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November 2009

Photo Compositing with The GIMP

Filed under
GIMP
HowTos

It is no longer about the Killer Application

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: I have been thinking about the Open Source world more than I have in the past. And as I have been talking about it with people, I have been getting the standard responses you might expect. An email from my friend Karl, in response to an email I sent, seemed to sum it all up:

Linux Mint 8 - Review and Commentary

Filed under
Linux

linuxcritic.com: With this new release, comes a new green based desktop that has been heavily customized. The welcome screen has the option to open a chat room, forums or contribute to the system in other ways and acts as a good introduction to the OS.

Fedora Linux 12

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: The latest release of Fedora is version 12 and it includes some nifty new features. I downloaded the Live CD version of Fedora 12 that features the Gnome desktop environment.

Linux rescues a failing hard drive

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: Over Thanksgiving, I had to deal with a Windows XP laptop, belonging to a relative, that blue screened during startup. Normal startup failed, as did safe mode, safe mode with command prompt and Last Known Good.

The End Of The CrunchPad

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

techcrunch.com: It was so close I could taste it. Two weeks ago we were ready to publicly launch the CrunchPad. The device was stable enough for a demo. And then the entire project self destructed over nothing more than greed, jealousy and miscommunication.

Linux: Freedom or Freakdom?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: I was talking with my friend, Jason Perlow, yesterday and he told me that I should back off of the free software rants because he feels that I'm entering the gray edges of freakdom. We laughed about it but it made me think: When does a strong belief in something become extremism?

Mandriva Linux 2010 GNOME – Solid and Sweet

Filed under
MDV

pbs01.wordpress: I had a quick look at the Mandriva Linux 2010 GNOME edition and it turned out to be great. Having used Mandriva Linux 2009 and 2009 Spring GNOME, I was certain that this release is going to be as solid as stable as it ever was.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Humble Store, Bully: Scholarship and DOSBox

  • Humble Store has a 'Tabletop Sale' going, some good Linux games on offer

    It's the start of another glorious week for Linux gaming and another big sale is going on again. Over on the Humble Store, they have a Tabletop Sale now live.

  • How to play Bully: Scholarship Edition on Linux

    Bully: Scholarship Edition is a remaster of Rockstar Game’s “Bully,” a game about a young kid working his way through the social hierarchy of high school, meeting girls, making friends, and causing mischief. The game is an open world, which is typical of Rockstar. Here’s how to get it working on your Linux PC.

  • DOSBox – Run classic DOS games on your Linux PC

    DOSBox is an open-source software that creates a virtual MS-DOS compatible environment, including sound, graphics, and basic networking. It enables you to run DOS applications without any modifications. Using this wonderful app, you can run your classic DOS games and compilers like Wolfenstein 3D, Prince of Persia, Turbo C++, and MASM on your Linux PC. DOSBox makes use of Simple DirectMedia Layer (SDL), a library designed to allow low-level access to hardware components like a mouse, keyboards, sound system, and graphics. It has made the whole process of porting easier to various platforms. Currently, DOSBox runs on several platforms like different Linux, Windows, and macOS.

The CLA Denial-Of-Service attack

Obviously, there's a flaw in that logic. A CLA is an agreement between a project and a (new) contributor. A project does not absolutely requires the contributor to sign the agreement to accept its contributions, in theory. It's the reverse: for the contributor to have their patch accepted, they need to accept the CLA. But the project could accept contributions without CLA without violating the law. But it seems that projects sometimes end up doing a DOS on themselves by refusing perfectly fine contributions from drive-by contributors who don't have time to waste filling forms on all projects they stumble upon. In the case of this typo, I could have submitted a patch, but because I didn't sign a CLA, again, the project couldn't have merged it without breaking their own rules, even if someone else submits the same patch, after agreeing to the CLA. So, in effect, I would have DOS'd the project by providing the patch, so I just opened an issue which strangely — and hopefully — isn't covered by the CLA. Read more

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