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September 2009

Gentoo updates and annoyances

Filed under
Gentoo

thelinuxexperiment.com: After hearing about the recent MintCast mention of our experiment, I figured it was high time to post an update with what’s gone right and what’s been enraging about my experiences with Gentoo over the past month.

AMD R600/700 2D Performance: Open vs. Closed Drivers

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: While the ATI Radeon HD 5800 graphics cards were introduced last week, the open-source support for the Radeon HD 2000/3000/4000 series is finally maturing. In this article we have benchmarks showing the 2D performance between these two driver options with both an R600 and R700 graphics card.

Power searching Linux with SearchMonkey

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: There are search tools and then there are SEARCH TOOLS. Any Linux user that has ever needed real power for their searches generally has to resort to the command line. But what if you could have a GUI tool that could also handle regular expressions?

Can You Boycott a Boycott?

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: From the things-that-should-never-happen-but-you-knew-they-would-eventually department, comes more flamage in the Mono advocates vs. anti-Mono advocates vs. the now anti-anti-Mono advocates.

Evince: Speed and Functionality Combined

Filed under
Software

softpedia.com: In the heterogeneous computing world of today, documents are encapsulated in a variety of formats, from the mundane PDF to the high-resolution tiffs needed in typography. To be able to view all of them you could use four or five different applications, or you could just employ Evince.

The Business of Open Source is Not Software

Filed under
OSS

adventuresinoss.com: I’ve been staying out of the free vs. open source wars running around my little corner of the world of late. There is a lot of talk about whether or not open source has “won”. Open source is free software, so it seems silly to try to differentiate the two.

Will Linux ever be a popular desktop system? Take the poll

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Linux versus Windows has been the subject of debate for quite some time, but will it (Linux) ever achieve the status of a popular desktop product that we’ll have to support? Share your opinion and take the poll.

The Linux terminal - Outliving its relevancy?

Filed under
Linux

sinaisix.blogspot: I strongly believe - and so do most non-geek Linux users- that there was a time when the terminal was a very vital component of Linux: a time when Linux was mainly a hobbyist OS that was used by only geeks, most of whom disliked anything remotely akin to graphics. However, in today's OS world...

Free, Native Linux Plug-ins for energyXT for Linux

Filed under
Software

createdigitalmusic.com: It’s simply stunning some of the terrific instrument and effect plug-ins available that are now free and open source – yes, free as in freedom, not just freeware. I had commented in the past something along the lines of, “boy, wouldn’t it be great if this now meant, say, a Linux port?”

Waiting for Chrome

Filed under
OS

blogs.computerworld.com: I keep expecting Google to release an alpha version of their Chrome operating system, but it hasn't happened yet. I know they're working on it, but that's about all I can say. However, over in China, there's a story of early devices running alpha Chrome and some Linux fans have made their own version of Chrome.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • What is Automation and Configuration Management with CHEF – Part 1

    Configuration Management is the key focus point of DevOps practice. In the Software development cycle, all the servers should be software-configured and maintained well in such a way that they should not make any break in the development cycle. Bad configuration Management can make system outages, leaks, and data breaches. Using Configuration Management tools is about facilitating accuracy, efficiency, and speed in the DevOps-driven environment. There are two models of configuration Management tools – PUSH-based & PULL-based. In the PUSH-based, the Master server pushes the configuration code to the servers wherein PULL-based individual servers contact the Master for getting configuration code. PUPPET and CHEF are widely used PULL-based models, ANSIBLE is a popular PUSH-based model. In this article, we will see about CHEF.

  • How to Install XWiki on Ubuntu 20.04

    XWiki is a free and open-source Wiki Software platform written in Java. It runs on servlet containers like Tomcat and uses a database such as MySQL to store information.

  • How To Install Zoom on Manjaro 20 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Zoom on Manjaro 20. For those of you who didn’t know, Zoom is the leader in modern enterprise video communications, with an easy, reliable cloud platform for video and audio conferencing, chat, and webinars across mobile, desktop, and room systems. It is commonly used in education sectors, in workplaces for communication with clients and colleagues, teleconferencing, and even for social relations. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of Zoom on a Manjaro 20 (Nibia).

  • Starting LaTeX on Ubuntu with the User Friendly Gummi

    Academics people and alike tend to love documents written with LaTeX -- one of the best text creation systems you can run on computer. The benefit is, the resulting document is truly beautiful. To start making LaTeX document on Ubuntu, you can start with the user friendly application, Gummi, which features preview. This short tutorial includes examples for basic texting and several math formulas. Now let's learn!

What is GNU/Linux Copypasta?

I’d just like to interject for a moment. What you’re refering to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I’ve recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX. Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called Linux, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine’s resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called Linux distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux! Read more

Ben Widawsky: Framebuffer Modifiers Part 1

In a now pretty well established tradition on my part, I am posting on things I no longer work on! I gave a talk on modifiers at XDC 2017 and Linux Plumbers 2017 audio only. It was always my goal to have a blog post accompany the work. Relatively shortly after the talks, I ended up leaving graphics and so it dropped on the priority list. I'm splitting this up into two posts. This post will go over the problem, and solutions. The next post will go over the implementation details. Read more

Linux Lite 5.4 Will Be Based on Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS, Release Candidate Ready for Testing

Linux Lite is a user-friendly distro that aims to bring more ex-Windows users to the Linux and Open Source ecosystem. The new release of this Ubuntu derived distribution, Linux Lite 5.4, will be based on Canonical’s recently released Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system. But Linux Lite 5.4 will ship with the long-term supported Linux 5.4 LTS kernel instead of the much newer Linux kernel 5.8 from Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS. However, users will be able to install any other kernel they want up to the recently released Linux kernel 5.11 from the software repositories with just two commands. Read more