Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

September 2013

Tales from Linux Kernel 3.11 Development

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: Jon Masters summarises the happenings in the Linux kernel community around the release of the 3.11-rc1 kernel

Open source snapshot: GhostBSD

Filed under
BSD

techworld.com.au: When it comes to open source desktop operating systems, there's no question that Linux is the top dog in terms of market share. But that's not to say that Linux is all there is. Alongside projects like GNU Hurd, Haiku and others, there is the plethora of desktop-targeted operating systems in the BSD family.

A Mac for a Linux user

Filed under
Linux
Mac

manilastandardtoday.com: IN a recent piece for TechRepublic, Jack Wallen, a longtime Linux advocate, contemplates the purchase of an iMac. As a Linux user myself, I can’t help but agree. But unlike Jack, I switched from Windows to both Linux (on the desktop) and the Mac (on the road) at about the same time, so I had none of the doubts that he entertained.

Open source programs to get more kids to code

Filed under
Software

opensource.com: At OSCON this year, Regina ten Bruggencate and Kim Spiritus gave a talk called How To Get More Kids To Code. I got in late (I was waiting in line to get a free signed copy of The Art of Community by Jono Bacon) so I missed the beginning of this session, but came in as they were demoing Scratch.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 527

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 39th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! This week we talk about some companies who are investing positively in open source in the hope of reaping the rewards. These companies include Valve, a company working on a Linux-based gaming console; NVIDIA, a popular video card manufacturer and Red Hat, a leading developer of enterprise software and sponsor of the Fedora Project.

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Videos about the Freedombox project
  • Turning points and cornerstones 2013
  • Teskeing the Possibilities | BSD Now 4
  • Being on the napkin
  • IBM Releases FusedOS Operating System
  • Temper Pi
  • Open Source Software is Only the Beginning
  • install HPLIP rivers on debian 7.0/7.1
  • Mark My Words, Linux Will Win (w/ steamos)
  • Complex setup with Nvidia Optimus / Nouveau Prime on Fedora 19
  • How to access ssh terminal in web browser on Linux
  • /bin/rm: cannot execute [Argument list too long]
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 5 Episode 17

No One Knows What the Firefox Logo is

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF
  • No One Knows What the Firefox Logo is, and Last Night's Jeopardy! Proved It
  • Slides for my talk at LibreOffice conference
  • Resolving Nightmare Bugs With Reversible Linux App Debugger
  • New Firefox 25 Beta Launched on All Available Platforms
  • Frikin’ Awesome Apps (without AppData)
  • GNOME 3.10 in Fedora
  • Pitch Perfect Penguins
  • Nouveau Keeps Pushing Forward With Improvements
  • Getting Ready for Mozilla Summit 2013; Fun Already!

Is Slackware Right For You?

Filed under
Linux
  • Is Slackware, The Oldest Remaining Linux Distribution, Right For You?
  • Debian Edu / Skolelinux Wheezy — a solution for your school
  • Torvald’s Diplomacy, Elop’s Riches & More…
  • Fedora Linux 20 Gears Up to Be a Big Data Server
  • Partitioning Tool Parted Magic 2013.09.29 Works with UEFI Secure Boot
  • Red Hat Doesn't See SUSE Linux as a Major Competitive Threat

Ryan Gordon: Linux Viable Gaming Platform

Filed under
Gaming
  • Ryan "icculus" Gordon Says Linux Viable Gaming Platform
  • Valve Reveals Steam Machine Controller
  • Nvidia claims SteamOS partnership
  • Making sense of Valve’s Steam Box

Semplice 5 review – High Hopes

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Sometimes I come across a distribution that looks interesting and I want to see how good it is and whether it brings anything new to the table. That’s why I decided to take a quick look at Semplice, a desktop distribution based on the unstable branch of Debian.

More in Tux Machines

Calibre 5.0 Ebook Manager Released with Text Highlighting Support, Dark Mode

Coming almost a year after the Calibre 4.0 series, Calibre 5.0 is here with some major changes. This include the ability to highlight text in the E-book viewer, which is one of the most requested feature for this powerful ebook manager. Users will be able to use colors when highlighting text in ebooks, as well as to use all sorts of text formatting and styles, including strikethrough and underline. In addition, you can even add notes to your highlights. All the highlights will be stored in the respective EPUB file, which makes them easy to share. In addition, you can browse all your highlights in the Calibre library using the Browse annotations tool. Read more

Android Leftovers

Compute module and dev kit aim Snapdragon 865 at AR/VR

Lantronix has launched 50 x 29mm “Open-Q 865XR SOM” and $995 dev kit that runs Android 10 on a 15-TOPS NPU equipped Snapdragon 865 with 6GB LPDDR5, 802.11ax, and triple MIPI-CSI interfaces. Intrinsyc, a subsidiary of Lantronix, has introduced an IoT-oriented compute module and development kit based on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 865 (SXR2130P) SoC. The $445 Open-Q 865XR SOM and $995 Open-Q 865XR SOM Development Kit follow Intrinsyc’s more smartphone-oriented Snapdragon 865 Mobile HDK. The Open-Q 865XR targets imaging intensive embedded applications including Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality (AR/VR) applications in AI machine learning, medical, gaming, logistics and retail sectors. Read more

Programming: Git and Qt

  • Understand the new GitLab Kubernetes Agent

    GitLab's current Kubernetes integrations were introduced more than three years ago. Their primary goal was to allow a simple setup of clusters and provide a smooth deployment experience to our users. These integrations served us well in the past years but at the same time its weaknesses were limiting for some important and crucial use cases.

  • GitLab Introduces the GitLab Kubernetes Agent

    The GitLab Kubernetes Agent (GKA), released in GitLab 13.4, provides a permanent communication channel between GitLab and the cluster. According to the GitLab blog, it is designed to provide a secure solution that allows cluster operators to restrict GitLab's rights in the cluster and does not require opening up the cluster to the Internet.

  • Git Protocol v2 Available at Launchpad

    After a few weeks of development and testing, we are proud to finally announce that Git protocol v2 is available at Launchpad! But what are the improvements in the protocol itself, and how can you benefit from that? The git v2 protocol was released a while ago, in May 2018, with the intent of simplifying git over HTTP transfer protocol, allowing extensibility of git capabilities, and reducing the network usage in some operations. For the end user, the main clear benefit is the bandwidth reduction: in the previous version of the protocol, when one does a “git pull origin master”, for example, even if you have no new commits to fetch from the remote origin, git server would first “advertise” to the client all refs (branches and tags) available. In big repositories with hundreds or thousands of refs, this simple handshake operation could consume a lot of bandwidth and time to communicate a bunch of data that would potentially be discarded by the client after. In the v2 protocol, this waste is no longer present: the client now has the ability to filter which refs it wants to know about before the server starts advertising it.

  • Qt Desktop Days 7-11 September

    We are happy to let you know that the very first edition of Qt Desktop Days 2020 was a great success! Having pulled together the event at very short notice, we were delighted at the enthusiastic response from contributors and attendees alike.

  • Full Stack Tracing Part 1

    Full stack tracing is a tool that should be part of every software engineer’s toolkit. It’s the best way to investigate and solve certain classes of hard problems in optimization and debugging. Because of the power and capability it gives the developer, we’ll be writing a series of blogs about it: when to use it, how to get it set up, how to create traces, and how to interpret results. Our goal is to get you capable enough to use full stack tracing to solve your tough problems too. Firstly, what is it? Full stack tracing is tracing on the full software stack, from the operating system to the application. By collecting profiling information (timing, process, caller, API, and other info) from the kernel, drivers, software frameworks, application, and JavaScript environments, you’re able to see exactly how the individual components of a system are interacting. That opens up areas of investigation that are impossible to achieve with standard application profilers, kernel debug messages, or even strategically inserted printf() commands. One way to think of full stack tracing is like a developer’s MRI machine that allows you to look into a running system without disturbing it to determine what is happening inside. (And unlike other low-level traces that we’ve written about before, full stack tracing provides a simpler way to view activity up and down the entire software stack.)