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July 2015

Open-Source CMSs Appeal To Control-Oriented Media

Filed under
OSS
Web

Snubbed by local media in their infancy for being too rudimentary, news outlets are taking a growing interest in using open-source content management systems like WordPress and Drupal.

Media companies’ tech execs say they like the open-source CMS platforms because the software now offers all the extras and options that managed CMS platforms do, while also allowing them more creativity and control.

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Also: Execs from Kentico and HIPPO debate pros and cons of open source CMS

Jahia Provides Open Source User Experience Platform to Samsung Subsidiaries as a Global Platform Partner

Fedora's Rawhide Kernel Adds In KDBUS Support, Ready For Testing

Filed under
Red Hat

Lennart Poettering announced today that KDBUS is now in Rawhide. "Josh [Boyer] thankfully added it to the Rawhide kernel packages, and our systemd RPMs come with built-in support, too now. If you are running an up-to-date Rawhide system adding "kdbus=1" to your kernel command line is hence everything you need to run kdbus instead of dbus-daemon. (No additional RPMs need to be installed.) If you do, things should just work the same way as before, if we did everything right. By adding or dropping "kdbus=1" to/from the command line you can enable kdbus or revert back to dbus1 on each individual boot."

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Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 6.7

Filed under
Linux

We're happy to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 6 Update 7, the seventh update release for Oracle Linux 6. You can find the individual RPM packages on the Unbreakable Linux Network (ULN) and our public yum repository and ISO installation images are available for download from the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud.

Oracle Linux 6 Update 7 ships with the following kernel packages:

Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) Release 3 (kernel-uek-3.8.13-68.3.4.el6uek) for x86-64
Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) Release 2 (kernel-uek-2.6.39-400.250.7.el6uek) for i386
Red Hat Compatible Kernel (kernel-2.6.32-573.el6) for i386 and x86-64

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Gnumeric 1.12.23 Open Source Spreadsheet Editor Brings Fuzzed File Hardening

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

The development team of the open-source Gnumeric spreadsheet editor software used in numerous GNU/Linux distributions announced the immediate availability for download of Gnumeric 1.12.23.

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Wily Werewolf Alpha 2 Released

Filed under
Ubuntu

The second alpha of the Wily Werewolf (to become 15.10) has now been
released!

This alpha features images for Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE,
Ubuntu Kylin and the Ubuntu Cloud images.

Pre-releases of the Wily Werewolf are *not* encouraged for anyone
needing a stable system or anyone who is not comfortable running
into occasional, even frequent breakage. They are, however,
recommended for Ubuntu flavor developers and those who want to
help in testing, reporting and fixing bugs as we work towards getting
this release ready.

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Samsung docs detail Linux TRIM bug and fix

Filed under
Linux
Security

We've been covering a report from search provider Algolia pointing out a potential issue in Samsung SSDs' TRIM implementation. More recently, Samsung itself reported that the bug actually resides in the Linux kernel, and that the company had submitted a patch for the problem.

Now, we have more details of the bug. Samsung has provided us with internal documents detailing the exact cause of the issue, and the subsequent solution. We're geting a bit technical here, so we'll take some liberty to simplify. When Linux's RAID implementation receives a sequence of read or write operations, it creates separate buffers in memory for each of them.

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Google Play Store/Chrome Web Store

Filed under
Android
Google
Mac
OSS

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • NPR Open Sources "Lunchbox" Tools for Cloud and Social Graphics

    Whether you do some blogging, work as a journalist or just make use of popular social media and cloud computing tools, you probably regularly need to acquire and customize publishable graphics. The good people at NPR are out to make that job easier.

  • 6 top continuous integration tools

    Continuous integration (CI) is an integral part of an agile software development setup. Sprint after sprint, teams strive to "not break the build" while delivering incremental features. But when developers focus completely on adding features, code errors can sometimes creep in and render the software unusable. To stop such errors from being integrated into the software configuration management (SCM), a CI server is the gatekeeper that helps keep a tab on code quality. Even if the code is integrated to SCM, a CI server can quickly tell you what went wrong. In this post, let's take a look at six open source CI server tools that you can use in your agile setup.

  • Now SourceForge For Sale

    After a run of bad publicity and floundering to retain and attract users, parent company DHI today announced SourceForge.net and Slashdot.org are for sale. DHi said the reason was due to a refocus on their employment services. Elsewhere, CoreOS CEO Alex Polvi spoke with InfoWorld.com's Paul Krill about cloud strategies and OpenSource.com wants to know what is your favorite desktop environment.

    It's been a rough year for SourceForge. SourceForge began last Summer by asking users to change their passwords for now reason at all before finally admitting the database had been hacked. Then they were found to be taking over software sources that appeared to have been abandoned and adding spyware into bundled installers. Later projects began fleeing in droves and SourceForge began a campaign to soften their image by reaching out and communicating more with "the community." Today their owner announced the immediate availability of SourceForge.net and as an added bonus, if you dial before midnight tonight, you'll get Slashdot.org too. The announcement said the sale was due to "not successfully [leveraging] the Slashdot user base to further Dice's digital recruitment business." No asking price was given, but DHi paid $20 million for the sites in 2012.

  • Nóirín Plunkett: Remembering Them

    Today I learned of some of the worst kind of news, my friend and a valuable contributor to the great open source community Nóirín Plunkett passed away. They (this is their preferred pronoun per their twitter profile) was well regarded in the open source community for contributions.

  • Getting physical: A $10 device to clone RFID access keys on the go

    A $10 device capable of skimming access cards on the go is soon to be released into the open-source community.

    Radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards are a quick and convenient way for businesses to track as and when their employees are on site, and also act as a way to both restrict and permit access to particular corporate locations. While RFID technology can help secure enterprise offices in this way, the ease in which these access controls can be hacked has hit the spotlight in the form of a tiny device which costs only $10 to make.

  • OpenDaylight Beryllium Takes Shape

    Colin Dixon, Technical Steering Committee Chair (TSC) at the OpenDaylight Project and a Principal Engineer at Brocade, said that the thing he's most proud of during the Lithium release cycle was that it landed on time, without too much pain. He commented that the maturity of the overall project has grown over the last two years, making a stable release cadence possible.

Coverity Report Finds Open Source Code Quality Beats Commercial Code

Filed under
OSS

Synopsys has announced the release of its annual Coverity Scan Open Source Report, which is widely followed. The 2014 report details the analysis of nearly 10 billion lines of source code through the Coverity Scan service and commercial usage of the Synopsys Testing Platform.

For the report, the company analyzed code from more than 2,500 open source C/C++ projects as well as an anonymous sample of commercial projects in 2014. Additionally, the report highlights results from several popular, open source Java and C# projects that have joined the Coverity Scan service since March 2013. Here are findings.

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Also: Coverity Scan Open Source Report Shows Commercial Code Is More Compliant to Security Standards than Open Source Code

More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Mozilla AMO and Reproducible Arch Linux Packages

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (ampache, chromium, djvulibre, firefox-esr, gdal, and ruby-haml), Fedora (chromium, file, gd, hostapd, nspr, and rssh), openSUSE (bcm20702a1-firmware, firefox, gdal, libtomcrypt, php7, python-ecdsa, python3, samba, and thunderbird), SUSE (apache2-mod_auth_openidc, libssh2_org, and rsyslog), and Ubuntu (bash).

  • Security improvements in AMO upload tools

    We are making some changes to the submission flow for all add-ons (both AMO- and self-hosted) to improve our ability to detect malicious activity. These changes, which will go into effect later this month, will introduce a small delay in automatic approval for all submissions. The delay can be as short as a few minutes, but may take longer depending on the add-on file. If you use a version of web-ext older than 3.2.1, or a custom script that connects to AMO’s upload API, this new delay in automatic approval will likely cause a timeout error. This does not mean your upload failed; the submission will still go through and be approved shortly after the timeout notification. Your experience using these tools should remain the same otherwise.

  • Reproducible Arch Linux Packages

    Arch Linux has been involved with the reproducible builds efforts since 2016. The goal is to achieve deterministic building of software packages to enhance the security of the distribution. After almost 3 years of continued effort, along with the release of pacman 5.2 and contributions from a lot of people, we are finally able to reproduce packages distributed by Arch Linux! This enables users to build packages and compare them with the ones distributed by the Arch Linux team. Users can independently verify the work done by our packagers, and figure out if malicious code has been included in the pristine source during the build, which in turns enhances the overall supply chain security. We are one of the first binary distributions that has achieved this, and can provide tooling down to users. That was the TL;DR! The rest of the blog post will explain the reproducible builds efforts, and the technical work that has gone into achieving this.

  • Arch Linux Updates Its Kernel Installation Handling

    Arch Linux has updated the behavior when installing the linux, linux-lts, linux-zen, and linux-hardened kernel options on this popular distribution.  The actual kernel images for their official Linux, Linux LTS, Linux Zen, and Linux Hardened flavors will no longer be installed to /boot by default. By not having the actual kernel reside on /boot should help those with separate boot partitions that are quite small and avoid running out of space when keeping multiple kernels installed. 

Sparky 2019.11 Special Editions

There are new live/install media of Sparky 2019.11 “Po Tolo” Special Editions available to download: GameOver, Multimedia & Rescue. The live system is based on the testing branch of Debian “Bullseye”. GameOver Edition features a very large number of preinstalled games, useful tools and scripts. It’s targeted to gamers. Multimedia Edition features a large set of tools for creating and editing graphics, audio, video and HTML pages. The live system of Rescue Edition contains a large set of tools for scanning and fixing files, partitions and operating systems installed on hard drives. Read more

The Many Features & Improvements of the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Desktop Environment

With the KDE Plasma 5.17 release out the door last month, it's time to take a closer look at the new features and improvements coming to KDE Plasma 5.18, which will be released early next year as the next LTS (Long Term Support) version of open-source desktop environment designed to run on GNU/Linux distributions. Among the enhancements of the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS desktop environment, we can mention the ability to select and remove multiple Bluetooth devices simultaneously, support for KSysGuard to display stats for Nvidia graphics hardware, and a new "Home" button in System Settings that will take users back to the main page. Read more

Open-spec, dual-port router offers a choice of Allwinner H3 or H5

FriendlyElec’s Linux-driven, $20 “NanoPi R1S-H3” router uses a modified version of the Allwinner H3-based NanoPi R1, upgrading the second LAN port to GbE while removing a USB port. There’s also a similar, $23 “NanoPi R1S-H5” with a quad -A53 H5. Back in February, FriendlyElec launched the community-backed NanoPi R1 router SBC, which still sells for $29. Now it has followed up with two more affordable NanoPi R1S routers based on upgraded versions of the NanoPi R1 that that give you dual GbE ports instead of 10/100Mbps and 10/1000/1000Mbps. The mainboards are smaller than the R1 at 55.6 x 52mm, and the board and the case have been entirely redesigned. Read more