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February 2010

Distro Hoppin`: Igelle 1.0.0

Filed under
Linux

itlure.com: What I've got here is a Linux distribution that is based on... NOTHING! Yes, peeps, you've heard me! Igelle stands proud on its own two feet and presents itself as "the world's most flexible operatings system".

Desktop Linux vs. Windows 7

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

fewt.com: While I have exposure to Windows and Linux distributions on many disparate devices, this review will focus on a single model computer; the Asus Eee PC 1000HE.

Why Fedora needs an Updates Policy

Filed under
Linux

jwboyer.livejournal.com: A huge thread-o-doom on Fedora and updates and what should be done and why the policy is horrible has sprouted on the fedora-devel list (yes, it's now called devel@lists.fp.o, but I don't care.) But wait... there is no draft policy yet so how can it be horrible?

Time To Rebut The IIPA's FUD Against Open Source

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: A recent blog posting at The Guardian about the US "Special 301" rules has generated deep concern around the global open source community. It points to this year's recommendations from the controversially-named International Intellectual Property Alliance.

4 New Themes For Lucid

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 4 New Themes For Lucid including Homosapien and Sorbet
  • Ubuntu One Music has No Watermarks
  • Ubuntu Lucid Makes Scanning Simple

Dedo Does Debian - Review

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Debian is one of the more important Linux distributions. Without Debian, we would probably not have Ubuntu or APT and Linux desktop would still be a dream. And it just happens that I never gave it a proper review, until now.

The Perennial Year of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

tuxtweaks.com: It's become a tradition (and a bit of a running joke) for bloggers and tech pundits to declare that this year (whatever year you're in) will be The Year of the Linux Desktop. So in following with that tradition, I'm here to declare that 2010 will be The Year of the Linux Desktop.

KDESC 4.3+: Video, Music, Image and Document Preview in Dolphin

Filed under
Software
HowTos

mygnulinux.com: In most distributions that come with KDE Software Compilation 4.3 and above, opening Dolphin for browsing the filesystem will give you Preview Mode Button. We will expand on this option.

The First Ever Gnome Shell Themes

Filed under
Linux

It's very easy to create Gnome Shell themes as only some very basic knowledge of CSS and a bit of GIMP is needed. For now, installing a Gnome Shell theme implies overwriting the original theme files and only one theme can be installed, which each new theme overwriting the previous one. But Gnome Shell is still in early development stages, so this is a good start.

Rest here

Tiny Core- A 10 MB Tiny Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

unixmen.com: Tiny Core Linux is a very small (10 MB) minimal Linux GUI Desktop. It is based on Linux 2.6 kernel, Busybox, Tiny X, and Fltk.

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Futureproofing Your Python Tools

    The people who maintain Python and key Python platforms want to help you protect the code you write and depend on. [...] Publishing that package is a great way of making it so other people can run and deploy it, even within other parts of your organization. But -- who actually has the keys to the castle? Who can upload a new version, or delete a version that has a problem? You should probably make sure multiple people have either "owner" or "maintainer" privileges on the project on PyPI. And you should review your project security history display, which lists sensitive events (such as "file removed from release version 1.0.1") in your PyPI user account and your PyPI project. We just added this display, so you can look at things that have happened in your user account or project, and check for signs someone's stolen your credentials.

  • py3status v3.20 – EuroPython 2019 edition

    Shame on me to post this so long after it happened… Still, that’s a funny story to tell and a lot of thank you to give so let’s go!

  • Finding Python Developers for Your Startup

    Recently I stumble across a situation while I was helping out for one of the events for JuniorDev SG. There was not a lot of Python developers and some of my other developer's friend. Said that they hardly encounter any developer friends who are using Python for their work. It begins during a conversation, where one of the attendees for a JuniorDev SG event. Approached me to search for Python developers to work for their startup based in Singapore.

Geary 3.34 Debuts with Deeper GNOME Contacts Integration, Other Changes

The Geary email client has issued a brand new release, and in this post I tell you a bit about it. Geary 3.34.0 — you may recall that Geary switched to following GNOME numbering last year — is the latest update to this web-mail friendly mail tool, and there’s healthy dose of improvement on offer, as noted in the release notes. Among them is deeper integration with GNOME Contacts. Geary’s in-app contacts pop-over now supports adding and editing contacts stored in the GNOME Contacts app, and is able to auto-complete email addresses based on data from contacts too. Serial typo-makers like me will appreciate the spell checker now covering the mail composer’s subject line; while the addition of support for Outlook-specific email attachments (TNEF) will please those who regularly run in to issues on that front. Other changes in Geary 3.34.0 include “a substantial number” of server compatibility improvements, background syncing tweaks, and other bug fixes. Read more

today's howtos

Best free Linux firewalls of 2019: go beyond Iptables for desktops and servers

Linux distros will often come with at least a basic firewall bundled with it. Often this won't be active by default so will need to be activated. Additionally this will likely be the standard Iptables supplied, even though less experienced users may struggle with it. UFW - Uncomplicated Firewall is also bundled with some distros, and aims to make the process simpler. However, there are distros and applications out there that can cater for the more advanced user and the less experienced one, making it easier to setup and configure a firewall that works for your needs. Some, like ClearOS build it directly into the operating system as part of its security focus, but most other options would be applications that aim to block rogue IPs, monitor ports, and prevent otherwise prevent bad packets from interfering with your machine. For most home users there are few actual settings that need to be customized, so simple apps can be popular, but for those looking to manage their machine as a server, additional controls and advanced command options will tend to be the more welcome. Read more