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January 2010

Showing files metadata under KDE is like Russian roulette

Filed under
KDE

linux-wizard.net: since KDE 4.x and Nepomuk integration Dolphin is unable to show metadata informations for a file if the file is not indexed by Strigi and Nepomuk ( KDE bug #193592 ). This explains why I had more and more issues having the size of a photo ... This is really insane.

Shardana Antivirus Rescue Disk Utility

Filed under
Linux
Software
HowTos

linux-tip.net: This is perhaps the best tool you have ever seen and the best stuff for your USB Stick. Shardana Antivirus Rescue Disk Utility (Sardu) is software that can produce an ISO or an IMA anti-virus bootable CD, comprehensive collections of utilities, the most popular distributions of Linux Lite, and the best known Windows PE.

Why debian rocks

Filed under
Linux

warpedtimes.wordpress: It has been quite some time, actually years, since I started using Debian. I just thought to write the reasons for which I really like Debian compared to other systems.

Thinkpad X40 and openSUSE 11.2

Filed under
SUSE

bitsnbikes.blogspot: Note to self... and anyone interested... Installing openSUSE 11.2 in a IBM thinkpad X40:

X@FOSDEM 2010 Is Now A Half-Day Event

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Well, it was bad enough when X@FOSDEM became a one day event (where for the past several years it has been a highly-populated two-day conference) at the upcoming Free Open Source Developers' European Meeting (FOSDEM) taking place in Brussels next weekend, but now it's not even a one day event.

Review of Xiphos Bible Study Software

Filed under
Software

gabrielforster.com: Xiphos (formerly known as GnomeSword) is a Bible study tool written for Linux, UNIX, and Windows under the GNOME toolkit, offering a rich and featureful environment for reading, study, and research using modules from The SWORD Project and elsewhere.

Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 updated

Filed under
Linux

The Debian project is pleased to announce the fourth update of its stable distribution Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 (codename "lenny"). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems.

Accessing Freenode IRC Network via SSL

Filed under
Software
Web
HowTos
  • Accessing Freenode IRC Network via SSL Secure Connection
  • Freenode IRC – Connect And Auth Securely
  • Freenode, SSL and SASL Authentication with Irssi
  • My Favorite Irssi Scripts

How To Set Up A USB-Over-IP Server And Client With OpenSUSE 11.2

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a USB-over-IP server with OpenSUSE 11.2 as well as a USB-over-IP client (also running OpenSUSE 11.2). The USB/IP Project aims to develop a general USB device sharing system over IP network. To share USB devices between computers with their full functionality, USB/IP encapsulates "USB I/O messages" into TCP/IP payloads and transmits them between computers. USB-over-IP can be useful for virtual machines, for example, that don't have access to the host system's hardware - USB-over-IP allows virtual machines to use remote USB devices.

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Extensions in VLC media player, starting from version 1.1
  • Screencast: SELinux Demystified
  • Lomo Script for Gimp with Old Style Colors
  • XRandR comes to the rescue
  • The More I Upgrade, the Worse It Gets
  • Getting rid of initramfs trying to update a non-exsiting initrd file
  • HowTo Find out if Installed Linux is 32 bits or 64 bits
  • Configure the graphical firewall manager on Pardus 2009.1
  • JPackage – Yum Repositories for CentOS, Fedora and Redhat
  • Linux - ARP
  • Support for Broadcom Wireless Devices – Debian – Testing
  • Support for nVidia GeForce graphics card – Debian – Testing

More in Tux Machines

Security: Linux, Docker and Guix

  • Unpatched Linux bug may open devices to serious attacks over Wi-Fi

    The flaw is located in the RTLWIFI driver, which is used to support Realtek Wi-Fi chips in Linux devices. The vulnerability triggers a buffer overflow in the Linux kernel when a machine with a Realtek Wi-Fi chip is within radio range of a malicious device. At a minimum, exploits would cause an operating-system crash and could possibly allow a hacker to gain complete control of the computer. The flaw dates back to version 3.10.1 of the Linux kernel released in 2013.

  • Docker Attack Worm Mines for Monero
  • Insecure permissions on profile directory (CVE-2019-18192)

    We have become aware of a security issue for Guix on multi-user systems that we have just fixed (CVE-2019-18192). Anyone running Guix on a multi-user system is encouraged to upgrade guix-daemon—see below for instructions. Context The default user profile, ~/.guix-profile, points to /var/guix/profiles/per-user/$USER. Until now, /var/guix/profiles/per-user was world-writable, allowing the guix command to create the $USER sub-directory. On a multi-user system, this allowed a malicious user to create and populate that $USER sub-directory for another user that had not yet logged in. Since /var/…/$USER is in $PATH, the target user could end up running attacker-provided code. See the bug report for more information. This issue was initially reported by Michael Orlitzky for Nix (CVE-2019-17365).

In 2019, multiple open source companies changed course—is it the right move?

Free and open source software enables the world as we know it in 2019. From Web servers to kiosks to the big data algorithms mining your Facebook feed, nearly every computer system you interact with runs, at least in part, on free software. And in the larger tech industry, free software has given rise to a galaxy of startups and enabled the largest software acquisition in the history of the world. Free software is a gift, a gift that made the world as we know it possible. And from the start, it seemed like an astounding gift to give. So astounding in fact that it initially made businesses unaccustomed to this kind of generosity uncomfortable. These companies weren't unwilling to use free software, it was simply too radical and by extension too political. It had to be renamed: "open source." Once that happened, open source software took over the world. Recently, though, there's been a disturbance in the open source force. Within the last year, companies like Redis Labs, MongoDB, and Confluent all changed their software licenses, moving away from open source licenses to more restrictive terms that limit what can be done with the software, making it no longer open source software. Read more Also: Network Time Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative

Red Hat: OpenShift, RHEL, Dependency Analytics, vDPA and More

  • Red Hat Expands the Kubernetes Developer Experience with Newest Version of Red Hat OpenShift 4

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced Red Hat OpenShift 4.2, the latest version of Red Hat’s trusted enterprise Kubernetes platform designed to deliver a more powerful developer experience. Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 extends Red Hat’s commitment to simplifying and automating enterprise-grade services across the hybrid cloud while empowering developers to innovate and enhance business value through cloud-native applications.

  • RHEL and Insights combo illuminates threats and spotlights performance for Red Hat systems

    When Red Hat Inc. officially rolled out its Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, or RHEL 8, operating system in May, the open-source software company also included Red Hat Insights with every subscription for the new release. Based on data supplied by one of the company’s top executives, that has proven to be a wise decision. Insights is a software as a service product that works from a rules-based engine to offer continuous connected analysis of registered Red Hat-based systems. “We’ve seen an 87% increase since May in the number of systems that are linked in,” said Stefanie Chiras (pictured), vice president and general manager of the RHEL Business Unit at Red Hat. “We’re seeing a 33% increase in coverage of rules-based and a 152% increase in customers who are using it. That creates a community of people using and getting value from it, but also giving value back because the more data we have the better the rules get.”

  • What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

    We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE. Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing. Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

  • Breaking cloud native network performance barriers

    Up until now we have covered virtio-networking and its usage in VMs. We started with the original vhost-net/virtio-net architecture, moved on to the vhost-user/virito-pmd architecture and continued to vDPA (vHost Data Path Acceleration) where the virtio ring layout was pushed all the way into the NIC providing wiresspeed/wirelatency to VMs. We now turn our attention to using vDPA for providing wirespeed/wirelatency L2 interfaces to containers leveraging kubernetes to orchestrate the overall solution. We will demonstrate how Containerized Network Functions (CNFs) can be accelerated using a combination of vDPA interfaces and DPDK libraries. The vDPA interfaces are added as a secondary interface to containers using the Multus CNI plugin. This post is a high level solution overview describing the main building blocks and how they fit together. We assume that the reader has an overall understanding of Kubernetes, the Container Network Interface (CNI) and NFV terminology such as VNFs and CNFs.

  • Top 5 stress reliefs for sysadmins

Purism shows off more pictures of Librem 5 Phone and PureOS UI

As the first batch of the Librem 5 phones starts reaching its respectful owners, we can now have a better look at the product from its pictures taken by the customers. Before we check them out, let’s get to know a bit more about these phones. The Librem 5 smartphones are powered by PureOS, which is a Linux-based mobile operating system. The brains behind this product, namely Purism, have made it their top priority to offer such phones that provide security, privacy, and freedom to the customers. Accordingly, this product has been made for people who want to have complete control over their phones. You should check out this article if you want to know more about the Librem 5 smartphones. Now coming back to the news, people who have ordered this phone are in for a treat as the Librem 5 comes with a black anodized aluminum case. Not only it’s stylish, but it also maintains high radio reception quality – thanks to its non-metal backing. It accompanies easier-to-slide, flush hardware kill switches. Read more Also: Nathan Wolf: New Life to Rock Candy Gamepad for PS3 | Another Repair