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November 2013

Linux Mint 16 'Petra' Cinnamon, MATE editions released

Filed under
Linux

The team took 6 months to work on the Linux Mint 16 Petra and is basically an incremental development over the latest and greatest Linux open source technologies. Some of the improvements in Linux Mint 16 are related to Login Screen, USB Stick support, software manager, performance, artwork and system improvements, and improvement to the main components.

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Linux 3.13, NVIDIA GPUs Won Over November

Filed under
Linux

...this year on Phoronix I alone have written 236 full-length articles and 2,637 news articles on top of my full-time development work on Phoronix Test Suite and its commercial arm and my other business ventures.

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GNOME Music 3.11.2 Adds Pep8 Compatibility

Filed under
Software

The GNOME development team is hard at work these days, preparing the upcoming GNOME 3.12 desktop environment. GNOME Music is a new app introduced along with the GNOME 3.10 release, and this new development version introduces several new features and fixes bugs.

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KDE's Painting/Image Program Now Uses OpenGL 3.0

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KDE

Krita is KDE's painting and image editing program that soon will see its v2.8 release. With this next Krita release there is new usage of OpenGL 3.x within the open-source program. Under the high quality filtering mode, OpenGL 3.0 is now used for delivering a superior painting/imaging experience.

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Valve and Linux may defeat Microsoft and Sony in console gaming

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Linux

Expectations have certainly become high for Valve's Steam Machines. Softpedia thinks that Valve could indeed defeat Microsoft and Sony in console gaming.

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today's howtos

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HowTos

$499 Gaming Console Based on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Several years ago it seemed like the dream of GNU/Linux as a gaming platform was elusive, especially after Sony had stabbed GNU/Linux users (on PS3) in their backs. Seeing a sort of comeback — where major games are ported to GNU/Linux faster than we can keep track of and consoles are launched which are based on GNU/Linux — is a truly refreshing change that will definitely accompany the ascent of the Free desktop. No more will “gaming” be an excuse for avoiding GNU/Linux as a desktop platform.

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Free Software Foundation encourages shoppers to 'Give Freely' with new Giving Guide

Filed under
Gadgets

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced its 2013 Giving Guide, a resource for conscientious shoppers looking for geeky gifts that respect users' freedom. Many holiday shoppers will be turning to gadgets and online services as gifts for friends and family, but these gifts are often rife with proprietary software, anti-features, or Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), all of which restrict how the gift can be used.

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KDE Developer Missing, Linux Reviews, and Lightweight Distros

Filed under
Linux

Some interesting headlines have jumped out of the RSS reader in the last couple of days. Phoronix.com reported that a KDE developer is missing jeopardizing the whole Kdenlive project. The new OpenMandriva and openSUSE releases received reviews. And MakeTechEasier.com has a rundown of "Distros for Old Computers."

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Today in Techrights

Filed under
Linux

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • A beginner's guide to developing with React | Opensource.com

    React is a JavaScript user interface (UI) library that was built and is maintained by Facebook. React helps JavaScript developers think logically and functionally about how they want to build a UI.

  • DOM Recording For Web Application Demos

    To show off the power of our Pernosco debugger, we wanted many short demo videos of the application interface. Regular videos are relatively heavyweight and lossy; we wanted something more like Asciinema, but for our Web application, not just a terminal. So we created DOMRec, a DOM recorder.

  • The 20 Best Kotlin Books for Beginner and Expert Developers

    Here you will find the top Kotlin books that will make it very interesting and almost effortless for you to learn Kotlin. Kotlin is a statically composed, universally useful programming language with type deduction. It is also a cross-platform language. Kotlin is intended to engage completely with Java, and Kotlin’s standard library’s JVM variant relies upon the Java Class Library. However, Kotlin’s type of derivation permits its syntax to be more compact and precise. Therefore, it has become quite crucial to learn Kotlin these days. But to learn it in the shortest number of days, a perfect set of Kotlin books is indecipherably important. Whether or not to pick Kotlin or Java for new advancement has been coming up a ton in the Android people group since the Google I/O declaration. The short answer is that Kotlin code is more secure and more succinct than Java code and that Kotlin and Java records can coincide in Android applications, so Kotlin isn’t just valuable for new applications but also for growing existing Java applications as well.

  • What the Error Handling Project Group is Working On

    The Rust community takes its error handling seriously. There’s already a strong culture in place for emphasizing helpful error handling and reporting, with multiple libraries each offering their own take (see Jane Lusby’s thorough survey of Rust error handling/reporting libraries). But there’s still room for improvement. The main focus of the group is carrying on error handling-related work that was in progress before the group's formation. To that end, we're working on systematically addressing error handling-related issues, as well as eliminating blockers that are holding up stalled RFCs. Our first few meetings saw us setting a number of short- and long-term goals. These goals fall into one of three themes: making the Error trait more universally accessible, improving error handling ergonomics, and authoring additional learning resources.

  • How to collect Rust source-based code coverage

    Source-based code coverage was recently introduced in Rust. It is more precise than the gcov-based coverage, with fewer workarounds needed. Its only drawback is that it makes the profiled program slower than with gcov-based coverage. In this post, I will show you a simple example on how to set up source-based coverage on a Rust project, and how to generate a report using grcov (in a readable format or in a JSON format which can be parsed to generate custom reports or upload results to Coveralls/Codecov).

Audiocasts/Shows/Videos: Feren OS, A First Look At Garuda Linux KDE "Dr4Gonized", and Trolling Linux

Free Software: Curl, DOSEMU2, SFC, BookStack and Hantro

  • Daniel Stenberg: The curl web infrastructure

    The purpose of the curl web site is to inform the world about what curl and libcurl are and provide as much information as possible about the project, the products and everything related to that. The web site has existed in some form for as long as the project has, but it has of course developed and changed over time.

  • DOSEMU2

    Since I have the original DOSEMU working, I'm not going to attempt to install DOSEMU2 at this time. (Especially as I'd have to build from source; precompiled packages for Debian are not provided.) But I'm glad to hear that someone has "forked" the DOSEMU project and is continuing maintenance and development, since the original DOSEMU seems to have been frozen in mid-2013.

  • Generous Match Challenge from Individual Conservancy Supporters for Annual Fundraiser

    We are pleased to launch our annual fundraiser today with a match challenge of $111,029. This match is extremely exciting (not only because it is a prime number for the second year but also) because the pledges comes entirely from individuals (not companies!) who care deeply about software freedom. The bulk of this match challenge was provided by one very generous donor who prefers to remain anonymous. Their amount was augmented by six Conservancy Supporters (listed alphabetically) who came together to increase the match even more: Jeremy Allison, Kevin P. Fleming, Roan Kattouw, Jim McDonough, Allison Randal and Daniel Vetter. You'll be hearing more about why they joined this year's match donation in interviews on our blog in the coming weeks.

  • BookStack:Collaboratively Create and editor books with your team

    When writing or editing a complex project like a book collaboratively with a team, there are many problems that start from selecting the best tools. The main problem here is there are many tools to choose from and most of them require a time to learn and setup for all team members. Many teams tend to use several tools at once which may conflict with their workflow and takes time to jump from here to there with notes, revisions and content. The best option is to keep the collaborative writing and editing workflow in one place to manage book sections, comments, revisions, images, sorting, search and exports. Wiki engines and collaborative writing tools usually require customization for book editing. Also, it's good to consider the technical knowledge of writers and editors and the time needed to learn how to use the system.

  • Hantro H1 hardware accelerated video encoding support in mainline Linux

    With the increasing need for video encoding, there are some breakthrough developments in hardware-accelerated video encoding for Linux. Bootlin has been working on the implementation of Hantro H1 hardware accelerated video encoding to support H.264 encoding on Linux which follows the company’s work on the previously-released open-source VPU driver for Allwinner processors.

LibreOffice 7.1 Beta1 is available for testing

The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce LibreOffice 7.1 Beta1 is available for testing! LibreOffice 7.1 will be released as final at the beginning of February, 2021 ( Check the Release Plan for more information ) being LibreOffice 7.1 Beta1 the second pre-release since the development of version 7.1 started at the end of May, 2020. Since the previous release, LibreOffice 7.1 Alpha1, 1131 commits have been submitted to the code repository and 245 issues got fixed. Check the release notes to find the new features included in this version of LibreOffice. Read more