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May 2017

Android Leftovers

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An Early Look At Debian 9.0 Performance vs. Debian 8.8, Ubuntu 17.04, CentOS 7, Clear Linux

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Debian 9.0 has settled on the Linux 4.9 kernel, GNOME Shell 3.22 desktop by default, X.Org Server 1.19.2, Mesa 13.0.6 (yes, sadly not Mesa 17.0 or 17.1), GCC 6.3.0 and is using an EXT4 file-system by default. With Debian 9 is also the switch from ACPI CPUFreq to P-State for CPU frequency scaling on newer Intel hardware, which is why the CPU frequency of this Skylake test system is reflected differently between them on the system table.

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Security Leftovers

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  • Tech pro cautions on attribution of cyber attacks
  • Cyber crime to cost business US$8 trillion: Juniper

    The report, by Juniper Research, also forecasts that the number of personal data records stolen by cyber criminals will reach 2.8 billion in 2017, and almost double to 5 billion in 2020.

  • Russian Hackers Are Using Google’s Own Infrastructure to Hack Gmail Users

    The “Change Password” button linked to a short URL from the link shortener service, a Bitly competitor. But the hackers cleverly disguised it as a legitimate link by using Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages, or AMP. This is a service hosted by the internet giant that was originally designed to speed up web pages on mobile, especially for publishers. In practice, it works by creating a copy of a website’s page on Google’s servers, but it also acts as an open redirect.

  • The sudo tty bug and procps
  • Improving Linux Security with DevSecOps

    Ask people who run IT departments these days what keeps them up at night, and they'll probably tell you it's security—or the lack of it. With the explosive growth of malicious attacks on everything from hospitals to Fortune 500s, security—not hardware, software and even staff—is what currently makes life miserable.

    That's why organizations of all sizes are looking to change fundamentally how they do security. It's no longer a single team's job to make sure systems are secure and internal auditing is good enough to identify and mitigate attacks. Today, everyone is responsible for security, which is the guiding principal of DevSecOps.

    Just as in DevOps, which aims to speed the development of software by improving collaboration and balancing the competing interests of operations teams and developers, DevSecOps seeks to get everyone thinking about security together and up front. Trying to bake in security after systems are built and code is deployed is simply too late.

21-Way NVIDIA Fermi/Kepler/Maxwell/Pascal OpenCL GPU Comparison

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    The tested GPUs included the:

    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 768MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GT 520 1024MB
    Zotac NVIDIA GeForce GT 610 1024MB
    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 1024MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 1024MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2048MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760 2048MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3072MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6144MB
    MSI NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 2048MB
    Zotac NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 2048MB
    eVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4096MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6144MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 8192MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 8192MB
    NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11264MB

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KDE: Krita, FreeBSD, Cutelyst 1.7.0, and Qt

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  • Krita 3.1.4 Open-Source Digital Painting App Improves Loading of GIMP 2.9 Files

    Krita 3.1.4 is here as the latest bugfix and stability release of the popular application, which is loved by amateur and professional digital artists alike, and it's a recommended update for anyone using Krita 3.1.3 or a previous version from the Krita 3.1 series. It has been released for all supported platforms.

  • Moving KDE-FreeBSD ports infrastructure

    We’re updating the documentation (in the KDE Community Wiki), but mostly things will be simpler, and it may make sense to simply checkout /usr/ports from the KDE-FreeBSD ports tree instead of anything else. We’ll continue to call it “Area51”, even if that string doesn’t occur in its name anymore.

  • Cutelyst 1.7.0 released! WebSocket support added.

    WebSocket support is probably a key feature to have on a modern web framework, Perl Catalyst doesn’t look like it wasn’t designed with it in mind, the way I found to do WS there wasn’t intuitive.

  • QProcess Or KProcess ?

    Most of the time of community bonding period was spent giving college exams. By the time my exams got over, I only had a week left to make something useful of the community bonding period time.

  • Qt 5.9 Launches as Long-Term Supported Release with C++11 Compliant Compiler

    Qt Project's Lars Knoll was happy to announce today, May 31, 2017, the release and immediate availability for download of Qt 5.9.0 stable and long-term supported (LTS) series of the open-source and cross-platform application framework.

  • Qt 5.9 LTS Released With Its OpenVG Back-End & Much More

    Lars Knoll has just announced the availability of Qt 5.9. Qt 5.9 has big improvements around performance and stability as noted by Lars, which is good given this series' LTS state. Qt LTS releases are supported for a period of three years.

  • Qt 5.9 released

    I’m happy to let you all know that Qt 5.9.0 has just been released. A lot of work has been put into it, making Qt 5.9 the best Qt version we have developed so far.

Tizen Spreading in Homes

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Mutt An Open Source Text Based Email Client For Linux

​Mutt is an email client but with a different approach. It is fully based on the terminal when it comes to work. Mutt is a very simple email client easy to configure and use. It was really awesome to use it and now it is the default email client on my PC. Let us see more about mutt and see how to install mutt on our Linux box.

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Containers: Cisco, CoreOS, Blocks of Containers, and Kubernetes

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  • Cisco Advances OpenStack and Container Networking Efforts

    Cisco is working on multiple efforts to help improve the state of both OpenStack and container networking. In a video interview, Lew Tucker, Vice President and CTO, Cloud Computing, provides insight ino the current and future state of networking for OpenStack and container environments.

  • CoreOS Fleet Fades Away in Favor of Kubernetes and Tectonic

    When container vendor CoreOS first got started, among its primary innovations was the Fleet cluster management system. Now in 2017, Fleet is on its way out, as CoreOS has standardized on Kubernetes as the basis for its commercial aspirations with the Tectonic platform.

    At the core of Fleet is the open-source etcd distributed key-value store that CoreOS developed, which has now also become the cornerstone of Kubernetes. In a 2014 interview with ServerWatch, Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS, explained that Fleet was the natural step after developing etcd.

  • Building Blocks of Containers

    This article series previews the new Containers Fundamentals training course from The Linux Foundation, which is designed for those who are new to container technologies. In previous excerpts, we talked about what containers are and what they're not and explained a little of their history. In this last post of the series, we will look at the building blocks for containers, specifically, namespaces, control groups, and UnionFS.

  • The folks who brought you Kubernetes now want to make it easier to use

    Kubernetes is quickly becoming something of a standard for software container orchestration, but in the grand scheme of things, it’s still very much an early adopter’s product. A new open-source project from Heptio and others hopes to change that.

EUPL Becomes GPLv3-compatible, GPL Defended by Courts

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  • European Commission updates EUPL open source licence

    The European Commission has updated the European Union Public Licence (EUPL). Version 1.2 has a wider coverage, making it easier to use the licence to publish data, documents, technical specifications and standards, as well as software source code. In addition, the new licence is compatible with a wider range of other free and open source software licences, including the GNU Public Licence v3.

  • 100 Million Reasons For Open Source Compliance

    CoKinetic Systems Corporation filed suit against Panasonic Avionics Corporation, seeking damages in excess of $100 million, in part, for violation of the GPL v2 open source license. CoKinetic alleged that Panasonic blocked competitors from having the ability to develop software for Panasonic’s In-flight Entertainment (IFE) hardware by refusing to distribute the source code for its open-source Linux based operating system. CoKinetic alleged that this software controls the basic functions of Panasonic IFE hardware systems. According to CoKinetic, this is a willful violation of the GPL License, exposing Panasonic as a willful infringer of the copyrights of thousands of software developers that have contributed to Linux. The suit includes other very interesting legal claims, detailed below.

  • Artifex v. Hancom: Open Source is Now an Enforceable Contract

    Today, as much as 50 percent of the code used in all software (including Internet of Things devices) is comprised of open source software. While open source provides a convenient short cut for software developers to be more agile and efficient – there’s also a hidden risk: The law. While open source components are by definition free and available for anyone to use – there are limitations and most open source components have licensing obligations that developers must comply with.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: Logic Supply and Linux 4.15/Linux 4.16

  • Tiny Apollo Lake based mini-PCs run Ubuntu
    Logic Supply unveiled two 116 x 83 x 34mm mini-PCs built around a Celeron N3350: a CL200 with 3x USB ports and a CL210 that doubles memory to 2GB LPDDR4 and 32GB eMMC, and adds a second mini-DP and GbE port. Logic Supply announced its smallest mini-PCs to date with CL200 and CL210 models that measure just 116 x 83 x 34mm. The CL200 ships with Ubuntu 16.04 while the more advanced CL210 also offers Windows 10 IoT. Both of these “IoT Edge Device” mini-PCs tap Intel’s dual-core, 1.1GHz Celeron N3350 with 6W TDP from the Apollo Lake generation, and support digital media, data acquisition, automation, and network gateway applications.
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Continues Prepping With The Linux 4.15 Kernel
    There were various calls by independent end-users voicing their two cents that Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" should ship with Linux 4.16 instead of Linux 4.15, but that isn't going to happen. In several different places the past few weeks I've seen various remarks made of how "Ubuntu 18.04 should ship with Linux 4.16" on the basis of either better Spectre/Meltdown support, Linux 4.16 will be out in time and neither 4.15 or 4.16 are even LTS releases, better hardware support, or users simply wanting all the goodies in Linux 4.16. But that's simply foolish given Ubuntu 18.04 is being a Long Term Support release and how close the timing ends up being as is.
  • Kernel Team summary: March 21, 2018
    On the road to 18.04 we have a 4.15 based kernel in the Bionic repository.

Graphics: mesa 17.3.7, mesa 18.0.0-rc5, VGA_Switcheroo and More

  • mesa 17.3.7
    Mesa 17.3.7 is now available.
  • Mesa 17.3.7 Released With A Bunch Of Fixes
    While Mesa 18.0 should finally be out on Friday as the major quarterly update to the Mesa 3D drivers, Mesa 17.3.7 is out today and it's a rather big update for being just another point release to last month's 17.3 series. Last week marked the release candidate of Mesa 17.3.7 with 50+ changes and then on Monday came a second release candidate given all the extra patches.
  • mesa 18.0.0-rc5
    The fifth and final release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available.
  • Mesa 18.0-RC5 Released, Mesa 18.0 Should Finally Be Out On Friday
    Nearly one and a half months since Mesa 18.0-RC4 and nearly one month since last seeing any Git activity on the "18.0" Mesa Git branch, it's finally been updated today with the availability of Mesa 18.0-RC5. Mesa release manager Emil Velikov announced this long-awaited release candidate today. He says this is the fifth and final release candidate. Given the month plus since the last RC, there are many fixes/changes in this release: In fact, more than 80 changes in total for Mesa 18.0-RC5.
  • Improved VGA_Switcheroo Going Into Linux 4.17
    Google's Sean Paul has sent in the final drm-misc-next pull request to DRM-Next of new feature material for the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle. Most notable with this final drm-misc-next update is the recent VGA_Switcheroo improvements by Lukas Wunner. This is the device link
  • AMD Posts Open-Source Driver Patches For Vega 12
    It's been a while since last hearing anything about the rumored "Vega 12" GPU but coming out this morning are a set of 42 patches providing support for this unreleased GPU within the mainline Linux kernel. Alex Deucher of AMD's Linux driver team sent out the 42 patches this morning providing initial support for Vega 12 within the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver.
  • DXVK Now Has An On-Disk Shader Cache
    DXVK, the exciting project implementing the Direct3D 11 API over Vulkan for Wine gamers, now has an on-disk shader cache.
  • Freedreno's MSM DRM Driver Continues Prepping For Adreno 600 Series Support
    Rob Clark has submitted the MSM DRM driver changes to DRM-Next for the Linux 4.17 kernel for benefiting Qualcomm SoC owners. Changes this cycle for the open-source MSM DRM driver include DSI updates, fixing some race conditions, DebugFS enhancements, MDP5 fixes, and refactoring/prep work for the Adreno 600 series support.
  • NVIDIA's Jetson TK1 Is Being EOL'ed Next Month
    Easily one of our favorite ARM single-board computers ever, the Jetson TK1 from NVIDIA, will be facing retirement next month. A Phoronix reader has tipped us off that NVIDIA has sent out their EOL notice that shipments of the Jetson TK1 developer kits will be ending by the end of April. Following that, it will just live on until distributors run out of their inventory.

Slax Linux Distribution Begins Planning For Its First 2018 Release

Arriving last Christmas was a rejuvenated release of Slax, the long-running, lightweight Linux distribution with its development restarting last year and having shifted from being a Slackware derivative to Debian and moving from KDE to Fluxbox+Compton. Those involved are working on a new Slax release for 2018. Slax lead developer Tomas Matejicek has announced work is underway on the next version of this modern Slax OS with Debian+Fluxbox. Read more Original: Work in progress on next version

Games: The Pillars of the Earth, Steam, Mighty Fight Federation, Civilization VI: Rise and Fall