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September 2015

Linux AIO Team Releases an All-in-One ISO Image for Ubuntu 14.04.3 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

We've just been informed by the Linux AIO team, a group of developers that create all-in-one Live ISO images with the hottest editions of a popular GNU/Linux operating system, that they have released Linux AIO Ubuntu 14.04.3 LTS.

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Learning Linux - Lesson Two: How a GNU/Linux OS Works

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Linux

Now that you've learned the basics of Linux and the difference between the Linux kernel and a GNU/Linux operating system, and how to use these terms in a conversation with friends or colleagues so that you know what you're talking about, the time has come to continue our free Linux lessons.

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GNOME 3.18 lands with Google Drive, integrated Linux firmware updates, new apps

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GNOME
Reviews

GNOME 3.18 includes a variety of other improvements. It now supports automatic brightness control, using a light sensor on your laptop to adjust the backlight to save battery life. Multi-touch gestures aren’t just for touch screens anymore—they can be used on a laptop touchpad under the new Wayland graphical server. Selecting, copying, cutting, and otherwise editing text with a touch screen is much improved. Scrolling has been improved, and you can now activate automatic scrolling by right-clicking a scrollbar.

Want to try it yourself? GNOME 3.18 will soon arrive as part of Fedora 23, currently in beta, but scheduled to be released on October 27. Download the Fedora Workstation 23 beta image to try it today.

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Fedora vs. openSUSE vs. Manjaro vs. Debian vs. Ubuntu vs. Mint Linux Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

This six-way Linux distribution comparison is looking at the out-of-the-box performance of this set of popular Linux distributions while using the default package sets and running all tests on the same system. For this comparison an Intel Xeon E5-2687W v3 Haswell system with 16GB of DDR4 memory, 80GB Intel SSD, and AMD FirePro V7500 graphics were used for benchmarking.

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Calculate Linux 15 released

Filed under
Linux

We are happy to announce the release of Calculate Linux 15.

Calculate Linux Desktop, featuring either the KDE (CLD), the MATE (CLDM) or the Xfce (CLDX) environment, Calculate Directory Server (CDS), Calculate Media Center (CMC), Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS), Calculate Scratch Server (CSS) are all available for download.

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Google’s Marshmallow Treats Now on Tap

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Google

Not so many years ago, the introduction of a major new Android release was more like looking six months or more into the future when your phone just might become eligible for upgrade. In the case of the Android 6.0 (“Marshmallow”) update announced yesterday, however, owners of recent Nexus devices can start downloading next week, and those who buy the newly announced Nexus devices -- the LG-made, 5.2-inch, Nexus 5X, and Huawei’s 5.7-inch Nexus 6P -- will feast on Marshmallow when the devices ship in October. The same goes for Google’s newly tipped Pixel-C tablet, due in December (see below). Based on Android 5.0 “Lollipop”, most other major Android devices that run Lollipop should be onboard before the end of the year or early 2016.

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Android now has 1.4bn active users, 300m on Lollipop

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Android

The new official figure for active Android users is up 400 million from the one billion active users it announced in June 2014 and the 900 million it counted in mid-2013.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced the new milestone on Tuesday as the search giant unveiled the new Nexus 5X from LG and the Nexus 6P from Huawei, which both ship with Android Marshmallow 6.0, the latest version of the mobile operating system due for release this week.

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Linux Foundation Study: Open Source Collaborative Code is Worth $5B

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Placing a price tag on Linux and other open source platforms is tough for several reasons. Most obviously, a lot of open source software is available at no charge, which means there's no clear answer to how much people would be willing to pay for it if it cost money. In addition, open code is often shared freely between projects, and some developers are paid for their work by companies while others volunteer their time.

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Is Google's future in television in Chromecast, or is it in Android TVs?

Filed under
Android
Google

Chromecast is officially a thing. What started out as a simple streaming stick two years ago has now become a product that Google can boast about, with 20 million devices sold since launch. And today, we saw not one but two new versions of Chromecast, a video-streaming stick that supports modern Wi-Fi standards and another that now turns home speakers into Wi-Fi-connected, cast-enabled audio devices. Google has kept it at an accessible price — $35 per dongle — and the intent is clear: we're going to be in your living room, one way or another.

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Ubuntu 15.10 Might Get Linux Kernel 4.2.2

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) development cycle is coming to an end and it looks like developers are finally settling down. The last big piece of software in the distro, the Linux kernel, will also enter freeze in just a few days.

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More in Tux Machines

Open Source platforms to now help students

The technical institutes in the State are now asked to use free and open-source software developed by a team, headed by the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD). The MHRD has also promoted their FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education) projects which uses tools so that students can easily use them. Recently, the MHRD made a decision that FOSSEE should be promoted amongst the student community so they can aim at reducing dependency on proprietary software in educational institutions. The MHRD Minister Ramesh Pokhriyal Nishank too took to twitter urging students to use FLOSS tools in various languages to meet academic and research requirements. Read more

today's howtos

  • A guided tour of Linux file system types

    While it may not be obvious to the casual user, Linux file systems have evolved significantly over the last decade or so to make them more resistant to corruption and performance problems. Most Linux systems today use a file system type called ext4. The “ext” part stands for “extended” and the 4 indicates that this is the 4th generation of this file system type. Features added over time include the ability to provide increasingly larger file systems (currently as large as 1,000,000 TiB) and much larger files (up to 16 TiB), more resistance to system crashes and less fragmentation (scattering single files as chunks in multiple locations) which improves performance.

  • Testing the Linux Malware Detect.
  • Kushal Das: Remember to mark drive as removable for tails vm install

    If you are installing Tails into a VM for testing or anything else, always remember to mark the drive as a removable USB drive. Otherwise, the installation step will finish properly, but, you will get errors like the following screenshot while booting from the drive.

  • How to Set DNS Nameservers on Ubuntu 18.04

Security Leftovers

  • NSA Researchers Talk Development, Release of Ghidra SRE Tool

    The National Security Agency released its classified Ghidra software reverse-engineering (SRE) tool as open source to the cybersecurity community on April 4. NSA researchers Brian Knighton and Chris Delikat shared how Ghidra was built and the process of releasing it at Black Hat 2019. Ghidra is a framework developed by the NSA’s Research Directorate for the agency’s cybersecurity mission. It’s designed to analyze malicious code to give security pros a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities in their networks and systems.

  • Linux Is Being Hit with Zero-Day Exploits/ Zero-Day Attacks [Ed: This is not news. If you have a system that is unpatched for months, despite many warnings, it is a risk, no matter the OS/kernel.]

    It was once the popular opinion that Linux was immune to zero-day exploits. However, even before the Equifax exploit, vulnerabilities were found in Linux distributions like Fedora and Ubuntu. In particular, back in 2016, a security researcher discovered that you could exploit a Linux system by playing a specific music file. Then, in 2017, a group of attackers used Struckshock vulnerability to carry on the attack on Equifax. These zero-day attacks are Advanced Persistent Attacks that exploit recently discovered vulnerabilities. Read on to learn more about what are zero-day exploits and how they can affect a Linux system.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and Others Launch Confidential Computing Consortium for Data Security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and others launch Confidential Computing Consortium for data security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use. Established by the Linux Foundation, the organization plans to bring together hardware vendors, developers, open source experts, and others to promote the use of confidential computing, advance common open source standards, and better protect data. “Confidential computing focuses on securing data in use. Current approaches to securing data often address data at rest (storage) and in transit (network), but encrypting data in use is possibly the most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data,” the Linux Foundation said today in a joint statement. “Confidential computing will enable encrypted data to be processed in memory without exposing it to the rest of the system and reduce exposure for sensitive data and provide greater control and transparency for users.”

Linux-driven modules to showcase new MediaTek AIoT SoCs

Innocomm is prepping an “SB30 SoM” with the new quad -A35 MediaTek i300 followed by an “SB50 SoM” with an AI-equipped, octa-core -A73 and -A53 MediaTek i500. Both modules ship with Linux/Android evaluation kits. Innocomm, which has produced NXP-based compute modules such as the i.MX8M Mini driven WB15 and i.MX8M powered WB10, will soon try on some MediaTek SoCs for size. First up is an SB30 SoM due to launch in October that will run Linux or Android on MediaTek’s 1.5GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A35 based MediaTek i300 (MT8362) SoC. In November, the company plans to introduce an SB50 SoM based on the MediaTek i500 (MT8385). Read more