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October 2014

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

The First Vivid-Based Ubuntu Touch Image Has Been Released

Filed under
Ubuntu

As I have previously announced, the Ubuntu Touch development branch is based on Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet, while the Ubuntu RTM branch is still using Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn as code base, because it has already received stability improvements and will by default on the first Ubuntu powered Meizu phone. Currently, all the new features are implemented on the Ubuntu-Devel branch, the RTM one receiving only fixes.

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Security-Minded Qubes OS Will Satisfy Your Yen for Xen

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

It has advanced far beyond the primitive proof of concept demonstrated more than four years ago. Release 2 (beta), which arrived in late September, is a powerful desktop OS.

Qubes succeeds in seamless integrating security by isolation into the user experience. However, comparing Qubes to a typical Linux distro is akin to comparing the Linux OS to Unix.

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Sad News! ;-)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

So, XP is dead, “7” is dying, “8” is a zombie, and “10” is vapourware with nowhere to call home. M$ continues layoffs. POOF! It all falls down. In the meantime Google and the OEMs will crank out many millions of ChromeBooks. Canonical, Linpus, RedHat, Suse… and the OEMs will crank out many millions of GNU/Linux PCs. Several OEMs will crank out many millions of GNU/Linux thin clients. Android/Linux will reverberate with another billion or so units of small cheap computers(tablets, smartphones). This looks like good news to me.

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Android creator Andy Rubin is leaving Google

Filed under
Android
Google

The move is, perhaps, not a total surprise. Last March, Rubin left the Android group and was replaced by Sundar Pichai. His latest project, as detailed in a lengthy New York Times report in December, was creating robots for a project outside of the company's Google X lab, something that dovetailed with Google's shopping spree of robotics companies. In 2012, there were also rumors abound that Rubin planned to leave for a stealth-mode startup called CloudCar, though they were vehemently denied.

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NVIDIA's Linux Driver On Ubuntu 14.10 Can Deliver Better OpenGL Performance Than Windows 8.1

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The same Intel Core i7 4770K system used for yesterday's Windows vs. Linux graphics benchmarks were used when benchmarking the GeForce GTX 780 Ti, 970, and 980 graphics cards. Windows 8.1 Pro x64 had all available system updates at the time and was running the NVIDIA 344.48 WHQL binary driver that was their latest release at the time of testing. When running Ubuntu 14.10 x86_64 on the system with its Linux 3.16 kernel, the NVIDIA 343.22 driver was used. The 343.22 driver was the latest publicly available proprietary Linux driver at the time of testing and their first to support the GTX 970/980 under Linux. All of the same hardware was used under each operating system and each OS was with its software default settings as were the driver settings.

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Tizen IVI version 3.0 Milestone M3-Oct2014 has been released

Filed under
Linux

As promised, the Tizen IVI team announced the release of the Tizen IVI 3.0-M3-Oct2014 Release for In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI). The major changes are below:

Improved Modello UI experience
The OS is available in 32-bit and 64-bit backed by a Long Term Support Initiative Linux kernel.
The multi-user application framework has support for single/all-user app deployment scenarios.
Developing applications for Modello is easier than ever using the Tizen_IVI_SDK with support for vehicle webAPIs powered by Crosswalk.
For lower level development Automotive Message Broker (AMB) contains CAN plugin generator tools and a JavaScript engine for rapid plugin prototyping. System resources are now handled by Murphy. MinnowBoard MAX will run this latest instalment of Tizen IVI 3.0 M3 and offers customers an affordable entry-level SDP.

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Linux 3.16.y.z extended stable support

Filed under
Linux

The Ubuntu kernel team is pleased to announce that we will be
providing extended stable support for the Linux 3.16 kernel until
April 2016 as a third party effort maintained on our infrastructure.
The team will pick up stable maintenance where Greg KH left off with
v3.16.7 [1]. Thank you, Greg.

In addition to the Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn" release, the Debian 8
"Jessie" release will also be based on this kernel [2]. Since the
regular support for "Jessie" will go beyond April 2016, after this
date Ben Hutchings (or myself) will continue the Linux 3.16 kernel
maintenance.

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Regain your focus: Manage your push notifications in Linux

I have been working in a professional IT environment of a large organization for over 20 years and during that time I have seen a lot of different visions and opinions on individual and collective productivity. What I have noticed in all those years is how many people think that you are a bad-ass professional if you can do an insane amount of tasks simultaneously. But let’s be honest, doing many things at the same time is not the same as doing things right. But gradually, cracks start to appear in the common opinion that it is always good to multitask. More and more studies show that multitasking undermines focus. And focus is necessary to not waste valuable time due to finding back your concentration as a result of an attention switch. Focus makes sure that you can deliver some high-quality results instead of just many, but probably mediocre results. In this article I want to delve deeper into the backgrounds behind focus, productivity, the impact of notifications on your productivity, and the things that you should consider in allowing and managing your push notifications under Linux. [...] In the introduction I already indicated that nowadays we are increasingly questioning the importance of being good at multitasking, and that perhaps single-tasking is much better. There is, however, a nuance, since multitasking can be fine in itself, as long as all the tasks you want to perform don’t require an equal amount of brain activity and attention. For example, if you like to listen to music during your study time, it is better to listen to instrumental music instead of music in which lyrics play the leading role. With spoken text, you unconsciously interpret and shift your attention from your main task to the music, so you constantly need to refocus back again to your main task. But if you still want to listen to music with vocals, then it is advisable to only listen to music that you have known for years instead of listening to songs with song texts that you have never heard before. New texts subconsciously require more of your attention than texts that you have already known for years. Multitasking is therefore only great when it comes to a combination of simple activities alongside your main task, such as making simple sketches, creating doodles, playing with an elastic band, or chewing your pencil, during a colleague’s presentation or while reading an advice report or listening to a teacher. These doodles and fiddling with a piece of rubber do not require brain effort, so you can keep all your real focus on the main task. But constantly looking at your messages on your mobile phone while listening to a presentation of your colleague, will lead to a loss of focus and loss of information, and of course this is not the nicest and most respectful thing to do in front of a presenting colleague. Read more

Android Leftovers

Access an independent, uncensored version of Planet Debian

Please update your bookmarks and RSS subscriptions to use the new links / feeds below. A number of differences of opinion have emerged in the Debian Community recently. People have expressed concern about blogs silently being removed from Planet Debian and other Planet sites in the free software universe. These actions hide the great work that some Debian Developers are doing and undermines our mutual commitment to transparency in the Debian Social Contract. Read more