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September 2014

FPGA-enabled vision system uses USB3 cams, runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

NI unveiled a fanless, rugged vision computer that runs NI Linux on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers an FPGA and support for 350MB/s USB3 Vision cameras.

National Instruments (NI) has delivered its NI Linux Real-Time OS on a variety of embedded industrial computers and control systems, including its recent CompactRIO 4-slot Performance Controller. Now, the company is applying NI Linux to machine vision with its new USB3 Vision compatible NI CVS-1459RT.

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Fedora Might Try A New Scheduling Strategy For Its Releases

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Red Hat

It's no secret that Fedora has had a challenging time sticking to their release schedules for a long time. With taking care of blocker bugs, Fedora Linux releases tend to frequently slip -- with Fedora 21 it's about two months behind schedule and we're just past the alpha stage. By the time Fedora 21 actually ships, Fedora 20 will have been at least twelve months old. However, a new release scheduling strategy might be tried starting with Fedora 22.

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Debian Jessie Might Get Rid Of The kFreeBSD Port

Filed under
Debian
BSD

For years there's been the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD port that ships the same Debian GNU user-land as Debian GNU/Linux but replaces the Linux kernel with that of the FreeBSD kernel.

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Small firms and open-source software put Spine back into NHS after IT fiasco

Filed under
OSS

Without the fuss and delays that have plagued so many large government IT projects, a key part of the NHS digital infrastructure was recently migrated and updated in a single weekend.

The collection of applications and directory services known as the Spine connects clinicians, patients and local services to core NHS services such as the GP2GP patient record transfer, the Electronic Prescription Service, patients' Summary Care Records, and the Choose and Book service. More than 250,000 health service staff connect to it every day, sending more than 400m messages each month.

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Scribbleton Has a Ton of Potential

Filed under
Software

Scribbleton is a very infant -- as in alpha -- release of an innovative note-taking app for Linux that provides cross-platform access with Windows and Apple computers.

It creates a personal wiki for storing everything from quick notes to detailed checklists to outlines. It creates links between pages in Scribbleton. Think of this as an easy-to-use database to create links between words, phrases and pages. You can just as easily use Scribbleton to store snippets or volumes of text and quickly locate cross-referenced information.

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Apache Storm is ready for prime time

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OSS

What do you do when you have terabytes and more of data and you want to work it with in real time? Well, one solution is to turn to Apache Storm.

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Linux Foundation Announces Major Network Functions Virtualization Project

Filed under
Linux

The project is launching with thirty-eight founding companies, including many of the largest IT companies in the world. Importantly, they include not only cloud and service infrastructure vendors, but telecom service providers, developers and end users as well. (Disclosure: my firm and I represent the Linux Foundation and OPNFV).

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AMD Catalyst 14.9 Linux Driver Is Out, Release Disappoints, as Usual

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The AMD developers have announced that a new Catalyst 14.9 Linux driver is now out and that it brings support for a couple of new operating systems and a few bug fixes.

New AMD Linux drivers don't arrive as often as the community wants or needs them and the company doesn't have the best track record in the open source world. As it stands right now, there are two kinds of drivers available to Linux users, one that's open source and another one that's proprietary. Catalyst 14.9 is made by AMD and provides better functionality than the open source one, but it doesn't get updated too often.

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Calibre for Linux Review – The Best App for Anything Related to eBooks

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Calibre is the premiere application on the Linux platform to convert, edit, view, and download eBooks. It has so many features it would be difficult just to count them all, but it's time to take a closer look at this app and see what changed in the years that passed since our last review.

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Operating System U Fails To Live Up To Its Goals

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After launching last month on Kickstarter, the project has turned into a failure and all development has ceased. Operating System U by Andrew Bernstein only raised $1,948 of its $50,000 goal over the month-long period for the OS that claimed numerous advantages over Ubuntu and Windows 8. Andrew then posted, "Unfortunately OS U was unsuccessful. I truly, truly appreciate everyone who backed us, but unfortunately since we where unsuccessful, combined with other circumstances, OS U will not have any more continued development."

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More in Tux Machines

Open Source platforms to now help students

The technical institutes in the State are now asked to use free and open-source software developed by a team, headed by the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD). The MHRD has also promoted their FOSSEE (Free and Open Source Software for Education) projects which uses tools so that students can easily use them. Recently, the MHRD made a decision that FOSSEE should be promoted amongst the student community so they can aim at reducing dependency on proprietary software in educational institutions. The MHRD Minister Ramesh Pokhriyal Nishank too took to twitter urging students to use FLOSS tools in various languages to meet academic and research requirements. Read more

today's howtos

  • A guided tour of Linux file system types

    While it may not be obvious to the casual user, Linux file systems have evolved significantly over the last decade or so to make them more resistant to corruption and performance problems. Most Linux systems today use a file system type called ext4. The “ext” part stands for “extended” and the 4 indicates that this is the 4th generation of this file system type. Features added over time include the ability to provide increasingly larger file systems (currently as large as 1,000,000 TiB) and much larger files (up to 16 TiB), more resistance to system crashes and less fragmentation (scattering single files as chunks in multiple locations) which improves performance.

  • Testing the Linux Malware Detect.
  • Kushal Das: Remember to mark drive as removable for tails vm install

    If you are installing Tails into a VM for testing or anything else, always remember to mark the drive as a removable USB drive. Otherwise, the installation step will finish properly, but, you will get errors like the following screenshot while booting from the drive.

  • How to Set DNS Nameservers on Ubuntu 18.04

Security Leftovers

  • NSA Researchers Talk Development, Release of Ghidra SRE Tool

    The National Security Agency released its classified Ghidra software reverse-engineering (SRE) tool as open source to the cybersecurity community on April 4. NSA researchers Brian Knighton and Chris Delikat shared how Ghidra was built and the process of releasing it at Black Hat 2019. Ghidra is a framework developed by the NSA’s Research Directorate for the agency’s cybersecurity mission. It’s designed to analyze malicious code to give security pros a better understanding of potential vulnerabilities in their networks and systems.

  • Linux Is Being Hit with Zero-Day Exploits/ Zero-Day Attacks [Ed: This is not news. If you have a system that is unpatched for months, despite many warnings, it is a risk, no matter the OS/kernel.]

    It was once the popular opinion that Linux was immune to zero-day exploits. However, even before the Equifax exploit, vulnerabilities were found in Linux distributions like Fedora and Ubuntu. In particular, back in 2016, a security researcher discovered that you could exploit a Linux system by playing a specific music file. Then, in 2017, a group of attackers used Struckshock vulnerability to carry on the attack on Equifax. These zero-day attacks are Advanced Persistent Attacks that exploit recently discovered vulnerabilities. Read on to learn more about what are zero-day exploits and how they can affect a Linux system.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and Others Launch Confidential Computing Consortium for Data Security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use.

  • Intel, Google, Microsoft, and others launch Confidential Computing Consortium for data security

    Major tech companies including Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Google Cloud, Microsoft, and Red Hat today announced intent to form the Confidential Computing Consortium to improve security for data in use. Established by the Linux Foundation, the organization plans to bring together hardware vendors, developers, open source experts, and others to promote the use of confidential computing, advance common open source standards, and better protect data. “Confidential computing focuses on securing data in use. Current approaches to securing data often address data at rest (storage) and in transit (network), but encrypting data in use is possibly the most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data,” the Linux Foundation said today in a joint statement. “Confidential computing will enable encrypted data to be processed in memory without exposing it to the rest of the system and reduce exposure for sensitive data and provide greater control and transparency for users.”

Linux-driven modules to showcase new MediaTek AIoT SoCs

Innocomm is prepping an “SB30 SoM” with the new quad -A35 MediaTek i300 followed by an “SB50 SoM” with an AI-equipped, octa-core -A73 and -A53 MediaTek i500. Both modules ship with Linux/Android evaluation kits. Innocomm, which has produced NXP-based compute modules such as the i.MX8M Mini driven WB15 and i.MX8M powered WB10, will soon try on some MediaTek SoCs for size. First up is an SB30 SoM due to launch in October that will run Linux or Android on MediaTek’s 1.5GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A35 based MediaTek i300 (MT8362) SoC. In November, the company plans to introduce an SB50 SoM based on the MediaTek i500 (MT8385). Read more