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November 2016

Good News for Jolla (Linux)

Filed under
Linux

Canonical offers direct Docker support to Ubuntu users

Filed under
Ubuntu

Enterprise Ubuntu users running Docker in production now have a new source for Docker support: from Canonical.

Earlier today, Canonical and Docker announced joint support for the commercial edition of Docker Engine on Ubuntu. The pair also will provide updates for Docker on Ubuntu through an application delivery system Canonical originally devised.

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Zorin OS 12 Improves Linux Desktop Access for Windows Users

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OS

There is a seemingly endless variety of Linux distributions in the marketplace, each attempting to carve out its own unique market niche. Zorin OS is one such flavor — a desktop-focused Linux distribution with the goal of helping Windows and macOS users to make the transition to Linux. Zorin OS 12, its latest milestone release, became generally available Nov. 18. Among the improvements in the new release is the updated Zorin Desktop 2.0, based on the open-source Gnome Shell. The new desktop provides users with redesigned icons and a new look for windows and navigation. A feature of Zorin worth noting is the ability to configure the desktop using Zorin Appearance, a tool that provides configurable options for layout, theme, fonts and panel display. Zorin OS also aims to help make the transition from Windows easier by directly integrating the Wine software compatibility layer, which enables many different types of Windows applications to run natively on Linux. Additionally, the included PlayOnLinux tool provides Zorin OS users with a menu of games, internet and office applications that can be installed easily. This slide show covers some of the key highlights of the Zorin OS 12 release.

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SUSE buys HPE’s OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets

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SUSE

SUSE, which probably is best known for its Linux distribution, has long been a quiet but persistent player in the OpenStack ecosystem. Over the last few months, though, the German company has also emerged as one of the stronger competitors in this world, especially now that we are seeing a good bit of consolidation around OpenStack.

Today, SUSE announced that it is acquiring OpenStack and Cloud Foundry (the Platform-as-a-Service to OpenStack’s Infrastructure-as-a-Service) assets and talent from the troubled HPE. This follows HPE’s decision to sell off (or “spin-merge” in HPE’s own language) its software business (including Autonomy, which HP bought for $11 billion, followed by a $9 billion write-off) to Micro Focus. And to bring this full circle: Micro Focus also owns SUSE, and SUSE is now picking up HPE’s OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets.

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Also: SUSE acquires HPE OpenStack and Cloud Foundry assets

Fedora 25 makes Linux easy enough for anyone to try

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Red Hat

When I got the heads-up that Red Hat was readying the release of Fedora 25, it caught my attention like any new release of a major Linux distribution would. But I was in for a pleasant surprise when I went to download a copy of the image.

The first thing to know about the new version of Fedora is that you don’t have to download an ISO file and write it to a USB stick. This is an important thing to note, as preparing installation media for Linux is one of the bigger hurdles for newbies. (When I say newbies, I think of my mom trying to download and properly burn a USB image.)

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NVIDIA GTX 680 To GTX 1080 Blender OpenCL Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For this article are benchmarks of 13 Kepler/Maxwell/Pascal NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards when testing Blender 2.78's OpenCL renderer. Unfortunately, no AMD OpenCL benchmarks for Blender yet -- the current open-source stack doesn't work until ROCm OpenCL support comes into play and the AMDGPU-PRO stack wasn't working for Blender OpenCL but was falling back to CPU rendering.

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Qt Creator 4.2 RC1 released

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KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.2 RC1.

Since the release of the Beta, we’ve been busy with polishing things and fixing bugs. Just to name a few:

We fixed that the run button could spuriously stay disabled after parsing QMake projects.
Qt Creator is no longer blocked while the iOS Simulator is starting up.
We added preliminary support for MSVC2017 (based on its RC).

For an overview of the new features in 4.2 please head over to the Beta release blog post. See our change log for a more detailed view on what has changed.

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Also: Qt Creator 4.2 RC1 Released

First open source RISC-V chips arrive in Arduino board

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OSS

SiFive’s Arduino ready “HiFive1” dev kit features its 320MHz FE310, the first MCU using the open RISC-V ISA. Also, Samsung is rumored to be using RISC-V.

In July, San Francisco-based startup SiFive unveiled the first SoCs based on the open source RISC-V platform: A Linux-ready octa-core Freedom U500 and a FreeRTOS-based Freedom E300. Now, the company has gone to Crowd Supply to sell an open source, Arduino compatible HiFive1 development board based on the FE300 that it claims is the fastest Arduino compatible in the world, 10 times faster even than Intel’s Arduino 101.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Server Administration

Filed under
Server
  • Outlook.com is still not functioning properly for some Microsoft punters

    Microsoft is still working to resolve "difficulties" faced by its Outlook customers, despite months of complaints about the disappearance of sent emails and 550 Errors.

    A growing number of complaints threads have been posted to Microsoft's questions page regarding Outlook after recent upgrades to the service. They both precede and follow last week's outage, which Redmond's PRs failed to explain to us.

  • OpenStack Becomes a Standard Building Block for NFV

    OpenStack is becoming the de facto standard for infrastructure orchestration for NFV deployment by leading Communications Service Providers (CSPs). CSPs are trading off the challenges of OpenStack implementations (e.g. immature technology and evolving standards) for the benefits of open source and open architectures (i.e. reduced vendor lock-in). Lack of standards for NFV management and orchestration (MANO) remains a leading impediment.

  • The Docker monitoring problem

    You have probably heard of Docker—it is a young container technology with a ton of momentum. But if you haven’t, you can think of containers as easily—configured, lightweight VMs that start up fast, often in under one second. Containers are ideal for microservice architectures and for environments that scale rapidly or release often.

    Docker is becoming such an important technology that it is likely that your organization will begin working with Docker soon, if it has not already. When we explored real usage data, we found an explosion of Docker usage in production: it has grown 5x in the last 12 months.

    Containers address several important operational problems; that is why Docker is taking the infrastructure world by storm.

    But there is a problem: containers come and go so frequently, and change so rapidly, that they can be an order of magnitude more difficult to monitor and understand than physical or virtual hosts. This article describes the Docker monitoring problem—and solution—in detail.

    We hope that reading this article will help you fall in love with monitoring containers, despite the challenges. In our experience, if you monitor your infrastructure in a way that works for containers—whether or not you use them—you will have great visibility into your infrastructure.

  • Keynote: New Requirements for Application Delivery in a Micro-services Application World
  • Kontena Introduces Production-Ready, Open Source Container and Microservices Platform

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How Software Is Helping Big Companies Dominate
    Antitrust deserves the attention it’s getting, and the tech platforms raise important questions. But the rise of big companies — and the resulting concentration of industries, profits, and wages — goes well beyond tech firms and is about far more than antitrust policy. In fact, research suggests that big firms are dominating through their use of software. In 2011, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen declared that “software is eating the world.” Its appetizer seems to have been smaller companies. [...] This model, where proprietary software pairs with other strengths to form competitive advantage, is only becoming more common. Years ago, one of us (James) started a company that sold publishing software. The business model was to write the software and then sell licenses to publishers. That model still exists, including in online publishing where companies like Automattic, maker of the open source content management system WordPress, sell hosting and related services to publishers. One-off licenses have given way to monthly software-as-a-service subscriptions, but this model still fits with Carr’s original thesis: software companies make technology that other companies pay for, but from which they seldom derive unique advantage. That’s not how Vox Media does it. Vox is a digital publishing company known, in part, for its proprietary content management system. Vox does license its software to some other companies (so far, mostly non-competitors), but it is itself a publisher. Its primary business model is to create content and sell ads. It pairs proprietary publishing software with quality editorial to create competitive advantage. Venture capitalist Chris Dixon has called this approach the “full-stack startup.” “The old approach startups took was to sell or license their new technology to incumbents,” says Dixon. “The new, ‘full stack’ approach is to build a complete, end-to-end product or service that bypasses incumbents and other competitors.” Vox is one example of the full-stack model. The switch from the software vendor model to the full-stack model is seen in government statistics. Since 1998, the share of firm spending on software that goes to pre-packaged software (the vendor model) has been declining. Over 70% of the firms’ software budgets goes to code developed in-house or under custom contracts. And the amount they spend on proprietary software is huge — $250 billion in 2016, nearly as much as they invested in physical capital net of depreciation.
  • Metsä Wood - Open Source Wood Winner: ClipHut Structural Building System
  • Shutting the open sauce bottle
    While open source software has revolutionised the enterprise software world, a few people are starting to wonder if its very nature will survive the age of the cloud. The concept that software can be used by pretty much anyone for pretty much anything is causing its developers big problems in the era of distributed cloud computing services. Two open-source software companies have decided to alter the licences under which some of their software is distributed, with the expressed intent of making it harder -- or impossible -- for cloud computing providers to offer a service based around that software.
  • How do we handle and use such enormous amounts of data?
    How many gigabytes of data did we (the people of Earth) create yesterday? ...brain. is. thinking... More than 2.5 billion! And it's growing. Yes, it's hard for us to wrap our human brains around it. So, the question the Command Line Heros podcast deals with this week is: How do we handle and use such enormous amounts of data?
  • Security updates for Tuesday

Linux Leftovers

  • Sorry, Linux. Kubernetes is now the OS that matters [Ed: Mac Asay does't know what an operating system is. This is what happens when people with a law degree write about technology. And he trolls Linux for clicks.]
  • Clear Linux Making Progress With Encrypted Installations
    One of the features I've personally been looking forward to is the official support for encrypted installations with Clear Linux. While many don't view it as a particular desktop distribution, it does have all of the packages I personally need for my main production system. So I've been wanting to see how well it could work out as my main desktop OS and to chronicle that experience. Having official support for encrypted installations has been one of the last blockers for my requirements. You can currently setup Clear on an encrypted installation manually, but for simplicity and wanting to keep to the "official" installation routes, I've been waiting for them to officially support encrypted installs... Especially in this day and age, anyone installing a desktop Linux distribution particularly on a mobile/laptop/ultrabook should really be doing a full-disk encryption.
  • The Linux Throwie: A Non-Spacefaring Satellite
    Throwies occupy a special place in hardware culture — a coin cell battery, LED, and a magnet that can be thrown into an inaccessible place and stick there as a little beacon of colored light. Many of us will fondly remember this as a first project. Alas, time marches inevitably on, and launching cheerful lights no longer teaches me new skills. With a nod to those simpler times, I’ve been working on the unusual idea of building a fully functional server that can be left in remote places and remain functional, like a throwie (please don’t actually throw it). It’s a little kooky, yet should still deliver a few years of occasional remote access if you leave it somewhere with sunlight.
  • OnePlus To Launch 5G Phone In 2019; $100 Costlier Than OnePlus 6T
  • OnePlus Releases OxygenOS Open Beta 7, OnePlus Roaming Launched
    Chinese company OnePlus has released the new OxygenOS Open Beta 7 for its OnePlus 6 smartphone, which has introduced several updates and features.

OSS: Development and Conferences

  • Give your students edit access to their course syllabus
    I wanted to give students more agency in their learning. So I let them make pull requests against the syllabus. [...] This exercise was a learning experience for both my students and me, as we clearly had different visions of what constituted a "disruption." While we all agreed that students should pay attention to the instructor and engage in all classroom activities, students thought they should be able to take "important" calls during class time and that texting during class was acceptable. I thought that cell phones should be turned off entirely during class. Students also thought that leaving the classroom to get a drink without asking permission was acceptable, while I thought that they should handle thirst needs before or after class. This resulted in a discussion about professionalism and the expectations associated with college-level work. We discussed what constituted a distraction and agreed that making sounds, whispering, and talking in class all counted as distractions. This in turn led to a discussion of the impacts distractions can have on a learning environment and the importance of paying attention in class. We also explored the impact various learning technologies can have on a classroom—for example, the tools students with disabilities require to fully participate in class, such as a screen reader—and agreed that noise generated by these was acceptable under the policy we intended to construct.
  • Open source tools to consider for your RESTful APIs
    At the start of a RESTful API development project, a software team might be tempted to buy an expensive commercial API management tool when an open source tool can just as easily do the trick. In fact, there are plenty of open source tools that can help with each stage of the API lifecycle and help get an API development program off the ground at low cost.
  • London Perl Workshop

    As london.pm celebrates its 20th anniversary, join Katherine Spice in conversation with a panel of the group's former leaders.

  • GNOME at Capitole du Libre 2018
    Last Saturday and Sunday I went to the Capitole du Libre 2018 to animate the GNOME booth and help on the Purism one.
  • Find Out the Visa Requirements to Attend oSC19
    For people planning on attending the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26, there are certain requirements necessary to receive a visa for those who are not a citizen of a Schengen country.

Red Hat/IBM: OpenShift and Ansible, RHEL Updates