer.

    The LVE allows users to print artificial human tissues at a high resolution and scale. It is designed to print a range of materials, including biopolymers, hydrogels, pastes and epoxies.

    Adam Feinberg, one of the authors of the paper and a Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor at Carnegie Mellon, said “The LVE 3D bioprinter allows us to print much larger tissue scaffolds, at the scale of an entire human heart, with high quality.”

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE: QupZilla/Falkon and KDE Connect Development

Filed under
KDE
  • Yahoo hit QupZilla.

    As most you already know as an XFCE environment installation comes with QupZilla web browser.
    The QupZilla web browser is a lightweight multiplatform web browser written in Qt Framework and using its web rendering engine QtWebEngine.
    If you using Fedora 28 the you can get the Falkon web browser.
    The wikipedia tell us about Falkon browser "(formerly QupZilla[3]) is a free and open-source web browser, intended for general users. Falkon is licensed under GPLv3."
    The Falkon browser working well with Yahoo.

  • Building KDE Connect

    After I shared the link to the KDE Connect Development Telegram group almost 20 people joined within 24 hours. I certainly did not expect such a interest in KDE Connect. When I joined the project about a year ago the hardest part for me was setting up a proper development workflow, meaning configuring, building, installing and debugging the application and interacting with git and Phabricator. To ease your start in KDE Connect development I would like to give you the guide I wish I had back then.

    I will show you how to fetch the project, build, run and debug it using KDevelop. It’s an IDE by the KDE Community designed with KDE projects in mind. In theory you can use any IDE you like, if you figure out how to configure it properly.

  • KDE Connect – New stuff I

    In my first post about KDE Connect I told you about the album cover art on Android. Thanks to Matthijs it now also works when the cover art is a local file, for example when you are using VLC. It already worked when the cover art was a remote URL, for example with Spotify. The cover art is now also shown in the media control notification and added to the Android media session.

More in Tux Machines

Running Deep Learning Models On Intel Hardware? It's Time To Consider A Different OS

Firstly, Intel has done extensive work to make the Xeon family of processors highly optimized for AI. The Intel Xeon Scalable processors outsmart GPUs in accelerating the training on large datasets. Intel is telling its customers that they don’t need expensive GPUs until they meet a threshold. Most of the deep learning training can be effectively done on CPUs that cost a fraction of their GPU counterparts. Beyond the marketing messages and claims, Intel went onto prove that their deep learning stack performs better than NVIDIA GPU-based stack. Recently, Intel published a benchmark to show its leadership in deep learning. Intel Xeon Scalable processers trained a deep learning network with 7878 images per second on ResNet-50 outperforming 7844 images per second on NVIDIA Tesla V100. Intel’s performance optimization doesn’t come just from its CPUs. It is delivered by a purpose-built software stack that is highly optimized at various levels. From the operating system to the TensorFlow framework, Intel has tweaked multiple layers of software to deliver unmatched performance. To ease the process of running this end-to-end stack, Intel has turned to one of its open source projects called Clear Linux OS. Clear Linux project was started as a purpose-built, container-optimized, and lightweight operating system. It was started with the premise that the OS running a container doesn’t need to perform all the functions of a traditional OS. Container Linux, the OS developed by CoreOS (now a part of Red Hat) followed the same philosophy. Within a short span, Clear Linux gained popularity among open source developers. Intel kept improving the OS, making it relevant to run modern workloads such as machine learning training jobs, AI inferencing, analytics and edge computing. Read more Also: Intel Core i9 9900KS Allowing 5.0GHz All-Core, Icelake News Coming This Week

Games: Pathfinder: Kingmaker, MidBoss, CorsixTH, Railway Empire and Unbound: Worlds Apart

  • The RPG 'Pathfinder: Kingmaker' is getting a free Enhanced Edition update next month + new DLC
    Pathfinder: Kingmaker, the party-based RPG from Owlcat Games and Deep Silver is going to expand with a free Enhanced Edition and another DLC. They say it's going to include plenty of "gameplay-enriching content additions" along with the usual quality of life improvements to existing features, new abilities and ways to build your character, a new Slayer class, new items and weapons, improved balance especially in the beginning and last two chapters, an improved kingdom management system, an increased variety to the random encounters on the map and so on.
  • MidBoss, the unique body-snatching roguelike turns 2 with a big sale and future plans details
    MidBoss is a game we've covered here numerous times, mainly due to how unique it is. You take down enemies, take their body and it's pretty amusing. The developer, Kitsune Games, has supported Linux rather nicely and now that MidBoss is over two years old they've decided to put it on a big sale. Not just that, they've also announced a fancy sounding DLC that's coming along with a free update for everyone. The DLC will have brand new pixel-art for all of the monsters, which will include idle animations for them too so the DLC should make the game look a lot more interesting. Also being added in the DLC is a "randomizer mode", to make repeated runs in the game vastly different.
  • FOSS game engine 'CorsixTH' for Theme Hospital update 0.63 is out
    The first major release for the FOSS game engine in some time, CorsixTH 0.63 is out following the recent release candidate build. CorsixTH might not be "finished" but it's incredibly playable and does provide a better experience (mostly) over running the original Theme Hospital.
  • Railway Empire has another update and it's off to France in the latest DLC out now
    There appears to be no stopping this train, Railway Empire continues to see plenty of post-release support and extra optional content. Firstly, the latest "Community Update" is out taking feedback from (you guessed it) the community of players. They've introduced modding support to DLC scenarios, increased the total number of trains and stations you can have, new tooltips, you can skip the current music track using the new "P" hotkey, the train list will actually show problems employees have, new train list filtering options, train speed reduced if they're missing supplies and lots of other nice quality of life updates.
  • A Linux version of the mind-bending multi-dimensional 'Unbound: Worlds Apart' will come at release
    Unbound: Worlds Apart from Alien Pixel Studios is currently crowdfunding on Kickstarter, this hand-crafted puzzler looks like it could melt my mind with the portal system.

Linux 5.2-rc2

Hey, what's to say? Fairly normal rc2, no real highlights - I think most of the diff is the SPDX updates. Who am I kidding? The highlight of the week was clearly Finland winning the ice hockey world championships. So once you sober up from the celebration, go test, Linus Read more Also: Linux 5.2-rc2 Kernel Released As The "Golden Lions"

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, Linux Gaming News Punch, Open Source Security Podcast and GNU World Order