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December 2009

Ubuntu Tweak Gets New Website, New Release

Filed under
Software
  • Ubuntu Tweak Gets New User-based Website, New Release
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.5: An Early Look

The Great Fallacy of BSD Unix vs. Linux

Filed under
Linux
BSD

sob.apotheon.org: "Linux is just a kernel." It's a commonly heard refrain amongst the arguments put forward by BSD Unix aficionados, and it is a true statement, but it is all too often abused to try to make a fallacious point.

The Linux Commercial Contest

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: As promised yesterday, this is my potential solution to the Linux survival question: A Linux Commercial--created by you--and it's a contest. Sound exciting?

Say Happy New Year to srlinuxx!

Filed under
Just talk

Dear friends,

Tuxmachines is our site for news and we love it! Just think about the great performance, stability, pleasure, and swift news postings you have got used to reading. srlinuxx is working relentlessly, day and night, to provide us the latest and finest news articles. And all this for free! But she, as anyone of us, has bills to pay and needs to eat and drink something to keep up this fantastic work, right? Don't you want to express your gratitude for your everyday trusted news site? Wouldn't it be great to make this year a very special one for srlinuxx? Yes? Now is your chance to finally get rid of your qualms and do something you wanted to do for a long time: Go and say Thank you and Happy New Year to srlinux for all her time, effort, and hard work so she can continue providing you the best news site out there!

Best wishes and happy holidays!

Click here to Say Thank You!

P.S. Happy Birthday srlinuxx.

Trying Out Single Window Mode on GIMP 2.7

Filed under
GIMP

learningubuntu.com: The open source image editor known as GIMP doesn't need an introduction. Neither does its multi-window interface.

Are Linux Users Just Penny Pinchers?

Filed under
Linux

tech-itch.com: I think it’s unfair to base an argument solely around price. Many a Linux user can afford the money to set up a Windows machine, I’m not sure on the stats but I’ll wager many a user will dual boot in one form or another. I, for example, work in Linux wheras for my home/personal use I boot to Windows more often as I game and use Windows only DAWs.

Noteworthy Mdv Cooker changes 21 dec – 31 dec

Filed under
MDV

artipc10.vub.ac.be: In spite of the holiday season, lots of new packages continue to trickle in Mandriva Cooker. Amongst the many updates, here is an overview of some important changes:

A Look Back At Docky in 2009

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: As with a few other of my favourite Linux applications, Docky has an incredibly insightful and focused team who hare a passion for making Docky awesome – as proven by its breathtakingly fast development speed! So, to Docky – my favourite application of 2009!

2010 - A Linux Odyssey

Filed under
Linux
  • 2010 - A Linux Odyssey
  • Open source predictions for 2010
  • 2010 as the year of Linux on the desktop – does it really matter?

The Meaning of ’su’

pthree.org: When I taught for Guru Labs, part of the students training was covering different ways of becoming the root user, such as using “su”, “sudo” and taking advantage of the wheel group. So, what does “su” mean?

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Futureproofing Your Python Tools

    The people who maintain Python and key Python platforms want to help you protect the code you write and depend on. [...] Publishing that package is a great way of making it so other people can run and deploy it, even within other parts of your organization. But -- who actually has the keys to the castle? Who can upload a new version, or delete a version that has a problem? You should probably make sure multiple people have either "owner" or "maintainer" privileges on the project on PyPI. And you should review your project security history display, which lists sensitive events (such as "file removed from release version 1.0.1") in your PyPI user account and your PyPI project. We just added this display, so you can look at things that have happened in your user account or project, and check for signs someone's stolen your credentials.

  • py3status v3.20 – EuroPython 2019 edition

    Shame on me to post this so long after it happened… Still, that’s a funny story to tell and a lot of thank you to give so let’s go!

  • Finding Python Developers for Your Startup

    Recently I stumble across a situation while I was helping out for one of the events for JuniorDev SG. There was not a lot of Python developers and some of my other developer's friend. Said that they hardly encounter any developer friends who are using Python for their work. It begins during a conversation, where one of the attendees for a JuniorDev SG event. Approached me to search for Python developers to work for their startup based in Singapore.

Geary 3.34 Debuts with Deeper GNOME Contacts Integration, Other Changes

The Geary email client has issued a brand new release, and in this post I tell you a bit about it. Geary 3.34.0 — you may recall that Geary switched to following GNOME numbering last year — is the latest update to this web-mail friendly mail tool, and there’s healthy dose of improvement on offer, as noted in the release notes. Among them is deeper integration with GNOME Contacts. Geary’s in-app contacts pop-over now supports adding and editing contacts stored in the GNOME Contacts app, and is able to auto-complete email addresses based on data from contacts too. Serial typo-makers like me will appreciate the spell checker now covering the mail composer’s subject line; while the addition of support for Outlook-specific email attachments (TNEF) will please those who regularly run in to issues on that front. Other changes in Geary 3.34.0 include “a substantial number” of server compatibility improvements, background syncing tweaks, and other bug fixes. Read more

today's howtos

Best free Linux firewalls of 2019: go beyond Iptables for desktops and servers

Linux distros will often come with at least a basic firewall bundled with it. Often this won't be active by default so will need to be activated. Additionally this will likely be the standard Iptables supplied, even though less experienced users may struggle with it. UFW - Uncomplicated Firewall is also bundled with some distros, and aims to make the process simpler. However, there are distros and applications out there that can cater for the more advanced user and the less experienced one, making it easier to setup and configure a firewall that works for your needs. Some, like ClearOS build it directly into the operating system as part of its security focus, but most other options would be applications that aim to block rogue IPs, monitor ports, and prevent otherwise prevent bad packets from interfering with your machine. For most home users there are few actual settings that need to be customized, so simple apps can be popular, but for those looking to manage their machine as a server, additional controls and advanced command options will tend to be the more welcome. Read more