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April 2013

Working with Stdin and Stdout

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Working with Stdin and Stdout
  • Open Build Service version 2.4 released
  • Please, stay away from rebase
  • Hacking on Ubiquity, the setup
  • "Await" in Python

Ubuntu 13.04 Review – Spot the difference

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 13.04 Review – Spot the difference
  • How to Disable Window Effects in Ubuntu 13.04
  • Xubuntu 13.04 Review: Rock solid and stable
  • 13 Reasons to Deploy With Ubuntu Server
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 314

Poll: Which distros would you save?

Filed under
Linux

everydaylinuxuser.com: One of the comments that is quite often made on Reddit and in other Linux forums is that there are a lot of distributions that are just re-spins of Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE etc. Suppose limits, which distributions would you save?

Debian 7.0 Wheezy - my hands on

Filed under
Linux
  • Debian 7.0 Wheezy - my hands on with a pre-release build
  • Lightweight Debian: LXDE Desktop From Scratch
  • Debian developers set to party

why there’s no need for distributions to use the same package format

Filed under
Linux

happyassassin.net: The problem Bryan identifies affects third parties providing Linux applications directly to users: Bryan trying to provide his games to users of different distributions, or Google trying to provide Chrome, or Mozilla trying to provide Firefox, and so on and so forth.

some leftovers:

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Little Black Box Open Source XBMC Media Centre Unveiled
  • Open Source by Default
  • Raspberry Pi Case by SB Components Review
  • Why Open Source Software is Like Burning Man
  • A change in the open source software market

Compromised Apache binaries

Filed under
Software
  • Compromised Apache binaries load malicious code
  • Doomsday Engine on openSUSE
  • Hotshots – Screenshot tool with editing
  • Vim Sessions
  • rekonq 2.3.0 almost ready
  • Strange Puzzle Game "Kairo" Launches on Steam for Linux
  • another opensuse wallpaper
  • dmesg -H is sexy
  • BitTorrent Sync: Painless File Syncing without the Cloud
  • Useful Gimp Keyboard Shortcuts in Debian/Ubuntu
  • Image annotation in GIMP, Dia, and OpenOffice Draw
  • LibreOffice Happy To Work With Coverity Scan Results
  • Stealth Bastard Deluxe Sneaks Onto Linux thru Steam
  • "The 39 Steps" Will Combine Film and Literature

SolydXK Added to Distrowatch Database

Filed under
Linux
  • SolydXK Added to Distrowatch Database
  • Testing Hardware Compatibility with Knoppix on Asus U80A
  • Linux? What's That?? -- Soon No more
  • Windows Blue & Desktop death nonsense
  • Why you should go to a Linux event
  • Confused by FuSE
  • Linux Tweaks for Samsung 535U3C
  • Once again, Linux Fest Northwest nails it
  • List Of Linux Operating System For Ham Radio Operator
  • The new BeagleBone Black and Gentoo
  • Open build service gets a facelift

Compiling your own custom kernel for fun and profit

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

anarchic-order.blogspot: You know that Linux kernel thing, that has thousands of developers from all over the world, some of which do it professionally, most of which do it for the love of solving problems (or something)? I look at it as a great chance for learning.

More in Tux Machines

Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 18.04 and 16.04 LTS

Affecting both the Linux 4.15 kernel used in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04.6 LTS (Xenial Xerus) systems, the new security patch fixed an improperly implemented Spectre mitigation in the ptrace susbsystem (CVE-2019-15902), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. It also addresses a buffer overread (CVE-2019-15918) discovered that the SMB networking file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to expose sensitive information (kernel memory), two flaws (CVE-2019-15117 and CVE-2019-15118) discovered in the USB audio driver that may allow a physically proximate attacker to crash the system, and a flaw (CVE-2019-14821) in the KVM hypervisor implementation that let a local attacker to crash the system. Read more

Leftovers: MX-19, Versalogic and Security

  • MX-19 “patito feo” released!

    We are pleased to offer MX-19 for your use. As usual, this iso includes the latest updates from debian 10.1 (buster), antiX and MX repos.

  • Compact Apollo Lake SBC aims sky high

    Versalogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Harrier” SBC has an Apollo Lake processor and a compact 95 x 55mm footprint, ECC RAM support, and ruggedization features designed for high altitude UAVs. Versalogic announced a Harrier SBC due in Q1 2020 that revises the compact, COM-and-carrier design of its three-year-old, Intel Bay Trail based Osprey, but advances to the newer Intel Apollo Lake. The Osprey is similarly bereft of real-world ports to enable easier real-world deployments in constrained environments.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (jss and kernel), Debian (libpcap, openjdk-8, and tcpdump), Fedora (java-11-openjdk), openSUSE (libreoffice), Oracle (java-1.7.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.7.0-openjdk, python, and wget), Scientific Linux (java-1.7.0-openjdk), SUSE (ceph, ceph-iscsi, ses-manual_en, dhcp, openconnect, and procps), and Ubuntu (exiv2, linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-5.0, linux-snapdragon, and uw-imap).

  • Password lessons: Longer is better, so is salt

    Infosec pros who had no idea of how easily a stolen list of hashed passwords could be cracked got a sobering lesson at this month’s SecTor security conference in Toronto. There, Will Hunt, co-founder of the U.K. based In.security consulting firm, casually talked of systems that can be built around a common (about $1,500) Nvidea GTX 2080 graphics card that could make 100 billion guesses a second in a brute force attack.

Unix Celebrates 50 Years

Today and tomorrow Nokia Bell Labs is hosting a two-day event celebrating 50 years of the Unix operating system, reflecting on Unix’s past and exploring the future of computing. Speakers and panelists include many of the original team that built Unix and designed the C programming language. Read more

Red Hat Leftovers

  • How we brought JavaScript to life for Command Line Heroes

    Animators within Red Hat?s Open Studio help bring Command Line Heroes? artwork more to life. All throughout Season 3, they?ve added movement to our episode pages and created eye-catching trailers for social and Red Hat?s YouTube channel. This post highlights their important contributions to the Command Line Heroes? creative process by looking at their work for Episode 3 of Season 4: Creating JavaScript. Also, designer Karen Crowson talks about the easter eggs in that episode?s artwork.

  • Red Hat Ceph Storage RGW deployment strategies and sizing guidance

    Starting in Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.0, Red Hat added support for Containerized Storage Daemons (CSD) which allows the software-defined storage components (Ceph MON, OSD, MGR, RGW, etc) to run within containers. CSD avoids the need to have dedicated nodes for storage services thus reducing both CAPEX and OPEX by co-located storage containerized daemons. Ceph-Ansible provides the required mechanism to put resource fencing to each storage container which is useful for running multiple storage daemon containers on one physical node. In this blog post, we will cover strategies to deploy RGW containers and their resource sizing guidance. Before we dive into the performance, let's understand what are the different ways to deploy RGW.

  • OpenShift 4.2: New YAML Editor

    Through our built-in YAML editor, users can create and edit resources right in the Red Hat OpenShift Web Console UI. In the latest release, we’ve upgraded our editor to include language server support. What is language server support? The language server support feature uses the OpenAPI schema from Kubernetes to provide content assist inside the YAML editor based on the type of resource you are editing. More specifically, the language server support offers the following capabilities: Improved YAML validation: The new editor provides feedback in context, directing you to the exact line and position that requires attention. Document outlining: Document outlines offer a quick way to navigate your code. Auto completion: While in the editor, language server support will provide you with valid configuration information as you type, allowing you to edit faster. Hover support: Hovering over a property will show a description of the associated schema. Advanced formatting: Format your YAML.