Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

April 2007

First Look: Firefox 3 Alpha 4

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla has reached another milestone in the development of Firefox 3, releasing version alpha 4 over the weekend. As with the previous alpha releases, Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 is intended primarily for the developer community and is not yet ready for prime-time use.

Alpha 4 brings a number of new enhancements to Firefox 3, which we outlined yesterday.

Dell to choose Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Officially, Dell Inc. hasn't said a word yet about which Linux it will be preloading on its desktops and laptops. Several sources within Dell, however, have told DesktopLinux.com that Dell's desktop Linux pick is going to be Ubuntu.

Review of PCLinuxOS 2007 Test Release 4

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

I find it hard to explain why I love PClinuxOS as much as I do, especially considering the other day when I decided to drop into Ubuntu to perform some basic tasks. PCLinuxOS is an excellent release and PCLOS2007 is looking like a real contender for most usable Linux 2007. Let's see how test release 4 behaves.

Reject Windows addiction, says advocate

Filed under
Microsoft

Outspoken Australian free software advocate Con Zymaris has labelled Microsoft's plan to offer Windows for $3 dollars to developing nations as an attempt to "addict" users to Microsoft software.

WHY is the transition from Windows to Linux easy for some people?

Filed under
Linux

After I'd closed the lid on the "Ubuntu is not Linux" , uh, mess, Eric over at Binary World has taken up the idea and tried to grapple with it. I don't know, maybe I should dig it up and check for a pulse. But I'm thinking again... (that's always a dangerous sign!)

Here's the nut of the matter: moving from Windows to Linux is easy for some people and hard for others. WHY?

New mutt 1.5.15 has a very nice new feature!

Filed under
Software

Just found today when I was looking to see if I missed something with the mutt sidebar patch (still irritates me that I have to sync a mailbox before jumping to another mailbox in order for the counts in the sidebar to be updated properly), that mutt 1.5.15 was released earlier this month. This is an extremely worthwhile upgrade, especially because it now has SMTP support built-in.

Introducing Ubuntu’s Add/Remove Packages

Filed under
HowTos

Last week, my fellow FOSSwire blogger Jacob introduced you to APT, the powerful package management system that is underneath Ubuntu.

The command line interface is the most powerful way to manipulate the software installed on your system, but to users who aren’t familiar with a command line interface, it can be a bit daunting.

Standard Office

Filed under
KDE

June 21th 2005 was the day KOffice released version 1.4. I highlight that release because it was the first release where KOffice switched its native format to the OpenDocument Format. That would become an official ISO standard in May 2006.

PCLinuxOS Magazine May 2007 Issue 9 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by MyPCLinuxOS.com, the May 2007 issue (#9) is available for download!

Some highlights include:

1. KDE User Guide Part 2
2. Scroogle and Konqueror Integration
3. Top Ten Reasons for Using Linux
4. Linux in Education
5. Updating PCLinuxOS to 2007

Japanese schools may convert aging computers to Linux

Filed under
Linux

A recent article in OhMyNews.com discusses the results of a conference in Tokyo at which educators recommended converting aging computers running Windows 98 and ME to Linux. About 400,000 such machines exist in Japan's public schools and either can't run more up-to-date operating systems or the cost of upgrade is prohibitive.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Fake News and AI Fund

  • How to spot (and do something) about real fake news

    Think you can spot fake news when you see it? You might be surprised even the most digitally savvy folks can (at times) be fooled into believing a headline or resharing a photo that looks real, but is actually not.

  • Launching the European AI Fund

    Right now, we’re in the early stages of the next phase of computing: AI. First we had the desktop. Then the internet. And smartphones. Increasingly, we’re living in a world where computing is built around vast troves of data and the algorithms that parse them. They power everything from the social platforms and smart speakers we use everyday, to the digital machinery of our governments and economies. In parallel, we’re entering a new phase of how we think about, deploy, and regulate technology. Will the AI era be defined by individual privacy and transparency into how these systems work? Or, will the worst parts of our current internet ecosystem — invasive data collection, monopoly, opaque systems — continue to be the norm? A year ago, a group of funders came together at Mozilla’s Berlin office to talk about just this: how we, as a collective, could help shape the direction of AI in Europe. We agreed on the importance of a landscape where European public interest and civil society organisations — and not just big tech companies — have a real say in shaping policy and technology. The next phase of computing needs input from a diversity of actors that represent society as a whole.

Is Open Source a Religion?

Is open source a religion? There is a persistent myth that free/open source software (F/OSS) supporters think of F/OSS as a religion. SUSE is the largest open source software company, so that would make us, what, a church with the cutest mascot? Of course this is wrong and F/OSS is not a religion, though the idea of working in a hushed cathedral-like atmosphere with pretty stained glass and organ music is appealing. (Visit St. John’s Cathedral in Spokane, Washington, USA to see a real genuine full-sized pipe organ. When it hits the low notes it rattles your bones from the inside.) If I really want stained glass and my own cathedral I can have those for just because, so let us move on to what F/OSS is really about, and what the value is for everyone who touches it, like customers, vendors, learners, hobbyists, governments– you might be surprised at the reach of F/OSS and its affect on the lives of pretty much everyone. Read more

today's howtos

today's leftovers

  • Computer Science University of Cuba, 18 years creating the future

    Among the many programs conceived there are the Nova system, a Cuban distribution of GNU / Linux that promotes the values ​​of sovereignty and technological independence, and are national leaders in the country's migration to Free Software and Open Source technologies.

  • New Ensemble Graphics Toolkit Optimized for 32-bit MPUs Running Linux Operating System

    Graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and interactive touchscreen displays provide intuitive user experiences in applications from robotic and machine controls to medical user interfaces, automotive instrumentation and home and building automation systems. A well-designed GUI enables users to process information more quickly and interact more effectively with a product. Microchip Technology Inc. (Nasdaq: MCHP) today announced a new GUI development toolkit for its portfolio of 32-bit microprocessors (MPUs) running Linux, helping designers of industrial, medical, consumer and automotive graphical displays to reduce development cost and time-to-market.

  • AMDGPU For Linux 5.10 Brings PCIe DPC Recovery, More RDNA2 Updates

    Another batch of AMDGPU kernel driver updates have landed in DRM-Next ahead of the upcoming Linux 5.10 kernel cycle. Queued already on the AMD Radeon side for Linux 5.10 has been more RDNA2 code for Navy Flounder and Sienna Cichlid, Southern Islands DC display code support, and other low-level updates. With this latest pull that was sent out on Friday and merged to DRM-Next on Monday there was more work, albeit mostly lower-level. There were yet more Sienna Cichlid and Navy Flounder updates but not Dimgrey Catfish or VanGogh that just appeared in RadeonSI as other RDNA2 devices.

  • What’s an Open Source Program Office?

    Open Source Program Offices help companies create and manage an open source strategy in terms of the adoption, use, support, participation, and development of open source software. OSPOs help companies understand both the benefits and potential drawbacks of open source software and how to balance those considerations to meet the company’s unique business goals. As Brian Proffitt explains on the Red Hat blog, “it’s not about implementing open source for the sake of open source. It's also about aligning open source tools and techniques with the needs of the organization.” The role of an OSPO is “to align the efforts of all relevant parts of an organization—engineering, sales, marketing, content creation—toward making open source methodologies and outputs successful,” Proffitt says.

  • Red Hat partners with Skillsbuild.org to offer retraining solution

    The impact of COVID-19 on the jobs market has been substantial, but we know that enterprises are still looking for qualified IT professionals. Red Hat is working to help those affected by COVID-19 gain the skills and knowledge that can help them find their next opportunity.

  • "A place for public code" +++ FSFE support +++ Job vacancy
  • Raspberry Pi powered e-paper display takes months to show a movie
  • Intel Announces Atom x6000E Series "Elkhart Lake", 11th Gen Core Tigerlake-UP3

    Given that they are IoT/embedded products where Linux dominates and all of the Elkhart Lake and Tigerlake open-source/Linux patches we have been noting over the past number of months, the Linux support should be quite ready to go for these new Intel offerings as soon as they begin appearing in actual devices. Those are the highlights from today's announcement and once we can get our hands on such hardware we'll certainly be putting them through much benchmarking to test the claims.