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September 2015

Linux AIO Team Releases an All-in-One ISO Image for Ubuntu 14.04.3 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

We've just been informed by the Linux AIO team, a group of developers that create all-in-one Live ISO images with the hottest editions of a popular GNU/Linux operating system, that they have released Linux AIO Ubuntu 14.04.3 LTS.

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Learning Linux - Lesson Two: How a GNU/Linux OS Works

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Linux

Now that you've learned the basics of Linux and the difference between the Linux kernel and a GNU/Linux operating system, and how to use these terms in a conversation with friends or colleagues so that you know what you're talking about, the time has come to continue our free Linux lessons.

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GNOME 3.18 lands with Google Drive, integrated Linux firmware updates, new apps

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GNOME
Reviews

GNOME 3.18 includes a variety of other improvements. It now supports automatic brightness control, using a light sensor on your laptop to adjust the backlight to save battery life. Multi-touch gestures aren’t just for touch screens anymore—they can be used on a laptop touchpad under the new Wayland graphical server. Selecting, copying, cutting, and otherwise editing text with a touch screen is much improved. Scrolling has been improved, and you can now activate automatic scrolling by right-clicking a scrollbar.

Want to try it yourself? GNOME 3.18 will soon arrive as part of Fedora 23, currently in beta, but scheduled to be released on October 27. Download the Fedora Workstation 23 beta image to try it today.

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Fedora vs. openSUSE vs. Manjaro vs. Debian vs. Ubuntu vs. Mint Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This six-way Linux distribution comparison is looking at the out-of-the-box performance of this set of popular Linux distributions while using the default package sets and running all tests on the same system. For this comparison an Intel Xeon E5-2687W v3 Haswell system with 16GB of DDR4 memory, 80GB Intel SSD, and AMD FirePro V7500 graphics were used for benchmarking.

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Calculate Linux 15 released

Filed under
Linux

We are happy to announce the release of Calculate Linux 15.

Calculate Linux Desktop, featuring either the KDE (CLD), the MATE (CLDM) or the Xfce (CLDX) environment, Calculate Directory Server (CDS), Calculate Media Center (CMC), Calculate Linux Scratch (CLS), Calculate Scratch Server (CSS) are all available for download.

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Google’s Marshmallow Treats Now on Tap

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Google

Not so many years ago, the introduction of a major new Android release was more like looking six months or more into the future when your phone just might become eligible for upgrade. In the case of the Android 6.0 (“Marshmallow”) update announced yesterday, however, owners of recent Nexus devices can start downloading next week, and those who buy the newly announced Nexus devices -- the LG-made, 5.2-inch, Nexus 5X, and Huawei’s 5.7-inch Nexus 6P -- will feast on Marshmallow when the devices ship in October. The same goes for Google’s newly tipped Pixel-C tablet, due in December (see below). Based on Android 5.0 “Lollipop”, most other major Android devices that run Lollipop should be onboard before the end of the year or early 2016.

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Android now has 1.4bn active users, 300m on Lollipop

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Android

The new official figure for active Android users is up 400 million from the one billion active users it announced in June 2014 and the 900 million it counted in mid-2013.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced the new milestone on Tuesday as the search giant unveiled the new Nexus 5X from LG and the Nexus 6P from Huawei, which both ship with Android Marshmallow 6.0, the latest version of the mobile operating system due for release this week.

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Linux Foundation Study: Open Source Collaborative Code is Worth $5B

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Placing a price tag on Linux and other open source platforms is tough for several reasons. Most obviously, a lot of open source software is available at no charge, which means there's no clear answer to how much people would be willing to pay for it if it cost money. In addition, open code is often shared freely between projects, and some developers are paid for their work by companies while others volunteer their time.

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Is Google's future in television in Chromecast, or is it in Android TVs?

Filed under
Android
Google

Chromecast is officially a thing. What started out as a simple streaming stick two years ago has now become a product that Google can boast about, with 20 million devices sold since launch. And today, we saw not one but two new versions of Chromecast, a video-streaming stick that supports modern Wi-Fi standards and another that now turns home speakers into Wi-Fi-connected, cast-enabled audio devices. Google has kept it at an accessible price — $35 per dongle — and the intent is clear: we're going to be in your living room, one way or another.

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Ubuntu 15.10 Might Get Linux Kernel 4.2.2

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) development cycle is coming to an end and it looks like developers are finally settling down. The last big piece of software in the distro, the Linux kernel, will also enter freeze in just a few days.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Enters Final Freeze Ahead of October 17th Release

As of October 10th, the Ubuntu 19.10 release is officially in Final Freeze, the last step of its development stage, which means that only release critical bugs affecting the ISO images or the installers will be accepted in the archives. Release Candidate images are also now available for testing to ensure an uneventful and smooth release. "We will shut down cronjobs and spin some RC images late Friday or early Saturday once the archive and proposed-migration have settled a bit, and we expect everyone with a vested interest in a flavour (or two) and a few spare hours here and there to get to testing to make sure we have another uneventful release next week," said Adam Conrad. Read more

KDE neon 5.17

KDE neon 5.17 is out. You can upgrade your existing KDE neon User Edition install or install fresh from an ISO image or run the Docker image. Featuring Plasma 5.17 it is packed full of new features according to OMG Ubuntu. Read more

Games: The Universim, POSTAL 4: No Regerts, RPCS3, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Games Archive and X-Plane

  • City building god sim 'The Universim' will now let you launch rockets with satellites into orbit

    The Universim is slowly turning into a city building god game truly worth playing, with the Sky High update now available expanding the game into planetary orbit. Being able to actually launch things into space is a stepping stone towards visiting other planets. Currently, the Cosmodrome will allow you to send up Defence Satellites that will enable ground to air defences for your Defence Towers. So now you have a reasonable chance to take down meteors and other threats from space.

  • POSTAL 4: No Regerts released into Early Access, Linux version likely in future

    Running With Scissors are back, with a surprise release of POSTAL 4: No Regerts on Steam and a Linux version is looking likely in future. Naturally, someone posted on Steam to ask about the possibility of Linux support. This is something that happens a lot but here it's a bit different. RWS already supported Linux with multiple previous Postal releases.

  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 is coming along quickly with their August progress report up

    Delayed as usual due to the progress reports being done by contributors, the team working on the PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 have another post up to show off more incredible progress. To start with, they have again changed how they list what games are playable and not with the removal of games that won't work due to servers being shut down. They said even if RPCS3 becomes 100% complete, they wouldn't work unless someone accurately emulated and hosted servers for them. With that in mind, they also did a lot of testing of games that previously only went in-game to see how many are now properly playable. Thanks to all the testing, the Playable category has jumped up to 1,426 titles!

  • Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition arrives on Linux on November 5th

    Feral Interactive have finally confirmed the Linux release date for Shadow of the Tomb Raider after announcing it for Linux back in November last year. They've said today it will officially release as "Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition" on November 5th! Looking around at dates, technically this is the earliest we've seen any of the newer Tomb Raider series arrive on Linux. The first Tomb Raider came to Linux in 2016 after an original 2013 release, with Rise of the Tomb Raider arriving on Linux 2018 after an original 2016 release and we get the final game in the reboot trilogy next month!

  • The Internet Archive website has added another 2,500 MS-DOS games

    Another point scored for game preservation. The Internet Archive have added another 2,500 MS-DOS games you can play right in your browser. In their official announcement, they said that while they've added a few more to their collection here and there this is the biggest yet and it ranges from "tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago".

  • 2,500 More MS-DOS Games Playable at the Archive

    Another few thousand DOS Games are playable at the Internet Archive! Since our initial announcement in 2015, we’ve added occasional new games here and there to the collection, but this will be our biggest update yet, ranging from tiny recent independent productions to long-forgotten big-name releases from decades ago.

  • Vulkan support is not far away now for the flight sim X-Plane 11, physics & flight model updates coming

    X-Plane 11, the detailed flight simulator is finally closing in on an update that will bring in Vulkan support as detailed in a new developer blog post.

7 Linux Applications You Should Start Using Right Now

Linux used to be the go-to operating system among the tech-savvy crowd. Because back in the day, it was a lot more demanding to use. Now Linux has modern, user-friendly distributions such as Ubuntu and Mint. The application repository they have in common has matured too. Customizing it to your heart’s desire is now easier than ever before. And this should be the end goal — to mold the OS into a tool that’s custom-tailored to your needs. So if you haven’t already, consider installing the following types of applications. Read more