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April 2015

The 11th Release of OpenStack, Kilo, Debuts

Filed under
OSS

The 11th release of OpenStack is available for download today, and the event is being billed as "a turning point" for the open source project with contributions from nearly 1,500 developers and 169 organizations worldwide. Indeed, it's only been a few short years since there was early media coverage of the cloud computing platform.

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Also a death: Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) End of Life reached on April 30, 2015

Plasma 5.4 Plans and Plasma 5.3 for Fedora

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma 5.4 Kicked Off

    Plasma 5.4 is scheduled for August, it’ll be a great addition to Kubuntu 15.10.

  • Plasma 5.3 for Fedora

    Plasma 5.3, new feature release of KDE workspace, has been released on Tuesday and you can get it now on Fedora.

    Plasma 5.3 brings new features, improvements and almost 400 bug fixes for basically all of its components ranging from power management to various applets.

  • KDE 5_15.04 for Slackware-current: back to work

    An update to my KDE 5 packages was overdue. Ever since the “big upgrade” in Slackware-current a week ago on 21 April 2015, there have been some stability issues in the Plasma 5 desktop. The instability was caused by the version bumps of various libraries that the KDE software is depending on – you can not dynamically link to a software library that’s no longer there because it has been replaced with a library bearing a new version number. I felt I had to recompile everything just to be sure there was no hidden “breakage” left, and so I took the opportunity to wait for the newest Plasna release and present you wilth all-new packages.

µQseven COM aims Allwinner A31 SoC at industrial apps

Filed under
Android
Linux

Theobroma’s Allwinner A31 based µQseven COM offers a re-engineered Linux/Android BSP, and adds a security module, SATA, GbE, CAN, eMMC, a USB hub, and more.

Austrian engineering design firm Theobroma Systems has begun selling a “A31 µQ7″ module that expands upon the quad-core, Cortex-A7 Allwinner A31 system-on-chip using a half-size µQseven form-factor. The 70 x 40mm module supports Linux and Android, and offers optional -20 to 70ºC extended temperature support.

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What's what in Debian Jessie

Filed under
Debian

Debian is arguably the most important Linux distribution. From it springs such popular Linux distributions as Mint and Ubuntu. Outside Linux's inner circles, it's not that well known because it's purely a community operating system. There is no company behind it, as there is with Red Hat and CentOS, Fedora, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). Without fanfare, Debian is more than just the foundation for other better known Linux distros, it is a powerful desktop and server Linux in its own right.

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Taking Ubuntu’s Monkey for a Ride

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

That seems to be the response from desktop users and reviewers of Ubuntu’s latest and greatest, 15.04 or Vivid Vervet. The server and cloud crowd are all abuzz, tearing this baby down to see what it can do. But for the desktop folks — not so much. About all you read is that the new desktop is mainly cosmetic changes: that Unity’s color scheme is now purple, which isn’t quite true — to my eyes, there’s some orange in there too — and that a few things have been moved back to where they used to be. Other than that, everyone complains that this vervet is nothing more than lipstick on a unicorn, as Utopic Unicorn was Ubuntu’s last release.

What this means, of course, is absolutely nothing. The folks at Ubuntu have made it clear that this is mostly a server/cloud release, so it’s not surprising that it offers desktop users little reason to upgrade. Besides, except for those few users who insist on living on the bleeding edge, most desktop users should be using 14.04, Trusty Tahr, anyway, because it’ll be supported until 2019, and our vervet friend will only see support through January.

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Ubuntu Ditches Upstart

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is not the first distro to use systemd. Debian (Ubuntu's daddy) recently made the switch too. Other distros have experienced bugs as a result of the switch. For instance, service managers, which configure the boot config files, must be changed to work with the new init system.

Ubuntu cleverly sidestepped this problem by keeping its old init config file formats in place alongside the new format used by systemd. The version of systemd used in Ubuntu can read both. So old tools that work with the Upstart config settings still work.

systemd does provide a boost in boot performance over Upstart, but some members of the community are concerned that the way systemd handles messages to services will reduce performance and even open the door to denial-of-service attacks.

Clearly, Canonical must have a lot of faith in systemd to abandon Upstart (its own project) in its favor. As time passes, we will see whether this was a wise decision.

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The Companies That Support Linux: Fox Technologies

Filed under
Linux

Linux has long been regarded as a stable and secure platform for enterprise applications. And the recent explosion of container technology presents yet another way for developers to build securely on top of Linux, says Mark Lambiase, CTO of Fox Technologies, Inc.

The Linux container model “will provide for the opportunity to separate and segment applications from a shared OS model, which can provide both security and performance/configuration advantages,” Lambiase said.

Fox Technologies, which helps companies manage and maintain Unix and Linux systems with its BoKS ServerControl application, is contributing to such growth and innovation in the Linux ecosystem, in part, by becoming new corporate members of the Linux Foundation. (See the full announcement.)

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As Moore's Law Turns 50, Processor Market Keeps On Innovating

Filed under
Linux

The bottom line, according to TI is that the 66AK2L06 can do almost everything FPGAs can do in data acquisition, but can do it in a way that is cheaper, faster, and more power efficient. The SoC is also claimed to be easier to work with than using FPGAs.

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Simplicity Linux 15.4 Is Based on LXPup and Is Ready for Download

Filed under
Linux

Simplicity Linux, a Linux distribution based on LXPup and that uses the LXDE desktop, has been upgraded to version 15.4 and is now available for download and testing.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Ubuntu: AWS, Podcast, Robotics and Snapcraft

  • Ubuntu Blog: Introducing the Ubuntu AWS Rolling Kernel

    The linux-aws 4.15 based kernel, which is the default kernel in the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS AMIs, is moving to a rolling kernel model. [...] The Ubuntu rolling kernel model provides the latest upstream bug fixes and performance improvements around task scheduling, I/O scheduling, networking, hypervisor guests and containers to our users. Canonical has been following this model in other cloud environments for some time now, and have found it to be an excellent way to deliver these benefits while continuing to provide LTS level stability.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E35 – Feud

    This week we’ve been talking to the BBC about Thinkpads and Ubuntu goes Pro. We round up the news from the Ubuntu community and discuss our picks from the wider tech news. It’s Season 12 Episode 35 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • The State of Robotics – November 2019

    November, for robotics, was a good month. We’re seeing new things develop, current projects finish and more cute animals in our future. So who can complain? The news we’re covering here are things that have crossed our path and that we’ve found interesting. If you have suggestions for next months post or your own projects you would like us to highlight, don’t hesitate to get in touch. Send an email and a brief summary to robotics.community@canonical.com and we can start the discussion. As ever we want this to be a highlight reel for cool robot stuff because we like cool robot stuff. Happy December everyone.

  • Simplifying hardware management during Linux development

    Every few months we release a Snapcraft update, with improvements to both Linux development, and snap user experience. Last week, we released Snapcraft 3.9, and this blog post will focus on the remote build feature that is now a fully accessible preview. Let’s dig deeper into why you need to try remote build, and how you can use it today.

Security: Cyber Security Today, Opportunistic Wireless Encryption (OWE) and Latest Patches

  • Cyber Security Today – An email gift card scam, please stop re-using passwords and more open data found on Amazon storage

    Welcome to Cyber Security Today. It’s Friday December 6th. I’m Howard Solomon, contributing reporter on cyber security for ITWorldCanada.com.

  • NetworkManager Adds Support For Enhanced Open / Opportunistic Wireless Encryption

    Opportunistic Wireless Encryption (OWE) provides a means of encrypting wireless data transfers without having any secret/key. Opportunistic Wireless Encryption is advertised as Wi-Fi Certified Enhanced Open. This OWE / "Enhanced Open" standard is now supported by NetworkManager for allowing supported devices connecting to Linux systems to make use of this means of opportunistic encryption. The Wi-Fi CERTIFIED Enhanced Open has been around just since summer of 2018 to better secure open WiFi networks. More details on the standard can be found via Wi-Fi.org.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (libav), Fedora (kernel, libuv, and nodejs), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (firefox and java-1.7.1-ibm), SUSE (clamav, cloud-init, dnsmasq, dpdk, ffmpeg, munge, opencv, and permissions), and Ubuntu (librabbitmq).

Nordic Semi nRF52832 Powered PineTime Dev Kit is Now Available for $24.99

PineTime was announced as a $25 smartwatch & companion for PinePhone Linux smartphone which itself sells for $150. Read more