Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

June 2015

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Gluster, Ceph storage roadmaps laid out at Red Hat Summit

    During the Red Hat Summit last week, the vendor provided roadmaps for its Ceph and Gluster storage software products including unified management technology and expanded protocol support for Ceph.

    Red Hat demonstrated the new unified capabilities that will allow users to install, manage and monitor Red Hat's Gluster and Ceph storage. Additional capabilities targeted next year for Red Hat Ceph Storage include support for iSCSI and NFS and improved multi-site capabilities, according to Neil Levine, a Red Hat director of product management.

  • Red Hat – Software Partnership Shakes Up Mobile Software Market
  • The open organization on main street
  • Analysts Evaluation on Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) a Buy: Oppenheimer

    According to Wall Street, Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) is expected to report earnings per share for the current fiscal quarter of $0.29. This is the consensus mean estimate based on the individual covering sell-side analysts’ reported numbers. The company last reported earnings for the period ending on 2015-05-31 of $0.31.

  • Call for applications for Fedora Diversity Advisor (A Volunteer Position)

    Fedora is a big community that includes contributors and users from many different countries, each with their own experiences and historical backgrounds that contribute to a diverse mix of cultural, educational, and behavioral norms. To continuously create and foster an inclusive environment in the Fedora community, it’s important to respond to the needs of existing contributors and users, and welcome new contributors and users from diverse backgrounds.

  • Post Filtering

    In order to prevent users from being overwhelmed by a fire hose of notifications from the hubs they’re subscribed to and from all the other apps connected to Fedora Hubs, we decided to design a filtering system.

Btrfs In Linux 4.2 Brings Quota Updates, Many Fixes

Filed under

Adding to the already lengthy list of new features for Linux 4.2 is the Btrfs file-system updates that were sent in today by Facebook's Chris Mason.

The Btrfs file-system update for Linux 4.2 includes sub-volume quota updates, sysfs improvements, device management improvements, and various other changes. In total around 1,700 lines of Btrfs code were touched for this merge window.

Read more

Also: XFS Will Get DAX Support In The Linux 4.2 Kernel

Will Red Hat Enter the Security Market?

Filed under
Red Hat

Security is key part of the open source Linux operating system that Red Hat delivers to its customers. Yet despite the fact that security is baked into the operating system, Red Hat doesn't currently have a separate security offering.

Read more

6 things technical leaders should consider around open-source software

Filed under

Many organisations have a wide array of open-source applications and code in use today – whether it be at the infrastructure and application layers, or in development frameworks and GitHub repositories.

However, the applications developer and infrastructure teams come under increasing pressure as organisations rush to develop new services for customers, comply with growing amounts of industry regulation, or simply strive to meet the needs of the information generation.

Read more

OpenMandriva 2014.2 and openSUSE 42

Filed under

Today in Linux news Kate Lebedeff announced the release of OpenMandriva Lx 2014.2, a major update to 2014.1 released September 2014 and the first to support UEFI. In other news, Douglas DeMaio announced openSUSE 42, the next release of the gecko emblazoned Linux due in November. Elsewhere, Jack Germain reviewed Makulu 9 Aero and Alap Naik Desai reported Friday Microsoft hinted at a Linux OS at Microsoft Ignite in Chicago last month.

Read more

Linux as a lifestyle

Filed under

I'm not going to lie to you, my transformation was not easy. It was a slow and painful process. But after I finished it, it felt like nothing before. Thanks to my stubbornness, I was able to truly embrace open source in my life. I gave some minor contributions to some of the worldly-known open source projects like Reddit and the Tor Project. I'm constantly writing about my open source experience on my blog. I started contributing to and to free software magazine written in Serbian language. I even became a guest blogger to a couple of blogs related to open source and IT in general.

Read more

Plasma 5.3.2 Fixes Your Shutdown Scripts

Filed under

Tuesday, 30 June 2015. Today KDE releases a bugfix update to Plasma 5, versioned 5.3.2. Plasma 5.3 was released in April with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

Read more

More KDE:

  • KStars GSoC 2015 Project

    This year marks my first year as a Google Summer of Code (GSoC) mentor, and it has been an exciting experience thus far. I have been a KStars developer for the last 12 years and it is amazing what KStars has accomplished in all those years.

  • Interview with Livio Fania

    Krita is by far the most complete digital painting tool developed on Linux.

  • GSoC Midterm Update

StackEngine's Boyd Hemphill: How Docker is Changing DevOps

Filed under

“Docker is Linux containers for mere mortals,” Boyd Hemphill is fond of saying. The Director of Evangelism at container application management startup StackEngine organizes Docker Austin meetups, DevOps Days Austin and Container Days events. He has recently given a number of Docker 101 workshops around the country aimed at introducing DevOps professionals to the business advantages of embracing containers and the disposable development environments that they enable.

Read more

The Problem With Putting All the World’s Code in GitHub

Filed under

The ancient Library of Alexandria may have been the largest collection of human knowledge in its time, and scholars still mourn its destruction. The risk of so devastating a loss diminished somewhat with the advent of the printing press and further still with the rise of the Internet. Yet centralized repositories of specialized information remain, as does the threat of a catastrophic loss.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

KDE: KDE Applications 18.04, KDE Connect, KMyMoney 5.0.1 and Qt Quick

  • KDE Applications 18.04 branches created
    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 18.04 release to them :)
  • KDE Connect – State of the union
    We haven’t blogged about KDE Connect in a long time, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve been lazy. Some new people have joined the project and together we have implemented some exciting features. Our last post was about version 1.0, but recently we released version 1.8 of the Android app and 1.2.1 of the desktop component some time ago, which we did not blog about yet. Until now!
  • KMyMoney 5.0.1 released
    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present the first maintenance version 5.0.1 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. Although several members of the development team had been using the new version 5.0.0 in production for some time, a number of bugs and regressions slipped through testing, mainly in areas and features not used by them.
  • Qt Quick without a GPU: i.MX6 ULL
    With the introduction of the Qt Quick software renderer it became possible to use Qt Quick on devices without a GPU. We investigated how viable this option is on a lower end device, particularly the NXP i.MX6 ULL. It turns out that with some (partially not yet integrated) patches developed by KDAB and The Qt Company, the performance is very competitive. Even smooth video playback (with at least half-size VGA resolution) can be done by using the PXP engine on the i.MX6 ULL.

Red Hat Leftovers

Debian Leftovers

  • RcppSMC 0.2.1: A few new tricks
    A new release, now at 0.2.1, of the RcppSMC package arrived on CRAN earlier this afternoon (and once again as a very quick pretest-publish within minutes of submission).
  • sbuild-debian-developer-setup(1) (2018-03-19)
    I have heard a number of times that sbuild is too hard to get started with, and hence people don’t use it. To reduce hurdles from using/contributing to Debian, I wanted to make sbuild easier to set up. sbuild ≥ 0.74.0 provides a Debian package called sbuild-debian-developer-setup. Once installed, run the sbuild-debian-developer-setup(1) command to create a chroot suitable for building packages for Debian unstable.
  • control-archive 1.8.0
    This is the software that maintains the archive of control messages and the newsgroups and active files on I update things in place, but it's been a while since I made a formal release, and one seemed overdue (particularly since it needed some compatibility tweaks for GnuPG v1).
  • The problem with the Code of Conduct
  • Some problems with Code of Conducts

OSS Leftovers

  • Can we build a social network that serves users rather than advertisers?
    Today, open source software is far-reaching and has played a key role driving innovation in our digital economy. The world is undergoing radical change at a rapid pace. People in all parts of the world need a purpose-built, neutral, and transparent online platform to meet the challenges of our time. And open principles might just be the way to get us there. What would happen if we married digital innovation with social innovation using open-focused thinking?
  • Digital asset management for an open movie project
    A DAMS will typically provide something like a search interface combined with automatically collected metadata and user-assisted tagging. So, instead of having to remember where you put the file you need, you can find it by remembering things about it, such as when you created it, what part of the project it connects to, what's included in it, and so forth. A good DAMS for 3D assets generally will also support associations between assets, including dependencies. For example, a 3D model asset may incorporate linked 3D models, textures, or other components. A really good system can discover these automatically by examining the links inside the asset file.
  • LG Releases ‘Open Source Edition’ Of webOS Operating System
  • Private Internet Access VPN opens code-y kimono, starting with Chrome extension
    VPN tunneller Private Internet Access (PIA) has begun open sourcing its software. Over the next six months, the service promises that all its client-side software will make its way into the hands of the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) community, starting with PIA's Chrome extension. The extension turns off mics, cameras, Adobe's delightful Flash plug-in, and prevents IP discovery. It also blocks ads and tracking. Christel Dahlskjaer, director of outreach at PIA, warned that "our code may not be perfect, and we hope that the wider FOSS community will get involved."
  • Open sourcing FOSSA’s build analysis in fossa-cli
    Today, FOSSA is open sourcing our dependency analysis infrastructure on GitHub. Now, everyone can participate and have access to the best tools to get dependency data out of any codebase, no matter how complex it is.
  • syslog-ng at SCALE 2018
    It is the fourth year that syslog-ng has participated at Southern California Linux Expo or, as better known to many, SCALE ‒ the largest Linux event in the USA. In many ways, it is similar to FOSDEM in Europe, however, SCALE also focuses on users and administrators, not just developers. It was a pretty busy four days for me.
  • Cisco's 'Hybrid Information-Centric Networking' gets a workout at Verizon
  • Verizon and Cisco ICN Trial Finds Names More Efficient Than Numbers
  • LLVM-MCA Will Analyze Your Machine Code, Help Analyze Potential Performance Issues
    One of the tools merged to LLVM SVN/Git earlier this month for the LLVM 7.0 cycle is LLVM-MCA. The LLVM-MCA tool is a machine code analyzer that estimates how the given machine code would perform on a specific CPU and attempt to report possible bottlenecks. The LLVM-MCA analysis tool uses information already used within LLVM about a given CPU family's scheduler model and other information to try to statically measure how the machine code would carry out on a particular CPU, even going as far as estimating the instructions per cycle and possible resource pressure.
  • Taking Data Further with Standards
    Imagine reading a book, written by many different authors, each working apart from the others, without guidelines, and published without edits. That book is a difficult read — it's in 23 different languages, there's no consistency in character names, and the story gets lost. As a reader, you have an uphill battle to get the information to tell you one cohesive story. Data is a lot like that, and that's why data standards matter. By establishing common standards for the collection, storage, and control of data and information, data can go farther, be integrated with other data, and make "big data" research and development possible. For example, NOAA collects around 20 terabytes of data every day.Through the National Ocean Service, instruments are at work daily gathering physical data in the ocean, from current speed to the movement of schools of fish and much more. Hundreds of government agencies and programs generate this information to fulfill their missions and mandates, but without consistency from agency to agency, the benefits of that data are limited. In addition to federal agencies, there are hundreds more non-federal and academic researchers gathering data every day. Having open, available, comprehensive data standards that are widely implemented facilitates data sharing, and when data is shared, it maximizes the benefits of "big data"— integrated, multi-source data that yields a whole greater than its parts.