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April 2007

File Server Configuration in Debian Using Samba

Filed under
HowTos

Samba is a suite of Unix applications that speak the SMB (Server Message Block) protocol. Many operating systems,including Windows and OS/2, use SMB to perform client-server networking. By supporting this protocol, Samba allows Unix servers to get in on the action, communicating with the same networking protocol as Microsoft Windows products.

Install Samba in Debian

The open source experience

Filed under
OSS

Our series concludes with a look at where enterprises are using non-proprietary software. Looks like those traditional IT infrastructure projects were just the beginning

Open source is generally recognized as a platform for infrastructure, the foundation upon which things are built. But the business-specific applications built on top of that are a harder sell.

Linux terminology jargon buster

Filed under
Linux

Something that can often confuse people who are new to Linux is all the terminology. For people who have been using Linux for some time, we often forget that a lot of this stuff can sound really really confusing.

Linux On Wall Street Is Not An Oxymoron. Or Is It?

Filed under
Linux

The Linux on Wall Street conference in New York is an attempt to highlight Linux and open source vendors and solutions, demonstrating and pontificating on how they all can work together.

But can they work together?

Kubuntu 7.04 "Feisty Fawn"

Filed under
Ubuntu

The latest release of Ubuntu/Kubuntu is "Feisty Fawn", version 7.04. I chose Kubuntu since I prefer the KDE desktop environment over the Gnome environment. I also chose to install with the DVD media version rather than loading in up to 5 CDs.

Installation

KDE’s Panel Vacuum

Filed under
KDE

I’m quite amazed by how technologies which I used to discard as ‘hype’ (like, Solid or Phonon or so) actually seem to work. For real. Maybe I should feel a bit of shame but I don’t since this reflex of being sceptical of projects which have a fancy code name but not visible code base has proven quite useful in the past - helps to avoid working on vapourware.

Would you use Windows if it was GPL?

Filed under
OSS

In my last post, several people accused me of being anti-Microsoft. This is not true at all! I believe that Microsoft makes good products. Do you think they could attain a 95% market share without making a good product? That is not the way a market economy works.

Review: Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

Another six months, another release from the Ubuntu folks. The Ubuntu 7.04 release, better known as Ubuntu Feisty Fawn, is another cutting-edge, but not bleeding-edge, release that shows what Linux is capable of on the desktop. I've been running it since the early betas, and have found that it's the best Ubuntu release yet.

The road to Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla developers have updated the Firefox 3 (Gran Paradiso) development release schedule providing details on what to expect on each of them. Most notable change is that milestone releases will be now date based, with monthly releases, a departure from the when ready basis that has ruled since I can remember.

Why is Ubuntu no. 1? Because of distrowatch!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has a lot of things going for it. I learned a lot through it, and it eased my entry into Linux from Windows. But what my title is trying to say is this distrowatch deserves credit for Ubuntu’s meteoric rise to fame.

More in Tux Machines

Maintaining SUSE Linux support during the pandemic

The global pandemic and resulting government shelter-in-place or quarantine measures to limit the spread of the COVID-19 virus have shifted the priorities of IT organizations away from non-critical maintenance and upgrades. Unfortunately, the planned end of General Support date for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12 Service Pack 4 happens to be in the middle of this crisis. At SUSE, we understand the strain the current environment is putting on your IT operations so we have an option to help you keep your systems supported and secure. General Support for SLES 12 SP4 ends on June 30, 2020. Normally, organizations would either upgrade to a SLES service pack/version that still has full support or purchase up to 3 years of Long Term Service Pack Support (LTSS). Available today, organizations with current subscriptions of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP4 are eligible to receive continued access to patches and updates in the LTSS repositories free of charge for 3 months starting July 1, 2020, through September 30, 2020. Platforms included in this offer are x86-64 and IBM Z/LinuxOne. This gives IT teams more time to complete upgrade plans and evaluations at a time when staffing is limited and the focus is on keeping the business operational. Read more

Games: Akurra, RimWorld and Space Grunts 2

  • Akurra to support Linux without a stretch-goal on Kickstarter

    Game developer Jason Newman who is currently crowdfunding Akurra, mentioned here on GOL recently, has decided they no longer need a stretch-goal for Linux support. What is Akurra? A retro styled puzzle game, inspired by the likes of Chip's Challenge, Star Tropics, Sokoban, and Zelda. Push blocks into holes and over pits, avoid spikes, explore caves, and ride sea turtles in order to find keys, gems, and stars that unlock new paths and friends to aid you as you explore a collection of islands chock-full of puzzles and secrets.

  • The latest RimWorld update opens up more possible paths

    RimWorld was already a deep game, with so much on offer it's easy to get completely sucked into it and now that's going to be even more possible. With the latest update, the developer mentioned their aim has been to open up RimWorld to more progression paths. Enabling you to take the game in whatever direction tickles your fancy including tribal, outlander, pro-Empire, anti-Empire, neutral Empire, use Psycasters or not, use drugs or not, use ranching or not and whatever else. The point was to have the game AI and world respond sensibly to where you're headed.

  • Space Grunts 2 is a roguelike with card-based combat out now

    Merging together elements of a card-based deckbuilder with a traditional turn-based roguelike, Space Grunts 2 from Orangepixel has now left Early Access. Note: Key provided by the developer. This is the 9th game from Orangepixel to support Linux, and might possibly be my favourite yet! A very easy to get into game, with a satisfying gameplay loop that sees you travel through procedurally generated sci-fi environments with a tight pixel-art style.

Mozilla and Firefox Leftovers

  • Marco Zehe: Welcome to Marco's Accessibility Blog 2.0!

    Well, after 13 years, I felt it was time for something new. Also, as I wrote recently, Mozilla now has a dedicated accessibility blog, so I feel that I am free to do other things with my blog now. As a sign of that, I wanted to migrate it to a new platform. This is not to say the old platform, WordPress, is bad or anything like that. But for my needs, it has become much too heavy-weight in features, and also in the way how it feels when performing day to day tasks. 80% of features it offers are features I don't use. This pertains both to the blog system itself as well as its new block editor. But those features don't get out of the way easily, so over the months and actually last two to three years, I felt that I was moving mountains just to accomplish simple things. It has nothing to do with the steadily improving accessibility, either. That is, as I said, getting better all the time. It just feels heavy-weight to the touch and keyboard when using it.

  • Jeff Klukas: Encoding Usage History in Bit Patterns

    Monthly active users (MAU) is a windowed metric that requires joining data per client across 28 days. Calculating this from individual pings or daily aggregations can be computationally expensive, which motivated creation of the clients_last_seen dataset for desktop Firefox and similar datasets for other applications. A powerful feature of the clients_last_seen methodology is that it doesn’t record specific metrics like MAU and WAU directly, but rather each row stores a history of the discrete days on which a client was active in the past 28 days. We could calculate active users in a 10 day or 25 day window just as efficiently as a 7 day (WAU) or 28 day (MAU) window. But we can also define completely new metrics based on these usage histories, such as various retention definitions.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: WebXR Viewer 2.0 Released

    We are happy to announce that version 2.0 of WebXR Viewer, released today, is the first web browser on iOS to implement the new WebXR Device API, enabling high-performance AR experiences on the web that don't share pictures of your private spaces with third party Javascript libraries and websites. It's been almost a year since the previous release (version 1.17) of our experimental WebXR platform for iOS, and over the past year we've been working on two major changes to the app: (1) we updated the Javascript API to implement the official WebXR Device API specification, and (2) we ported our ARKit-based WebXR implementation from our minimal single-page web browser to the full-featured Firefox for iOS code-base.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Scaling Virtual Events with Hubs and Hubs Cloud

    Virtual events are unique, and each one has varying needs for how many users can be present. In this blog post, we’ll talk about the different ways that you can consider concurrency as part of a virtual event, the current capabilities of Mozilla Hubs and Hubs Cloud for supporting users, and considerations for using Hubs as part of events of varying sizes. If you’ve considered using Hubs for a meetup or conference, or are just generally interested in how the platform works, read on!

  • Extensions in Firefox 77

    Firefox 77 is loaded with great improvements for the WebExtensions API. These additions to the API will help you provide a great experience for your users. Optional Permissions Since Firefox 57, users have been able to see what permissions an extension wants to access during the installation process. The addition of any new permissions to the extension triggers another notification that users must accept during the extension’s next update. If they don’t, they won’t receive the updated version. These notifications were intended to provide transparency about what extensions can do and help users make informed decisions about whether they should complete the installation process. However, we’ve seen that users can feel overwhelmed by repeated prompts. Worse, failure to see and accept new permissions requests for updated versions can leave users stranded on older versions.

  • Moving SUMO Community synchronous communications to Matrix

    As some of you already know, Mozilla has been working for some time to replace its official synchronous communication tool, and earlier this year we decided to launch our own Matrix instance to host our public conversations. In SUMO, we historically maintained a Telegram group to enable synchronous communications, and now we want to transition it to the new Mozilla Matrix.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast and More

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S13E09 – Breaking mirrors

    This week we’ve been getting older and adding plugins to OBS Studio. We discuss Ubuntu being certified on the Raspberry Pi, Unity Remix, if Microsoft should buy Canonical and WSL getting GUI app support. We also round up our pick from the general tech news.

  • All Good Things | TechSNAP 430

    It's a storage showdown as Jim and Wes bust some performance myths about RAID and ZFS. Plus our favorite features from Fedora 32, and why Wes loves DNF.

  • Episode 11: Advice on Getting Started With Testing in Python

    Have you wanted to get started with testing in Python? Maybe you feel a little nervous about diving in deeper than just confirming your code runs. What are the tools needed and what would be the next steps to level up your Python testing? This week on the show we have Anthony Shaw to discuss his article on this subject. Anthony is a member of the Real Python team and has written several articles for the site. We discuss getting started with built-in Python features for testing and the advantages of a tool like pytest. Anthony talks about his plug-ins for pytest, and we touch on the next level of testing involving continuous integration.