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October 2016

Slovakia: 40% ICT systems to use open source by 2020

Filed under
OSS

By 2020, 40% of public administration ICT systems in Slovakia should use open source software. The target for open source is part of the country’s ICT architecture, which was updated in September.

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FreeBit, KazTransCom and Turkcell adopt Red Hat OpenStack Platform to improve agility, flexibility and efficiency

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Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc. a provider of open source solutions, reports that communications leaders from around the world, including FreeBit, KazTransCom and Turkcell have deployed Red Hat OpenStack Platform, a highly scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution, as the foundation for their modern cloud initiatives.

In a world driven by the growth of digital services, new devices, and massive user numbers, communications leaders around the world are modernising their infrastructures to support advanced cloud services and improve the speed at which new services can be created.

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Ubuntu vs ChromeOS Work Flows

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

In recent months, I've had the opportunity to dive into work flows between your typical Chromebook and an Ubuntu-based PC. This article will offer a comparison of the different work flows between the two Ubuntu and ChromeOS. We'll examine common work flows like printing, scanning, word processing, email, among other tasks.

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Kanika Murarka: How do you Fedora?

Filed under
Red Hat

Murarka first got involved with Fedora after meeting Sumantro Mukherjee. Sumantro, who was a Red Hat intern, told her about the pathway to to contribute to Fedora. She then started to contribute to Fedora Quality Assurance (QA). Kanika would like to see the participation of women in Fedora grow. She would like to help bring SIGs to universities that help women become contributors to Fedora. Kanika was impressed with how easy it was for “new contributor to get involved in the Fedora Project.” Murarka describes the Fedora community as “one of the most diverse community projects”.

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Linux 4.8.6

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.6 kernel.

All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.8.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Also: Linux 4.4.29

VMware brings Linux VDI out of obscurity with Horizon for Linux

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Linux

VMware takes advantage of Sun Microsystems' loss by bringing the once-niche Linux VDI out of the shadows and into the sun with Horizon 7 for Linux.

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If Linux never was: Imagining an alternate reality without Linux

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Linux

What would the world look like right now—all these years later—if Linux were never created? What would our daily lives look like? What actual, real-world impact would the simple act of a penguin not biting a Finnish man have on the lives of people on the other side of the world?

Well, as luck would have it [ahem], we happened to gain access to a (totally real) set of posts from the FriendFace account of a man living in an alternate universe that bears a striking resemblance to the one we just described. I present those to you now—unedited. You’re welcome.

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The (updated) history of Android

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Android

Android has been with us in one form or another for more than eight years. During that time, we've seen an absolutely breathtaking rate of change unlike any other development cycle that has ever existed. When it came time for Google to dive in to the smartphone wars, the company took its rapid-iteration, Web-style update cycle and applied it to an operating system, and the result has been an onslaught of continual improvement. Lately, Android has even been running on a previously unheard of six-month development cycle, and that's slower than it used to be. For the first year of Android’s commercial existence, Google was putting out a new version every two-and-a-half months.

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What Is Linux Kernel?

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Linux

So Linux is 25 years old now. The Linux kernel was created by a Finnish student named Linus Torvalds in 1991 who at the time was a 21-year-old computer science student at the University of Helsinki, Finland . On 25 August 1991, Torvalds posted the following to comp.os.minix, a newsgroup on Usenet-

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more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

More in Tux Machines

The Best Linux Distributions for Old Machines

Do you have an old laptop that has gathered layers of dust over time and you don’t exactly what to do with it? A good place to start would be to install a Linux distribution that will perfectly support its low-end hardware specifications without much of a hassle. You could still enjoy performing basic tasks such as web browsing, word processing, and watching videos, listening to your favourite music to mention a few. In this guide, we feature some of the best Linux distributions that you can install on your old PC and breathe some life into it. Read more

5 tips for making documentation a priority in open source projects

Open source software is now mainstream; long gone are the days when open source projects attracted developers alone. Nowadays, users across numerous industries are active consumers of open source software, and you can't expect everyone to know how to use the software just by reading the code. Even for developers (including those with plenty of experience in other open source projects), good documentation serves as a valuable onboarding tool when people join a community. People who are interested in contributing to a project often start by working on documentation to get familiar with the project, the community, and the community workflow. Read more

5 reasons to run Kubernetes on your Raspberry Pi homelab

There's a saying about the cloud, and it goes something like this: The cloud is just somebody else's computer. While the cloud is actually more complex than that (it's a lot of computers), there's a lot of truth to the sentiment. When you move to the cloud, you're moving data and services and computing power to an entity you don't own or fully control. On the one hand, this frees you from having to perform administrative tasks you don't want to do, but, on the other hand, it could mean you no longer control your own computer. This is why the open source world likes to talk about an open hybrid cloud, a model that allows you to choose your own infrastructure, select your own OS, and orchestrate your workloads as you see fit. However, if you don't happen to have an open hybrid cloud available to you, you can create your own—either to help you learn how the cloud works or to serve your local network. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

  • Linux commands for user management
  • CONSOOM All Your PODCASTS From Your Terminal With Castero
  • Install Blender 3D on Debian 10 (Buster)
  • Things To Do After Installing openSUSE Leap 15.2
  • GSoC Reports: Fuzzing Rumpkernel Syscalls, Part 2

    I have been working on Fuzzing Rumpkernel Syscalls. This blogpost details the work I have done during my second coding period.

  • Holger Levsen: DebConf7

    DebConf7 was also special because it had a very special night venue, which was in an ex-church in a rather normal building, operated as sort of community center or some such, while the old church interior was still very much visible as in everything new was build around the old stuff. And while the night venue was cool, it also ment we (video team) had no access to our machines over night (or for much of the evening), because we had to leave the university over night and the networking situation didn't allow remote access with the bandwidth needed to do anything video. The night venue had some very simple house rules, like don't rearrange stuff, don't break stuff, don't fix stuff and just a few little more and of course we broke them in the best possible way: Toresbe with the help of people I don't remember fixed the organ, which was broken for decades. And so the house sounded in some very nice new old tune and I think everybody was happy we broke that rule.