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January 2017

Android Leftovers

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Android

Meet the $114,725 Ubuntu server with eight Nvidia Tesla P100 GPUs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

The Ibex Pro is one supercharged machine that will probably hurt your electric bill.

System76's fastest Ibex Pro with Ubuntu Server 16.10 packs some crazy horsepower with Intel's latest 22-core Xeon E5 v4 chips and eight Nvidia Tesla P100 graphics processors.

It's got the same number of GPUs as Nvidia's superfast DGX-1, which is being used for deep learning. System76 is targeting the Ibex Pro -- which is a rack server -- at the same market as the DGX-1. The server has fewer, but newer, CPUs, compared to the DGX-1.

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OPNsense 17.1 Released, Based On FreeBSD 11

OPNsense 17.1 is now available as the newest release of this network-focused FreeBSD-based operating system forked from pfSense.

It's now been two years since the first official release of OPNsense and to celebrate they have out a big update. OPNsense 17.1 re-bases to using FreeBSD 11.0, there's now a SSH remote installer, new language support, more hardening features used from HardenedBSD, new plugins, integrated authentication via PAM, and many other improvements. Some of the new plug-ins include FTP Proxy, Tinc VPN, and Let's Encrypt support.

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Open source GIS in Italian public administration

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OSS

The Italian Association for Free Software Geographic Information Systems (GFOSS.it) is conducting a survey to collect information about the use of this kind of software in Italy’s public sector. The results will be made public at the GFOSS.it meeting, in Genoa from 8 to 11 February.

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Austria set to increase its use of open source

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OSS

Public administrations in Austria need to increase their use of free and open source software, the government of Austria says in its Digital Strategy. The strategy proposes to ‘push’ (forcierung) open source by public administrations. This is intended to accelerate its uptake, explains Federal Chancellery for Digitalisation.

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Security News

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Security

  • You're taking the p... Linux encryption app Cryptkeeper has universal password: 'p'

    Linux encryption app Cryptkeeper has a bug that causes it to use a single-letter universal decryption password: "p".

    The flawed version is in Debian 9 (Stretch), currently in testing, but not in Debian 8 (Jessie). The bug appears to be a result of a bad interaction with the encfs encrypted filesystem's command line interface: Cryptkeeper invokes encfs and attempts to enter paranoia mode with a simulated 'p' keypress – instead, it sets passwords for folders to just that letter.

  • Reproducible Builds: week 92 in Stretch cycle

    John Gilmore wrote an interesting mail about how Cygnus.com worked on reproducible builds in the early 1990s. (It's eye opening to see how the dealt with basically the very same problems we're dealing with today, how they solved them and then to realize that most of this has been forgotten and bit-rotted in the last 20 years. How will we prevent history repeating it)self here?)

  • MongoDB ransom attacks continue to plague administrators

    Earlier this month, Salted Hash reported on a surge in attacks against publicly accessible MongoDB installations.

    Since January 3, the day of that first report, the number of victims has climbed from about 200 databases to more than 40,000. In addition to MongoDB, those responsible for the attacks have started targeting Elasticsearch and CouchDB.

    No matter the platform being targeted, the message to the victim is the same; send a small Bitcoin payment to the listed address, or forever lose access to your files.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Be the open source supply chain

    I would bet that whoever is best at managing and influencing the open source supply chain will be best positioned to create the most innovative products. In this article, I’ll explain why you should be a supply chain influencer, and how your organization can be an active participant in your supply chain.

  • Leon Anavi’s Open Source News Vlog

    All of us at the FOSS Force office have become big fans of this new open source news blog from Leon Anavi and can’t wait until the next edition comes out in February. Don’t worry Leon, your English is fine. Keep ’em coming.

  • Announcing the Google Code-in 2016 Winners!

    Drum roll please! We are very proud to announce the 2016 Google Code-in (GCI) Grand Prize Winners and Finalists. Each year we see the number of student participants increase, and 2016 was no exception: 1,340 students from 62 countries completed an impressive 6,418 tasks. Winners and Finalists were chosen by the 17 open source organizations and are listed alphabetically below.

  • LinuxCon, CloudOpen, and ContainerCon Come to China for the First Time in 2017

    The Linux Foundation, a non-profit organization promoting the adoption of the latest Linux and Open Source technologies to the enterprise industry, is announcing the upcoming schedule for LinuxCon, CloudOpen, and ContainerCon conferences.

    Taking in place for the first time in China, between June 19-20, 2017, the LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen events will be held at the China National Convention Center in Beijing, where it is expected that thousands of attendees will share their knowledge, collaborate on new technologies, and learn about the latest Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies, including cloud, containers, microservices, and networking.

  • 5 new guides for working with OpenStack

    OpenStack experience continues to be among the most in-demand skills in the tech world, with more and more organizations seeking to build and manage their own open source clouds. But OpenStack is a huge domain of knowledge, containing dozen of individual projects that are being actively developed at a rapid pace. Just keeping your skills up to date can be a challenge.

  • C++ Support Added To GCC's libcc1, Benefiting GDB

    Another late feature addition to GCC 7 is C++ support for libcc1.

    Libcc1 is the GCC cc1 plugin for the GDB debugger. With the latest GCC SVN/Git code tonight is now C++ support to complement the C interfaces.

Android Leftovers

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Android

Red Hat News

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Red Hat
  • Developing open leaders

    For many people, that requires a profound mindset shift in how to think about leaders. Yet in some ways, it's what we all intuitively know about how organizations really work. As Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst has pointed out, in any organization, you have the thermometers—people who reflect the organizational "temperature" and sentiment and direction—and then you have the thermostats—people who set those things for the organization.

  • ​Monash University gets multi-petabyte computing boost from Red Hat, Dell EMC

    Monash University has implemented a multi-petabyte deployment at its eResearch Centre, giving the Melbourne-based advanced computing facility the capacity to store and manage massive workloads of data.

    The university implemented a software-defined solution that uses Red Hat Ceph Storage on Dell EMC PowerEdge R630 and R730xd rack servers that it expects will accelerate application performance, simplify systems management, and address the university's growing data storage requirements.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Downgraded by Vetr Inc.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

More in Tux Machines

Open Hardware/Modding: Raspberry Pi, RISC-V, HiFiBerry, and More

  • Retro Reproduction Captures The Style Of The Sol-20 | Hackaday

    In the early years of the computer revolution, a machine like the Sol-20 really stood out. Where most hobbyist machines had front panels that bristled with toggle switches and LEDs, the Sol-20 was a sleek, all-in-one that looked like an electric typewriter in a walnut-trimmed box. Unfortunately, it was also quite expensive, so not that many were sold. This makes them hard enough to find 40 years later that building his own reproduction Sol-20 is about the only way for [Michael Gardi] to have one of his own.

  • Imagination Catapults into RISC-V

    Imagination unveiled four RISC-V-based “Catapult” CPU cores: two 32-bit MCU cores and two 64-bit designs that run Linux, including an automotive functional safety core. The big news on the first day of the RISC-V Summit in San Francisco was the announcement from Imagination Technologies that it was launching four RISC-V core designs under a Catapult brand. This summer, Imagination revealed it was building RISC-V CPU cores, and it has now announced four Catapult CPU designs. The in-order cores include two 32-bit MCU-like cores and two 64-bit models that run Linux. The UK-based company refers to the four core categories as “dynamic microcontrollers; real-time embedded CPUs; high-performance application CPUs; and functionally safe automotive CPUs.”

  • Adding Optical Audio to the Raspberry Pi with One Chip

    In the home theater space most people would tell you the age of optical audio, known officially as TOSLINK, is over. While at one time they were the standard for surround sound systems, the fiber cables with their glowing red tips have now been largely supplanted by the all-in-one capabilities of HDMI on new TVs and audio receivers. But of course, that doesn’t mean all that TOSLINK-compatible hardware that’s in the field simply disappears. If you’re looking to connect a Raspberry Pi to the optical port of your AV system, [Nick Sayer] has you covered. His “TOSLINK Transceiver Hat” utilizes a WM8804 chip from Cirrus Logic to go from the Pi’s I2S audio output to S/PDIF. From there the signal goes directly into the TOSLINK input and output modules, which have the appropriate fiber optic hardware and drivers built-in. All you have to do from a software standpoint is enable a boot overlay intended for a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) from HiFiBerry.

  • Guitar Pickguard Adds MIDI Capabilities

    For a standard that has been in use since the 1980s, MIDI is still one of the most dominant forces on the musical scene even today. It’s fast, flexible, and offers a standard recognized industry-wide over many different types of electronic instruments. Even things which aren’t instruments can be turned into musical devices like the infamous banana keyboard via the magic of MIDI, and it also allows augmentation of standard instruments with other capabilities like this guitar with a MIDI interface built into the pick guard. [Ezra] is the creator of this unique musical instrument which adds quite a few capabilities to his guitar. The setup is fairly straightforward: twelve wires run to the pick guard which are set up as capacitive sensors and correspond with a note on the chromatic scale. Instead of using touchpads, using wires allows him to bend away the “notes” that he doesn’t need for any particular piece of music. The wires are tied back to an Adafruit Feather 32u4 microcontroller behind the neck of the guitar which also has a few selectors for changing the way that the device creates tones. He can set the interface to emit single notes or continuously play notes, change the style, can change their octave, and plenty of other features as well.

Firefox 96 Enters Public Beta Testing with More Performance and Security Improvements

Firefox 96 isn’t a major update, but it’s the first release of the open-source web browser in 2022 and it introduces several performance and security improvements to make your browsing experience more enjoyable, more reliable, and much safer. For example, the upcoming Firefox release significantly reduces the main thread load, significantly improves noise-suppression and auto-gain-control, slightly improves echo-cancellation, and enforces the Cookie Policy: Same-Site=lax option by default to protect users against Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF) attacks. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • A mysterious threat actor is running hundreds of malicious Tor relays

    Since at least 2017, a mysterious threat actor has run thousands of malicious servers in entry, middle, and exit positions of the Tor network in what a security researcher has described as an attempt to deanonymize Tor users. Tracked as KAX17, the threat actor ran at its peak more than 900 malicious servers part of the Tor network, which typically tends to hover around a daily total of up to 9,000-10,000. Some of these servers work as entry points (guards), others as middle relays, and others as exit points from the Tor network. Their role is to encrypt and anonymize user traffic as it enters and leaves the Tor network, creating a giant mesh of proxy servers that bounce connections between each other and provide the much-needed privacy that Tor users come for. Servers added to the Tor network typically must have contact information included in their setup, such as an email address, so Tor network administrators and law enforcement can contact server operators in the case of a misconfiguration or file an abuse report.

  • Someone Is Running Lots of Tor Relays

    Since 2017, someone is running about a thousand — 10% of the total — Tor servers in an attempt to deanonymize the network...

  • Security updates for Tuesday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (nss), Debian (roundcube and runc), openSUSE (aaa_base, brotli, clamav, glib-networking, gmp, go1.16, hiredis, kernel, mozilla-nss, nodejs12, nodejs14, openexr, openssh, php7, python-Babel, ruby2.5, speex, wireshark, and xen), Oracle (kernel and nss), Red Hat (kpatch-patch, nss, rpm, and thunderbird), SUSE (brotli, clamav, glib-networking, gmp, kernel, mariadb, mozilla-nss, nodejs12, nodejs14, openssh, php7, python-Babel, and wireshark), and Ubuntu (busybox, mariadb-10.3, mariadb-10.5, python-django, and samba).

  • Hitachi Energy RTU500 OpenLDAP | CISA

    All information products included in https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ics are provided "as is" for informational purposes only. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) does not provide any warranties of any kind regarding any information contained within. DHS does not endorse any commercial product or service, referenced in this product or otherwise. Further dissemination of this product is governed by the Traffic Light Protocol (TLP) marking in the header. For more information about TLP, see https://us-cert.cisa.gov/tlp/.

  • Hitachi Energy XMC20 and FOX61x | CISA

    All information products included in https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ics are provided "as is" for informational purposes only. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) does not provide any warranties of any kind regarding any information contained within. DHS does not endorse any commercial product or service, referenced in this product or otherwise. Further dissemination of this product is governed by the Traffic Light Protocol (TLP) marking in the header. For more information about TLP, see https://us-cert.cisa.gov/tlp/.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Single Node OKD (OpenShift)

    Everytime I get to use Red Hat’s Open Shift I think to myself: “I should use OpenShift more”. It is a really great tool not just for high availability clusters but for general software development also. Its Web interface is super intuitive and nice to use, and you can provision all sorts of stuff in minutes. And everything is open source. Its really great. So naturally I decided to run it locally, especially after the news that starting from version 4.8 you can use it on single node architecture also. I decided to run it virtualized in libvirt so I can destroy it if I no longer needed. Hooray!

  • Fedora on NVIDIA Jetson Xavier – nullr0ute's blog

    The last two years or so I’ve been working with NVIDIA on general distro support including UEFI and ACPI for their Jetson Xavier platforms. Their Xavier platform, except a few quirks, are mostly SystemReady-ES compliant, so having a SBBR compliant firmware goes quite some way to having a widely available, relatively affordable, platform that “just works” for the arm ecosystem. I was very excited to finally have NVIDIA finally release the first version in March this year. This firmware is a standard UEFI firmware based on the open source TianoCore/EDK2 reference firmware, it allows booting in either ACPI or Device-Tree mode and supports all the basic things needed. The ACPI mode is not as fully featured as the Device-Tree mode as yet. In ACPI you get compute (cpu/memory/virt etc), PCIe, USB, network, which is just fine if you’re just looking for standard server or for testing a SystemReady system but there’s no display or accelerator support as yet. The Device-Tree mode is more feature full but both work pretty well with upstream kernels and NVIDIA are improving and upstreaming more things regularly. For flashing with the latest Fedora releases you’ll want the Linux for Tegra (L4T) R32.6.1 release and the latest UEFI firmware (1.1.2 ATM). The R32.6.1 release fixes issues with python3.9 and later so you’ll need that for Fedora. The following will extract everything into a directory called Linux_for_Tegra. Note the release for Xavier is different to the L4T for the TX1/TX2 series of devices such as the nano.

  • An introduction to Red Hat Insights for Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform

    Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform is a framework for building and operating IT automation at scale. The platform includes many of the tools you’ll need to implement automation across your organization, allowing you to simplify and centralize control of your infrastructure. Ansible Automation Platform includes a visual dashboard, role-based access control (RBAC) and automation tools, including Red Hat Insights for Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform.

  • 20 years of Red Hat Product Security: The rise of branded exploits (Part 2)

    In part 1 of this story we traced the history of Red Hat Product Security from its inception in 2001 through to its shift into the Customer Experience and Engagement (CEE) team in 2013. But that was just the beginning...security was always important, of course, but it was about to become front-page news.

  • CentOS Community Newsletter: December 2021

    As we approach the end of 2021, I wanted to thank all of you who have worked so hard this year towards the betterment of the project. This year we've made governance more transparent, welcomed several new SIGs, made big strides in consolidating infrastructure with Fedora where it made sense, and begun to return to in-person events. We could not have done this without the passion and hard work of the project community. Thank you.