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July 2017

Fedora 24 End of Life

Filed under
Red Hat

With the recent release of Fedora 26, Fedora 24 officially enters End Of Life (EOL) status on August 8th, 2017. After August 8th, all packages in the Fedora 24 repositories no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates. Furthermore, no new packages will be added to the Fedora 24 collection.

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Qubes OS 4.0-rc1 has been released!

Filed under
OS

No doubt this release marks a major milestone in Qubes OS development. The single most import undertaking which sets this release apart, is the complete rewrite of the Qubes Core Stack. We have a separate set of posts detailing the changes (Why/What/How), and the first post is planned to be released in the coming 2 weeks.

This new Core Stack allows to easily extend the Qubes Architecture in new directions, allowing us to finally build (in a clean way) lots of things we’ve wanted for years, but which would have been too complex to build on the “old” Qubes infrastructure. The new Qubes Admin API, which we introduced in a recent post, is a prime example of one such feature. (Technically speaking, we’ve neatly put the Admin API at the heart of the new Qubes Core Stack so that it really is part of the Core Stack, not merely an “application” built on top of it.)

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OPNsense 17.7 released

Filed under
BSD

For more than two and a half years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

We are writing to you today to announce the final release of version 17.7 “Free Fox”, which, over the course of the last 6 months, includes highlights such as SafeStack application hardening, the Realtek re(4) driver for better network stability, a Quagga plugin with broad routing protocol support and the Unbound resolver as the new default. Additionally, translations for Czech, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and German have been completed for the first time during this development cycle.

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Hands-on: A walk through the openSUSE Leap 42.3 installer

Filed under
SUSE

I wrote about the latest openSUSE Leap release a few days ago. In that post, I included some details about upgrading an existing openSUSE Leap installation to the new release. Since then, I have performed a fresh installation on another of my systems (the Acer Aspire V), so in this post I am going to include screenshots and a brief description of the installation process.

First, let's repeat some of the basic information about this release. The release announcement on the openSUSE website gives a bit of information (and a lot of propaganda) about the new release.The release notes contain a lot more technical detail, so be sure to read them before starting.

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Red Hat (RHT) Acquires Permabit Assets

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it has acquired the assets and technology of Permabit Technology Corporation, a provider of software for data deduplication, compression and thin provisioning. With the addition of Permabit’s data deduplication and compression capabilities to the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat will be able to better enable enterprise digital transformation through more efficient storage options.

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Leftovers: Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review; upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre

Filed under
Misc
  • Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review

    I ordered a litebook after emailing back and forth questions about Linux and the product. They replied super fast and everything sounded great.

    In reality, if I had to guess what is happening, it's a couple teenagers working out of their moms basement, ordering laptops from aliexpress in bulk, installing Linux and then selling them for a profit.

  • Coming Soon | For The Record

    Are we too dependent our Internet connectivity? Should we instead, explore creating our own Linux media servers in place of common streaming services? I’ll give you a preview of my effort to reduce my reliance with common streaming services. I’ll talk about upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre and more!

Linux 4.13 RC3 Released, Torvalds Curses

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.13-rc3

    Another week, another rc.

    Usually rc2 is the really quiet one, but this release cycle rc2 was
    fairly busy and it made me worry a bit about whether there was
    something bad going on with 4.13.

    But no, it was just random timing, and people got started sending in
    fixes early, and this release cycle it's rc3 that is small. It's about
    half the size (in commits) of rc2 - usually things are the other way
    around. Maybe people are starting to go on vacation (August tends to
    be quiet in Europe in particular).

    I'm not complaining. Quiet weeks are nice.

                        Linus

  • Linux 4.13-rc3 Kernel Released: It's A Small One
  • Linus Torvalds pens vintage 'f*cking' rant at kernel dev's 'utter BS'

    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has fired off an expletive-laden rant of the sort that only he seems to find acceptable.

    His post to the Linux Kernel mailing list takes aim at a chap named Kees Cook, who The Register believes to be a Google employee working on security for the company's Pixel phones.

    Cook appears to have earned Torvalds' ire with his post warning of a bug in the way the Linux kernel deals with memory leaks.

    Torvalds' response is stern, kicking off with “Kees, stop this idiocy already”, explaining that the bugs Cook discusses are false positives and then launching into “ it's a f*cking disgrace that you are in denial about the fact that it's the *checking* that is broken, not the code, and are making excuses for shit.”

New Features Of Mesa 17.2, Mesa 17.2 Reaches RC2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The New Features Of Mesa 17.2

    Mesa 17.2 will be officially released in one or two weeks, so here's a recap of all the improvements made to this open-source 3D Linux driver stack over the past quarter.

    Mesa 17.2 continues with complete OpenGL 4.5 support for Intel i965 and RadeonSI while offering partial OpenGL 4.6 support. Hopefully for Mesa 17.3 next quarter we will see OpenGL 4.6 compliance.

  • Mesa 17.2 RC2 Released

    The second release candidate of Mesa 17.2 is now available for testing.

    Emil Velikov has just released Mesa 17.2 RC2 as the latest weekly build of what should become the next quarterly Mesa 3D stable release in one or two weeks, pending how last minute bug squashing goes. With RC2, RadeonSI should be back to working with Steam and no longer crashing.

  • [Mesa-dev] [ANNOUNCE] mesa 17.2.0-rc2

    The second release candidate for Mesa 17.2.0 is now available.

Graphics: ATI/AMD, Radeon, Vega

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Headlines, LibreOffice 6.4 Alpha Quick Look and OpenIndiana 2019.10 Overview

Announcing coreboot 4.11

The coreboot project is proud to announce to have released coreboot 4.11. This release cycle was a bit shorter to get closer to our regular schedule of releasing in spring and autumn. Since 4.10 there were 1630 new commits by over 130 developers. Of these, about 30 contributed to coreboot for the first time. Thank you to all contributors who made 4.11 what it is and welcome to the project to all new contributors! Read more Also: Coreboot 4.11 Brings Many Intel Improvements, New Support For Supermicro / Lenovo Boards

GNOME Development: Technical Reports From Federico Mena-Quintero and Jussi Pakkanen

  • Refactoring the Length type

    Over a couple of years, librsvg's type that represents CSS lengths went from a C representation along the lines of "all data in the world is an int", to a Rust representation that uses some interesting type trickery: C struct with char for units. C struct with a LengthUnits enum. C struct without an embodied direction; each place that needs to normalize needs to get the orientation right. C struct with a built-in direction as an extra field, done at initialization time. Same struct but in Rust. An ugly but workable Parse trait so that the direction can be set at parse/initialization time. Three newtypes LengthHorizontal, LengthVertical, LengthBoth with a common core. A cleaned-up Parse trait. A macro to generate those newtypes. Replace the LengthDir enum with an Orientation trait, and three zero-sized types Horizontal/Vertical/Both that implement the trait. Replace most of the macro with a helper trait LengthTrait that has an Orientation associated type. Replace the helper trait with a single Length<T: Orientation> type, which puts the orientation as a generic parameter. The macro disappears and there is a single implementation for everything. Refactoring never ends!

  • Some intricacies of ABI stability

    As far as I know, there is no known real-world solution to this problem that would scale to a full operating system (i.e. all of Debian, FreeBSD or the like). If there are any university professors reading this needing problems for your grad students, this could be one of them. The problem itself is fairly simple to formulate: make it possible to run two different, ABI incompatible C++ standard libraries within one process. The solution will probably require changes in the compiler, linker and runtime loader. For example, you might extend symbol resolution rules so that they are not global, but instead symbols from, say library bar would first be looked up in its direct descendents (in this case only abi2) and only after that in other parts of the tree. To get you started, here is one potential solution I came up with while writing this post. I have no idea if it actually works, but I could not come up with an obvious thing that would break. I sadly don't have the time or know-how to implement this, but hopefully someone else has.

Graphics and Games: Intel, Vulkan, Trine and Google Stadia

  • Intel's Graphics Driver DoS Fix Last Week Has Hurt Power Consumption

    While the patches overnight about "substantial" improvement in power usage for Intel graphics on Linux were exciting on first look, it's less so now as it turns out last week's graphics driver security fixes is what regressed the Intel graphics power-savings. During last Tuesday's round of Intel security disclosures where there was a fix for denial of service in the Intel graphics driver, it turns out that the CVE-2019-0154 fix is what regressed power usage. The potential Denial of Service vulnerability was about unprivileged users being able to cause a DoS by reading select memory regions when the graphics hardware is in certain low-power states.

  • vkBasalt 0.2 Released With SMAA, Other Vulkan Post Processing Layer Enhancements

    The open-source vkBasalt project was started as a layer implementing Contrast Adaptive Sharpening (akin to Radeon Image Sharpening) for any Vulkan-using GPU/driver/software. The vkBasalt project then picked up FXAA support for this Vulkan post-processing layer while now a new release is out with more functionality added. The vkBasalt 0.2 release is out today and adds support for enhanced sub-pixel morphological anti-aliasing (SMAA) for higher-quality anti-aliasing than FXAA. SMAA is an image-based implementation of MLAA. This release also allows for multiple visual effects to be activated at once where as previously only any one of these image enhancing features could be active at a time.

  • Flax Engine Ported To Linux + Vulkan Rendering Support

    Flax Engine is the latest game engine seeing native Linux support and in the process the renderer also picked up Vulkan support. Flax Engine is a lesser known game engine that now works on Linux alongside Windows and Xbox One. After two years in development, the open beta release of Flax is expected soon.

  • The sad case of Trine on Mesa and Linux in 2019

    A year or so back I was planning on writing a congratulatory article to show my appreciation to Dave Airlie for fixing a long standing bug in Mesa that prevented users of older AMD Radeon HD cards from enjoying Trine Enchanted Edition on the free graphics stack. Bug 91808 resulted in a variety of graphical artifacts which, while not interfering with the gameplay, still put me off using that version of Trine. After several years and a great deal of evident frustration on his part, Airlie was able to track down the root of the problem and at long last was able to push a fix to master in May 2018. Airlie and developers like him are often the unsung heroes of FOSS development, and I wanted to give him a well deserved public pat on the back for his effort in fixing a bug which would only have affected such a small number of people. Unfortunately my research into this led me down an entirely different rabbit hole when I discovered the report for Bug 66067. A much more subtle misrendering of the game's colours and lighting, this bug is present in both Trine 2 and Trine Enchanted Edition and affects all Mesa users. Unlike the previous instance where it was an issue in the drivers that was the culprit, this issue is present in the game binaries themselves.

  • Google Stadia is out now for early adopters, well a few anyway

    Today, the Google Stadia streaming service officially launched for those who picked up the Founder or Premier Edition. Well, sort of anyway. Some people have it, a lot of people don't, we certainly don't and it appears the team at Stadia give different answers to different people on when you will actually be able to access it. I've also seen plenty of people whose orders have been cancelled without warning or explanation. Even worse still, some people have been sent their hardware without an access code. Google have, so far, done a terrible job at communicating on Stadia and so the initial launch doesn't seem to have gone down well at all.