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March 2017

Microsoft Surrenders

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Microsoft

Open source OTA software targets Linux devices

Filed under
Linux

Mender’s open source, Yocto-optimized OTA updater for embedded Linux devices features a dual A/B rootfs partition layout with automatic rollback support.

After a two-year develop cycle, Mender has released the first production-ready version of its eponymous over-the-air (OTA) updating software for embedded Linux devices. The software is promoted as being the only OTA product that offers open source licensing for both the client installed on the device and the management server.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

GNOME Mini News

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GNOME
  • Rust’ic GNOME, Day 3

    Today is day 3 of the GNOME+Rust hackfest in Mexico City at the beautiful new Red Hat office. We’ve been working on all sorts of stuff since we were graced with the presence of a few Rust hackers from Mozilla Research.

  • [GNOME] Recipe Icon

    Initially I was going to do a more elaborate workflow tutorial, but time flies when you’re having fun on 3.24. With the release out, I’d rather publish this than let it rot. Maybe the next one!

Security Leftovers

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Security

Linux/FOSS/Containers on Servers

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Server
  • Docker at Four: The State of the Docker Ecosystem from 2013 to Today

    Docker containers turned four years old this month. If you were paying attention to Docker in its early days, you know that the Docker ecosystem today looks nothing like it did then. Here's how the Docker world has evolved since Docker's launch in 2013.

  • Kubernetes Federation in a Post-Configuration Management Universe

    When containerization was young, one of its early principles was the ideal of immutable infrastructure, the ability to build a support structure for a container that was flexible enough to meet the container’s needs during its lifespan, which may be short, but remained a fixed asset throughout that duration.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Welcomes Containerd and Rkt as New Projects

    At the CloudNative/Kubecon EU event in Berlin on March 29, the big news was that Docker contributed its containerd runtime, while CoreOS contributed its rkt (pronounced rocket) runtime to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The containerd and rkt projects are rival container runtimes that aim to implement specifications that are being formally defined by the Open Container Initiative (OCI) project.

  • Why Kubernetes Sucks and How to Fix It

    Joe Beda is in a better position than most to understand what's wrong with Kubernetes. Beda helped to start the Kubernetes project while he was at Google; he now runs a startup called Heptio that is aiming to help further enable Kubernetes.

    At the Kubecon / CloudNative EU conference in Berlin, Beda delivered a keynote address on what needs to change in Kubernetes to bring in more users.

Kernel, Graphics, and Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Getting more out of Qt Quick with OpenVG

    In Qt 5.9 is now possible to render Qt Quick applications with OpenVG when using hardware that supports it. This is made possible by a new scene graph adaptation that uses EGL and OpenVG to render Qt Quick scenes. When using Qt for Device Creation, it means that it now be possible to run with graphics hardware acceleration on some devices where today only software rendering is available.

  • Qt 5.9's OpenVG Renderer For Hardware Lacking OpenGL

    One of the many new features for the upcoming Qt 5.9 is an OpenVG renderer for hardware acceleration on some embedded platforms that lack OpenGL capabilities.

    OpenVG for the uninitiated is a 2D vector graphics API backed by The Khronos Group. It hasn't been updated in almost one decade with OpenGL ES largely taking over on the mobile/embedded front, but there still is some embedded hardware out there with still having OpenVG v1.1 drivers. There used to be an OpenVG state tracker in Mesa's Gallium3D, but that's long been dead.

  • Kdenlive status update

    Ever since the port to QT5/KF5 in 2015, Kdenlive has seen an increasing momentum to developing its full potential in being a stable and reliable video editing tool which the FLOSS community can use to create content and democratize communication. In 2016 the project saw a redesign of its visual identity (logo, website), the reintroduction of some much requested tools like rotoscoping and a Windows port. During these couple of years we’ve seen a boom in the size of the community.

  • Kdenlive's Status Ahead Of 17.04

    The Kdenlive video editor project in the KDE camp has published a new status update concerning the health of the project.

    Kdenlive developers continue seeing momentum building around their video editor since reviving it with the transition to Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5. Over the past year they have added many tools, a Windows port, and other efforts to make Kdenlive pro-capable.

  • Tearing with Nvidia Proprietary Drivers on Plasma? Try this.

    This is a neat little trick that’s been making the rounds, and after seeing success with several people on Reddit I thought it was worth posting somewhere more visible. This will look at removing screen tearing (often entirely) when using Nvidia Proprietary graphics on the Plasma Desktop.

  • [Krita] Game art course released!

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  • Krita 3.1.3 Alpha released

    We’re working like crazy on the next versions of Krita — 3.1.3 and 4.0. Krita 3.1.3 will be a stable bugfix release, 4.0 will have the vector work and the python scripting. This week we’ve prepared the first 3.1.3 alpha builds for testing! The final release of 3.1.3 is planned for end of April.

    We’re still working on fixing more bugs for the final 3.1.3 release, so please test these builds, and if you find an issue, check whether it’s already in the bug tracker, and if not, report it!

  • Linux Thursday with BtrFS, Internet Privacy, KDE Hate

    It’s Thursday! And you know what that means… It’s Linux Day on the Lunduke Hour! In today’s episode Matt Hartley and I take a boat load of questions from the viewers on BtrFS, KDE, Internet Privacy, the ending of the Linux Action Show, Linux Marketing issues, and the weirdness (or lack of weirdness) of Linux.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • OpenShot 2.3 Video Editor Released
  • OpenShot 2.3 Released With Transform & Razor Tools

    A new version of OpenShot video editor is available to download. OpenShot 2.3 adds a transform tool, improves timeline zoom, and a whole lot more.

  • Museeks Music Player Adds Native Notifications, Tray Applet, More

    It’s been nearly 6 months since we last heard from Museeks, a stylish cross-platform desktop music player.

  • 2 open source Adobe InDesign scripts

    For my job, I must use InDesign. For freelance work, I use InDesign, Scribus, GIMP, and Photoshop, depending on whether I am creating the artwork or starting with someone else's work.

    [...]

    Before I started looking for a solution to my PDF question, I had never considered using open source solutions to customize Adobe InDesign. After this exploration, I have expanded my knowledge of open source capabilities and just how valuable and useful open source solutions are, even when working in conjunction with a closed source application.

  • Telegram Voice Calls Are Coming to Desktop Linux App

    Messaging app Telegram is rolling out encrypted voice calls to its mobile apps, but has confirmed that Telegram desktop will also get the feature.

  • Does Adobe Hate Linux?

    As the press prepares to cover the release of Ubuntu 17.04, it should be clear in the tech industry just how big of a player Ubuntu is to the ecosystem. While a good bit of reviews will focus on what’s new in the release and what’s headed down the pipeline, I’d like to comment on what’s still missing and better yet, what can be done about it.

    What’s missing is a graphics suite and there’s really no excuse for not having one. Yes, we have graphics applications, but there are advantages to having a suite, not just a one-off application that can do something in 12 steps when its competitor can do it in three. The industry leader in this market is Adobe, whose Creative Cloud suite is leaps and bounds away from its competitors in terms of market share.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How Software Is Helping Big Companies Dominate
    Antitrust deserves the attention it’s getting, and the tech platforms raise important questions. But the rise of big companies — and the resulting concentration of industries, profits, and wages — goes well beyond tech firms and is about far more than antitrust policy. In fact, research suggests that big firms are dominating through their use of software. In 2011, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen declared that “software is eating the world.” Its appetizer seems to have been smaller companies. [...] This model, where proprietary software pairs with other strengths to form competitive advantage, is only becoming more common. Years ago, one of us (James) started a company that sold publishing software. The business model was to write the software and then sell licenses to publishers. That model still exists, including in online publishing where companies like Automattic, maker of the open source content management system WordPress, sell hosting and related services to publishers. One-off licenses have given way to monthly software-as-a-service subscriptions, but this model still fits with Carr’s original thesis: software companies make technology that other companies pay for, but from which they seldom derive unique advantage. That’s not how Vox Media does it. Vox is a digital publishing company known, in part, for its proprietary content management system. Vox does license its software to some other companies (so far, mostly non-competitors), but it is itself a publisher. Its primary business model is to create content and sell ads. It pairs proprietary publishing software with quality editorial to create competitive advantage. Venture capitalist Chris Dixon has called this approach the “full-stack startup.” “The old approach startups took was to sell or license their new technology to incumbents,” says Dixon. “The new, ‘full stack’ approach is to build a complete, end-to-end product or service that bypasses incumbents and other competitors.” Vox is one example of the full-stack model. The switch from the software vendor model to the full-stack model is seen in government statistics. Since 1998, the share of firm spending on software that goes to pre-packaged software (the vendor model) has been declining. Over 70% of the firms’ software budgets goes to code developed in-house or under custom contracts. And the amount they spend on proprietary software is huge — $250 billion in 2016, nearly as much as they invested in physical capital net of depreciation.
  • Metsä Wood - Open Source Wood Winner: ClipHut Structural Building System
  • Shutting the open sauce bottle
    While open source software has revolutionised the enterprise software world, a few people are starting to wonder if its very nature will survive the age of the cloud. The concept that software can be used by pretty much anyone for pretty much anything is causing its developers big problems in the era of distributed cloud computing services. Two open-source software companies have decided to alter the licences under which some of their software is distributed, with the expressed intent of making it harder -- or impossible -- for cloud computing providers to offer a service based around that software.
  • How do we handle and use such enormous amounts of data?
    How many gigabytes of data did we (the people of Earth) create yesterday? ...brain. is. thinking... More than 2.5 billion! And it's growing. Yes, it's hard for us to wrap our human brains around it. So, the question the Command Line Heros podcast deals with this week is: How do we handle and use such enormous amounts of data?
  • Security updates for Tuesday

Linux Leftovers

  • Sorry, Linux. Kubernetes is now the OS that matters [Ed: Mac Asay does't know what an operating system is. This is what happens when people with a law degree write about technology. And he trolls Linux for clicks.]
  • Clear Linux Making Progress With Encrypted Installations
    One of the features I've personally been looking forward to is the official support for encrypted installations with Clear Linux. While many don't view it as a particular desktop distribution, it does have all of the packages I personally need for my main production system. So I've been wanting to see how well it could work out as my main desktop OS and to chronicle that experience. Having official support for encrypted installations has been one of the last blockers for my requirements. You can currently setup Clear on an encrypted installation manually, but for simplicity and wanting to keep to the "official" installation routes, I've been waiting for them to officially support encrypted installs... Especially in this day and age, anyone installing a desktop Linux distribution particularly on a mobile/laptop/ultrabook should really be doing a full-disk encryption.
  • The Linux Throwie: A Non-Spacefaring Satellite
    Throwies occupy a special place in hardware culture — a coin cell battery, LED, and a magnet that can be thrown into an inaccessible place and stick there as a little beacon of colored light. Many of us will fondly remember this as a first project. Alas, time marches inevitably on, and launching cheerful lights no longer teaches me new skills. With a nod to those simpler times, I’ve been working on the unusual idea of building a fully functional server that can be left in remote places and remain functional, like a throwie (please don’t actually throw it). It’s a little kooky, yet should still deliver a few years of occasional remote access if you leave it somewhere with sunlight.
  • OnePlus To Launch 5G Phone In 2019; $100 Costlier Than OnePlus 6T
  • OnePlus Releases OxygenOS Open Beta 7, OnePlus Roaming Launched
    Chinese company OnePlus has released the new OxygenOS Open Beta 7 for its OnePlus 6 smartphone, which has introduced several updates and features.

OSS: Development and Conferences

  • Give your students edit access to their course syllabus
    I wanted to give students more agency in their learning. So I let them make pull requests against the syllabus. [...] This exercise was a learning experience for both my students and me, as we clearly had different visions of what constituted a "disruption." While we all agreed that students should pay attention to the instructor and engage in all classroom activities, students thought they should be able to take "important" calls during class time and that texting during class was acceptable. I thought that cell phones should be turned off entirely during class. Students also thought that leaving the classroom to get a drink without asking permission was acceptable, while I thought that they should handle thirst needs before or after class. This resulted in a discussion about professionalism and the expectations associated with college-level work. We discussed what constituted a distraction and agreed that making sounds, whispering, and talking in class all counted as distractions. This in turn led to a discussion of the impacts distractions can have on a learning environment and the importance of paying attention in class. We also explored the impact various learning technologies can have on a classroom—for example, the tools students with disabilities require to fully participate in class, such as a screen reader—and agreed that noise generated by these was acceptable under the policy we intended to construct.
  • Open source tools to consider for your RESTful APIs
    At the start of a RESTful API development project, a software team might be tempted to buy an expensive commercial API management tool when an open source tool can just as easily do the trick. In fact, there are plenty of open source tools that can help with each stage of the API lifecycle and help get an API development program off the ground at low cost.
  • London Perl Workshop

    As london.pm celebrates its 20th anniversary, join Katherine Spice in conversation with a panel of the group's former leaders.

  • GNOME at Capitole du Libre 2018
    Last Saturday and Sunday I went to the Capitole du Libre 2018 to animate the GNOME booth and help on the Purism one.
  • Find Out the Visa Requirements to Attend oSC19
    For people planning on attending the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26, there are certain requirements necessary to receive a visa for those who are not a citizen of a Schengen country.

Red Hat/IBM: OpenShift and Ansible, RHEL Updates