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January 2018

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 80 - GPS tracking and jamming
  • How to add a repository on your Linux machine
  • Modify SVG using GSVGtk: First Repor

    GSVGtk is a library to provide GTK+ widgets you can use to access SVG files. It is powered by GSVG, in a way it can access each shape and its properties using a GObject API based on W3C SVG 1.1 specification.

    Currently, GSVGtk uses Clutter to encapsulate SVG shapes, render them inside Clutter Actors, through librsvg, and maps events to source SVG in order to eventually modify original definitions, like its position.

    In the following video, you can see GSVGtk’s Container based on Clutter, loading an SVG file, take some shapes from it to show on the scene.

  • logo.png for default avatar for GitLab repos

    I added a logo.png to GNOME Tweaks at GNOME and it automatically showed up in Salsa when I imported the new version.

  • What’s New in Peppermint OS 8 Respin

    Peppermint OS 8 respin is the latest release of Peppermint OS Linux Distribution. This release based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), powered by linux kernel 4.10 series, using LXDE desktop environment with new “Pepirus” xfwm4, GTK+ and icon themes. Also, brings 64 bit and 32 bit installation images. The 64 bit release provides complete support for UEFI systems and secure boot.

  • Imagine the world's biggest Kanban / Scrumboard

    Imagine a Kanban board that could aggregate issues from multiple backends, including your CalDAV task list, Bugzilla systems (Fedora, Mozilla, GNOME communities), Github issue lists and the Debian Bug Tracking System, visualize them together and coordinate your upstream fixes and packaging fixes in a single sprint.

    [...]

    If you'd like to see this or any of the other proposed projects go ahead, you don't need to be a Debian Developer to suggest ideas, refer a student or be a co-mentor. Many of our projects have relevance in multiple communities. Feel free to get in touch with us through the debian-outreach mailing list.

The Linux Foundation is Growing

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Foundation fights fragmentation with network umbrella

    Open source platforms are becoming more and more fundamental to the new telecoms network architecture, raising exciting prospects for a more democratic ecosystem and rapid innovation. But open source also comes with the risk of fragmentation, which has already been seen in industry splits over different approaches to management and orchestration (MANO) in virtualized networks. A large number of open projects has emerged in the areas of virtualization, software-defined networking (SDN), MANO and even telecoms hardware initiatives like Facebook’s OpenCellular.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces 30 New Silver Members

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 30 Silver members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the greatest shared technology resources in history, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Server: Microservices, Replika, STORK, OpenStack

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • India's RJio Plots Open Source Disruption

    Owned by Indian billionaire Mukesh Ambani, the telco believes that it is high time India developed products and services tailored specifically to the Indian market. "If you observe, a lot of effort has been put into the IT space [in India], but what has not happened is a focused effort [for innovation] in the telecom space," says Matthew Oommen, RJio's president of networks, global strategy and service development, on the sidelines of India's recent Digital Open Summit.

  • Open Source Initiative Turns 20

    The Open Source Initiative (OSI) will celebrate its 20th anniversary on Friday, Feb. 2, and the global non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness and adoption of open source software is gonna par-tay. By which I mean, the OSI has scheduled activities around the world this year to commemorate the event. (I'm hoping there will be snacks.)

  • Swatantra17

    Last month Thiruvananthapuram witnessed one of the biggest Free and Open Source Software conference called Swatantra17. Swatantra is a flagship triennial ( actually used to be triennial, but from now on organizers decided to conduct in every 2 years.) FOSS conference from ICFOSS. This year there were more than 30 speakers from all around the world. The event held from 20-21 December at Mascot hotel, Thiruvananthapuram. I was one of the community volunteer for the event and was excited from the day it announced Smile .

  • DO or UNDO - there is no VACUUM

    To put this another way, it is in general true that PostgreSQL’s VACUUM implementation has gotten progressively better at reclaiming space occupied by dead tuples more quickly and with less expenditure of effort. And that’s really good, because the faster you reclaim space, the less new space you end up allocating, which keeps tables small and performance high. However, the examples above show that VACUUM isn’t the whole problem. In these examples, even if VACUUM ran at the earliest instant when it could reclaim the space occupied by dead tuples and ran infinitely fast, the table would still become bloated. In the case where the bloat is caused by many short queries run while one long-running transaction remains open, we could, with smarter snapshot management, limit the worst-case bloat to approximately a factor of two -- that is, we’d keep the version of the tuple visible to the old snapshot and the current version, and discard the intermediate versions, a trick PostgreSQL currently can’t manage. However, even a factor of two is a lot, and what if there are multiple distinct open snapshots?  Further, in the case where the bloat is created by a SQL statement that induces scattered updates throughout the table, no improvement to VACUUM can possibly help. By the time that SQL statement finishes, the damage is already done.

  • Scratch group projects – 2018

    Once again, it’s time for this year’s Scratch projects from my grade 10 students. Up next is python, but their final projects are available at https://scratch.lesbg.com. Feel free to play them and rate them. This is a first attempt for students, so do please be gentle on the ratings.

  • Why Create a New Unix Shell?

FSF and GNU Debugger (GDB) 8.1

Filed under
GNU
  • Free Software Foundation was gifted 91 bitcoin

    The Free Software Foundation, has announced that it received its largest donation ever, 91.45 bitcoin from an anonymous entity called Pineapple Fund. The 91.45 bitcoin, at the time of payment, was roughly equal to $1 million. The Free Software Foundation is an organisation that promotes the concept of free software, which is defined by the ‘four essential freedoms’.

  • GDB 8.1 released!

    Release 8.1 of GDB, the GNU Debugger, is now available via anonymous FTP.  GDB is a source-level debugger for Ada, C, C++, Objective-C, Pascal and many other languages.  GDB can target (i.e., debug programs running on) more than a dozen different processor architectures, and GDB itself can run on most popular GNU/Linux, Unix and Microsoft Windows variants.

  • GDB 8.1 Debugger Brings Better Rust Support, Improved Python Scripting

    Version 8.1 of the GNU Debugger (GDB) is now available for developers.

    The GDB 8.1 debugger update brings Python scripting enhancements, improved Rust language support, breakpoints on C++ functions are now set on all scopes by default, a number of new commands have been added, the GDBserver has received a few enhancements, there is better auto-completion support for this debugger, and a variety of other improvements to help developers debug their code in a variety of languages.

  • GDB 8.1 released

    Version 8.1 of the GDB debugger is out. Changes include better support for the Rust language and various other improvements to make debugging easier; see the announcement and the news file for the full list.

Security: Updates, Google, Hacking Team, Microsoft-NSA, Django

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • How Did Google Wipe Out 700,000 Malicious Android Apps From Play Store? Using Artificial Intelligence
  • Hacking Team Is Still Alive Thanks to a Mysterious Investor From Saudi Arabia

    The 2015 breach of spyware vendor Hacking Team seemed like it should have ended the company. Hacking Team was thoroughly owned, with its once-secret list of customers, internal emails, and spyware source code leaked online for anyone to see. But nearly three years later, the company trudges on, in large part thanks to a cash influx in 2016 from a mysterious investor who had been publicly unknown until now.

    The hack hurt the company’s reputation and bottom line: Hacking Team lost customers, was struggling to make new ones, and several key employees left. Three years later—after the appearance of this new investor—the company appears to have stopped the bleeding. The company registered around $1 million in losses in 2015, but bounced back with around $600,000 in profits in 2016.

    Motherboard has learned that this apparent recovery is in part thanks to the new investor, who appears to be from Saudi Arabia—and whose lawyer’s name matches that of a prominent Saudi attorney who regularly works for the Saudi Arabian government and facilitates deals between the government and international companies.

  • NSA exploit EternalBlue is back and powering WannaMine cryptojacking malware

    SAY HELLO to WannaMine, the cryptojacking malware that's using leaked NSA hacking tools to infiltrate computers and syphon processor power to crunch calculations needed to 'mine; cryptocurrencies.

    But first a history lesson. You may remember the EternalBlue, a Windows exploit developed by the NSA that was leaked by hacking group Shadow Brokers.

    Pretty soon after the exploit was used to launch the massive WannaCry ransomware attack that locked down NHS systems and affected some 230,000 computers across 150 countries. EternalBlue was then used to spearhead the arguably more dangerous NotPetya attacks.

  • Johnny Hacker hauls out NSA-crafted Server Message Block exploits, revamps 'em

    EternalBlue, EternalSynergy, EternalRomance and EternalChampion formed part of the arsenal of NSA-developed hacking tools that were leaked by the Shadow Brokers group before they were used (in part) to mount the devastating NotPetya cyber attack.

    [...]

    "After that, the exploit module will drop to disk (or use a PowerShell command), explains zerosum0x0, and then copy directly to the hard drive."

  • 10 tips for making the Django Admin more secure

    Offloading the responsibility for making your app secure onto QA testers or an information security office is tempting, but security is everyone's responsibility. The Django Admin is one of our favorite features of Django, but unless it's locked down correctly, it presents opportunities for exploitation. To save your users from compromised data, here are 10 tips to make the Django Admin more secure.

11 Myths About the RISC-V ISA

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Despite its rich ecosystem and growing number of real-world implementations, misconceptions about RISC-V are keeping companies around the world from fully realizing its benefits.

Read more

Mozilla: Rust, Privacy and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Where’s Rust headed in 2018? Ask the community.

    2017 was a big year for the Rust systems programming language. Now, members of the open source project are looking to consolidate last year’s progress – making Rust easier to learn and use – and publish the first major update to the stable 2015 Rust release.

    “We’re making Rust a much nicer place to be,” said Aaron Turon, a Rust core team member and engineering manager at Mozilla. “We’re working to create a more productive environment for programmers – especially those new to the language.”

  • The 2018 Rust Event Lineup

    Every year there are multiple Rust events around the world, bringing together the community. Despite being early in the year, we’re excited to be able to highlight several events that are already being organized!

  • This Week in Rust 219

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Retrospective: Looking Glass

    In December, we launched a tv show tie-in with Mr. Robot, Looking Glass, that alarmed some people because we didn’t think hard enough about the implications of shipping an add on that had the potential to be both confusing and upsetting. We’re deeply sorry for this and we understand why it’s important for us to learn and grow from this experience. As mentioned last month, we conducted a post-mortem to better understand how and why this happened and how we can do better.

  • Mozilla Reps Community: Rep of the Month – December 2017
  • Mozilla Security Blog: Preventing data leaks by stripping path information in HTTP Referrers

    To help prevent third party data leakage while browsing privately, Firefox Private Browsing Mode will remove path information from referrers sent to third parties starting in Firefox 59.

More in Tux Machines

SSH Key Rotation with the POSIX Shell - Sunset Nears for Elderly Keys

OpenBSD has recently stressed to us the value of key rotation by their use of “Signify” distribution release signatures. We have realized that SSH keys should also rotate, to reduce the risk of powerful keys that fall into the wrong hands which become “the gift that keeps on giving.” There have always been open questions on the retirement of SSH keys. These questions have grown in volume and many are joining the advocacy for SSH certificate authorities. To “rotate” an SSH key is to replace it, in such a way that it is no longer recognized, requiring removal from the authorized_keys file. SSH rotation is commonly addressed with Ansible, but this leaves many users on smaller systems or lacking privilege without recourse. A more basic and accessible method to migrate SSH keys is sorely lacking. Below is presented an SSH key rotation script written in nothing more than the POSIX shell. There is palpable danger in the misuse of such a tool. Many administrators control inaccessible systems that entail massive inconvenience in a loss of control. Demonstrated here are rotation schemes of increasing risk, for any holder of a key to choose, to their own tolerance. Hopefully, I have not made grave mistakes in the design. The most conservative users of this approach should tread with extreme caution, test carefully, and ensure alternate means of access prior to any deployment. As the author, I have no desire to assume any responsibility for a failed rotation, and its consequences. I especially disavow the “wipe” option below to remove entries from authorized_keys. It is presented as commentary, not working code. In any case, we foolishly rush in where the more prudent fear to tread. Read more

Amazon Linux 2022 Performs Well, But Intel's Clear Linux Continues Leading In The Cloud

AWS recently introduced Amazon Linux 2022 in preview form as the latest iteration of their Linux distribution now based on Fedora with various alterations to catering to their customers running it on EC2. Last week were benchmarks looking at Amazon Linux 2022 compared to Amazon Linux 2 and other distributions like CentOS and Ubuntu. In this article we are seeing how Amazon Linux 2022 can compete with Intel's own Clear Linux performance-optimized distribution. Read more

Games: Pokémon, Roundup, and Some More Titles on GNU/Linux

  • Bridging Game Worlds With The ‘Impossible’ Pokémon Trade | Hackaday

    Transferring hard-earned Pokémon out of the second generation GameBoy game worlds into the ‘Advance Era’ cartridges (and vice versa) has never been officially supported by Nintendo, however [Goppier] has made these illicit trades slightly easier for budding Pokémon trainers by way of a custom PCB and a healthy dose of reverse engineering. Changes to the data structure between Generation II on the original GameBoy (Pokémon Gold, Silver and Crystal) and Generation III on the GameBoy Advance (Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, FireRed, LeafGreen and Emerald) meant that trades between these cartridges was never a possibility – at least not through any legitimate means. In contrast, Pokémon trades are possible between the first and second generation games, as well as from Generation III and beyond, leaving the leap from Gen II to Gen III as an obvious missing link.

  • Punk Wars, Axis & Allies 1942 Online, Melvor Idle, Unpacking … - itsfoss.net

    One more to liven up the December bridge, and that is that there is nothing more entertaining to pass the time than to play a game and that is partly Linux Play, our premiere native games section for Linux with this, its monthly edition with the best that came out in November. Including construction and survival title and Punk wars, the classic war strategy of Axis & Allies 1942 Online, the RPG hardcore Melvor idle… And a lot more, without forgetting the free title with which we close the list and that this time transfers the television phenomenon of The Squid Game to PC controls under the name of Crab Game. Linux Play!

  • NeuroNet: Mendax Proxy gets some first footage, mixing elements of Your Grace & Reigns | GamingOnLinux

    NeuroNet: Mendax Proxy is an upcoming adventure that the developer claims blends together elements found in the likes of Your Grace, Reigns and Astrologaster into something new. Set to launch in 2022, NeuroNet sees you take control of an AI charged with managing a city called Catena. You will need to make quick-fire decisions that impact the future and the prosperity of its citizens, with every choice and decision taken having a lasting effect on those you meet and the city's status. Lots of cyberpunk theming going on here with a new trailer giving a look into what to expect you can see below.

  • The Jackie and Daria update for Spiritfarer lands December 13 | GamingOnLinux

    The biggest update yet for the award-winning Spiritfarer lands on December 13, with plenty of new content. Spiritfarer is a casual thoughtful experience about being a ferrymaster for the deceased. You build up a boat, explore and care for various spirits before letting them go. With the new update coming the developer said it is the biggest yet with a new island to explore, there's two new spirits to make friends with and a hospital to bring back from the brink. On top of that there's also some sort of new platforming event and new upgrades for your ferry.

GNU/Linux on Desktop/Laptop Miscellany

  • What Is a Physical Kill Switch, and Does Your PC Need One?

    Purism is a company founded on the idea of having strict privacy and security features built into its computers. The Librem 14 is a prime example of this philosophy, and its hardware, firmware, and operating system have been designed with a significantly higher level of paranoia than typical computers. The Librem 14 Linux laptop features multiple physical kill switches, which the company claims absolutely disables the related hardware. There are switches for the webcam and microphone as well as WiFi and Bluetooth. When it comes to the Librem 14 in particular, there are so many additional privacy features that the kill switches really are the least of it, but there are examples of such kill switches in regular laptops that don’t go to such extremes. All the way back in 2018, HP was already shipping laptops with physical kill switches for the webcam. Their Specter laptops included these switches, so hopefully the chances of a hacked webcam recording you when you don’t want it to are virtually zero. Kill switches may not always take the form of a traditional sliding switch on the side of a laptop. It’s entirely possible to integrate the kill switch with a physical, built-in camera shutter.

  • Partaker Intel Core i3-8130U fanless mini PC Win 10 Linux supported $423

    Partaker have created a new fanless mini PC equipped with a wealth of connectivity and capable of supporting both the Microsoft Windows 10 and operating system most Linux distributions depending on your preference. Pricing starts from $423 for the Intel Core i3-8130U processor version although a more affordable Intel Celeron 3865u/3867u/3965u processor version is also available with prices starting from $246. Both are barebone systems meaning that you will need to provide your own memory, storage and operating system, enabling you to tailor the system to your exact requirements.

  • IGEL Releases Support for VMware Workspace ONE Intelligent Hub for Linux