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October 2017

Wine 2.20

Filed under
Software

OpenIndiana Hipster 2017.10 Released with Latest X.Org Server, MATE 1.18 Desktop

Filed under
OS

The latest release, OpenIndiana Hipster 2017.10 arrived today with numerous changes and up-to-date components, including the latest X.Org Server 1.19.5 display server and corresponding libraries and drivers, ABI compatibility for using Solaris 10u10 binaries, as well as updated cluster suite and text installer.

"Text installer now can perform basic OpenIndiana installation to existing ZFS pool," reads today's announcement. "The option is considered advanced and should be used with care, but allows you to install minimal OI system to existing pool. To use it, press F5 on 'Welcome' screen."

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DebEX Barebone Linux Returns to LXDE, Now Based on Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster"

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Debian

Powered by the Linux 4.13 kernel series and based on the Debian Testing (upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster") and Debian Sid repositories, DebEX Barebone LXDE Build 171030 replaces the LXQt desktop environment that was used in previous versions with LXDE, probably to make the ISO smaller and the OS a bit faster.

"The ISO has decreased from 1860 MB to 1330 MB, which makes it easier to run the system live from RAM," said Arne Exton in the release announcement. "That ability allows DebEX LXDE to be very fast, since reading and writing data from/to RAM is much faster than on a hard disk drive."

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Solus 4 Linux OS to Bring Back Wayland Support, MATE Edition Will Get Some Love

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OS

First off, it looks like the Solus devs plan to re-implement support for the next-generation Wayland display server in their GNU/Linux distribution, though the ISO images will come with the 2D X.Org graphics driver enabled by default and use open source drivers for Nvidia GPUs as they want to further improve Nvidia Optimus.

"We're working to improve the NVIDIA situation and investigating a switch to libglvnd, enabling of wayland-egl/eglstreams, etc.," reads today's announcement. "We've moved back to open drivers to allow Ikey to further research NVIDIA Optimus. [...] We have no timeline on this but we're actively looking into it!"

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AMDGPU+RadeonSI Is Much Faster Than The Old Proprietary Fglrx Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With going back to test Ubuntu 14.04 through Ubuntu 17.10's Radeon OpenGL performance as part of marking AMD's open-source strategy turning a decade old, I also took this opportunity while having an old Ubuntu installation running to also re-test the former Catalyst/fglrx driver stack that's since been succeeded by AMDGPU-PRO and AMDGPU+RadeonSI.

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RPi Zero W clone offers quad-core power for $15

Filed under
Android
Linux

SinoVoip’s Linux-friendly, 60 x 30mm Banana Pi M2 Zero (BPI-M2 Zero) SBC closely mimics the Raspberry Pi Zero W, but has a faster Allwinner H2+.

Just as we were trumpeting the $23 BPI-M2 Magic as being the “smallest, cheapest Banana Pi yet,” SinoVoip has launched an even tinier and more affordable Linux/Android hacker board on AliExpress. The WiFi-enabled Banana Pi M2 Zero (BPI-M2 Zero), which was revealed back in July, is now selling for only $15 with the standard 512MB RAM, or $21.53 including shipping to the U.S.

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Games: Doom 3, Parkitect, Sphinx, Cursed Mummy,ATOM RPG, Darkest Dungeon, Intrinsic

Filed under
Gaming
  • Playing Doom 3 on Linux in 2017

    When I first started using Linux full time in 2007 gaming on the platform was dominated by id Software. Thanks to a flexible policy regarding unsupported binaries and a corporate culture open to experimentation, something which was lost not long after the Zenimax acquisition, Linux users were graced with both native closed source binaries for their latest games and a treasure trove of source ports for many of their older titles.

    Coming as it did only a few years after the fall of Loki Software and the dark age that followed it, Linux gaming received a major boost in 2004 with the release of Doom 3. Not only did it add one more title to the then nascent Linux gaming library, it was also one of the most anticipated games of the year and remained a graphical powerhouse for many years after.

    Not only were Linux users able to play the game on their systems mere months after the release of the commercial Windows version, they could play it with no loss of graphical fidelity. At a time when Linux was dismissed even more than it is today as just being a software toy or something only meant for servers, being able to play Doom 3 was a significant achievement which helped pave the way for the Linux gaming scene as we know it today.

  • Parkitect alpha 19 is out with new rides, new scenario options and plenty more
  • THQ Nordic is bringing Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy to Linux

    Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy, a game originally released back in 2003 is being revamped by THQ Nordic and it will include a Linux release.

  • The Fallout-inspired 'ATOM RPG' will launch on into Early Access next month with Linux support

    ATOM RPG [Steam, Official Site] is a Fallout-inspired post-apocalypse that was funded by Kickstarter and it's heading to Early Access next month. The plan is to release it on November 28th, with their current plan to remain in Early Access for five or six months.

  • Darkest Dungeon gets new character class in DLC
  • Intrinsic Continues Advancing As An Open-Source, Graphically-Rich Vulkan Game Engine

    Intrinsic is one of the best looking open-source Vulkan game engines we have seen to date.

    Intrinsic has supported Vulkan since last year when it was open-sourced. We covered it one year ago nearly to the day: Intrinsic Is A Promising, Open-Source, Cross-Platform Vulkan Game Engine.

SCO and the Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • SCO, the Not-Walking Dead, Returns

    SCO. There’s a name I’ll bet you thought you’d never hear again. Guess what? It’s back.

    Wasn’t there a Bond film called “Live to Die Another Day.” Even if there wasn’t, that applies here.

    When last we talked about SCO, in March, 2016, we told you this might happen, although Judge David Nuffer had all but put a bullet through the already dead and bankrupt company’s brain (there’s an oxymoron if ever I wrote one) on February 29, 2016. But exactly a month after the judge’s ruling, the company had somehow managed to scrape together enough spare change to pay the filing fee for an appeal. Today, the 10th US Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that that the appeal could go on, on a claim of misappropriation, but upheld Judge Nuffer’s other two orders.

  • AT&T announces Acumos, an open-source platform for sharing and reusing AI apps
  • AT&T is working on an open-sourced AI project with Linux Foundation

    The nonprofit Linux Foundation has announced that is working on an open source AI project, and AT&T is one of the founding organizations. Called the Acumos Project, its goal, like many open source platforms, is to enable a free exchange of ideas and machine learning solutions using an artificial intelligence framework -- and eventually become a marketplace for AI apps and services.

    The Acumos Project aims to provide tools for casual users, not data scientists, and will focus first on making apps and microservices. While The Linux Foundation's announcement was light on details, it noted that it will sustain the Acumos Project for some time and AT&T and other founder Tech Mahindra will contribute code.

  • Acumos: The Linux Foundation’s New Open Source Project Brings AI’s Power To Any Developer

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB NVMe Linux SSD Benchmarks

Announced at the end of January was the Samsung 970 EVO Plus as the first consumer-grade solid-state drive with 96-layer 3D NAND memory. The Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSDs are now shipping and in this review are the first Linux benchmarks of these new SSDs in the form of the Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB MZ-V7S500B/AM compared to several other SSDs on Linux. The Samsung 970 EVO Plus uses the same Phoenix controller as in their existing SSDs but the big upgrade with the EVO Plus is the shift to the 96-layer 3D NAND memory. Available now through Internet retailers are the 250GB / 500GB / 1TB versions of the 970 EVO Plus at a new low of just $130 USD for the 500GB model or $250 USD for the 1TB version. A 2GB model is expected to ship this spring. Read more

elementary 5 "Juno"

In the spring of 2014 (nearly five years ago), I was preparing a regular presentation I give most years—where I look at the bad side (and the good side) of the greater Linux world. As I had done in years prior, I was preparing a graph showing the market share of various Linux distributions changing over time. But, this year, something was different. In the span of less than two years, a tiny little Linux distro came out of nowhere to become one of the most watched and talked about systems available. In the blink of an eye, it went from nothing to passing several grand-daddies of Linux flavors that had been around for decades. This was elementary. Needless to say, it caught my attention. Read more

Audiophile Linux Promises Aural Nirvana

Linux isn’t just for developers. I know that might come as a surprise for you, but the types of users that work with the open source platform are as varied as the available distributions. Take yours truly for example. Although I once studied programming, I am not a developer. The creating I do with Linux is with words, sounds, and visuals. I write books, I record audio, and a create digital images and video. And even though I don’t choose to work with distributions geared toward those specific tasks, they do exist. I also listen to a lot of music. I tend to listen to most of my music via vinyl. But sometimes I want to listen to music not available in my format of choice. That’s when I turn to digital music. Read more