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October 2015

Fedora 23 packages now live

Filed under
Red Hat

All the repositories have been updated for Fedora 23, so if you trigger an update, everything should update properly. CUDA enabled programs are still building.

A few notes:

HandBrake has been updated to a pre-release of 1.0 for Fedora 23. Updated x264/x265/FFmpeg libraries should give a speed bost to all encoding operations.
The Spotify 0.9.x repository has been removed. It will never receive updates anymore, and now the 1.x builds are on feature parity, including 32 bit support. If you haven’t upgraded, just do it now.
Nvidia drivers version 358.09 do not yet support X.org driver ABI 20, so you’re probably going to have some lock ups or random issues.
The SteamOS and X-Box replacement driver have been updated to the latest upstream.

Please let me know if you have any upgrade issue.

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GNU Hurd 0.7 & GNU Mach 1.6 Released

Filed under
GNU

Stepping ahead of the Linux 4.3 release is a Halloween release of GNU Hurd 0.7, GNU Mach 1.6, and GNU MIG 1.6.

GNU Hurd 0.7 improves the node cache for the EXT2 file-system code (ext2fs), improves the native fakeroot tool, provides a new rpcscan utility, fixes a long-standing synchronization issue with the file-system translators and other components, and the Hurd code has been ported to work with newer GCC versions and libc.

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Fedora 23 a GO, KDE Not So Much

Filed under
-s

Jan Kurik tonight announced that Fedora 23 is GO for release. An internal RC10 will be created and tested and if no major issues arise, it will be released as Fedora 23 next week. For KDE users it may not be a day for celebration, as Phoronix.com's Michael Larabel reported today that a co-maintainer for KDE in Fedora said that upcoming version 23 is "easily the worse KDE spin we have ever released." Yikes.

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The Importance of Open Source in Root

Filed under
OSS

Root. It’s a word we’re mostly familiar with here. Despite the ever-increasing attempts by Google to make it harder to achieve and use (and most likely this will continue, with the predicted convergence of the heavily locked-down ChromeOS and Android platforms), rooting remains incredibly popular on XDA.

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Linux 4.2 Ubuntu 15.10 HDD Tests: XFS Leads Over EXT4, Btrfs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With recently having picked up four Western Digital Black HDDs, I decided to run some fresh hard drive benchmarks with the most common Linux file-systems to see how the performance compares atop Ubuntu 15.10.

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openSUSE Leap 42.1 Launches November 4, Here's What's New

Filed under
SUSE

Now that the Release Candidate of the forthcoming openSUSE Leap 42.1 GNU/Linux operating system was made available for download and testing during the last two weeks, the time has come to take a look at Leap's most prominent features.

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GNOME's Builder IDE Is Working On Some Big Improvements

Filed under
GNOME

Christian Hergert has shared a blog post with some of his plans for what he hopes to accomplish during the GNOME 3.20 cycle with regard to his GNOME Builder integrated development environment.

GNOME Builder continues to be to GNOME as KDevelop is to KDE. GNOME Builder so far has supported features like extensive inline code completion, quick file access, code assistance, integrated GNOME/GTK document viewing, live markdown previews, and many other features. If you are not familiar with the current state of GNOME Builder, see the GNOME Wiki.

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Rockstor 3.8-9 NAS Solution Has Better Active Directory Integration, S.M.A.R.T. Monitoring

Filed under
Red Hat

Suman Chakravartula has had the great pleasure of informing Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of the Fedora-based Rockstor 3.8-9 Linux operating system, known as an open-source, powerful and smart NAS (Network-attached storage) solution.

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More in Tux Machines

SUSE: YaST Development Sprint 84 and SUSE 'in Space'

  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 84

    The YaST Team finished yet another development sprint last week and we want to take the opportunity to let you all glance over the engine room to see what’s going on. Today we will confess an uncomfortable truth about how we manage the Qt user interface, will show you how we organize our work (or at least, how we try to keep the administrative part of that under control) and will give you a sneak peak on some upcoming YaST features and improvements. Let’s go for it!

  • Lunar Vacation Planning

    HPE, one of SUSE’s most important partners in High-Performance Computing and the advancement of science and technology, is now building NASA’s new supercomputer named “Aitken” to support Artemis and future human missions to the moon. HPE’s “Aitken” supercomputer will be built at NASA’s Ames Research Center and will run SUSE Linux Enterprise HPC (co-located where the Pleiades supercomputer – also SUSE-based – has been advancing research for several years). Aitken will run extremely complex simulations for entry, descent and landing on the moon as part of the Artemis program. The missions include landing the next humans on the lunar south polar region by 2024 (on the rim of the Shackleton crater, which experiences constant indirect sunlight for a toasty -300 degrees Fahrenheit).

today's howtos

Flathub vs. Snap Store: Which App Store Should You Use?

Linux package management has come a long way from the nightmare it used to be. Still, the package managers provided by distributions aren’t always perfect. The Snap and Flatpak formats have made it much easier to install software no matter what distro you’re running. Both Snap and Flatpak files are often available on a given app’s website, but both of these formats have their own centralized marketplaces. Which one is right for you? It’s not an easy question to answer. Read more

GhostBSD 19.09 Now Available

GhostBSD 19.09 has some considerable changes happened, like moving the system to STABLE instead of CURRENT for ABI stability with the integration of the latest system update developed by TrueOS. This also means that current users will need to reinstall GhostBSD unless they were running on the development version of GhostBSD 19.09. GhostBSD 19.09 marks the last major changes the breaks updates for software and system upgrade. Read more