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April 2007

File Server Configuration in Debian Using Samba

Filed under
HowTos

Samba is a suite of Unix applications that speak the SMB (Server Message Block) protocol. Many operating systems,including Windows and OS/2, use SMB to perform client-server networking. By supporting this protocol, Samba allows Unix servers to get in on the action, communicating with the same networking protocol as Microsoft Windows products.

Install Samba in Debian

The open source experience

Filed under
OSS

Our series concludes with a look at where enterprises are using non-proprietary software. Looks like those traditional IT infrastructure projects were just the beginning

Open source is generally recognized as a platform for infrastructure, the foundation upon which things are built. But the business-specific applications built on top of that are a harder sell.

Linux terminology jargon buster

Filed under
Linux

Something that can often confuse people who are new to Linux is all the terminology. For people who have been using Linux for some time, we often forget that a lot of this stuff can sound really really confusing.

Linux On Wall Street Is Not An Oxymoron. Or Is It?

Filed under
Linux

The Linux on Wall Street conference in New York is an attempt to highlight Linux and open source vendors and solutions, demonstrating and pontificating on how they all can work together.

But can they work together?

Kubuntu 7.04 "Feisty Fawn"

Filed under
Ubuntu

The latest release of Ubuntu/Kubuntu is "Feisty Fawn", version 7.04. I chose Kubuntu since I prefer the KDE desktop environment over the Gnome environment. I also chose to install with the DVD media version rather than loading in up to 5 CDs.

Installation

KDE’s Panel Vacuum

Filed under
KDE

I’m quite amazed by how technologies which I used to discard as ‘hype’ (like, Solid or Phonon or so) actually seem to work. For real. Maybe I should feel a bit of shame but I don’t since this reflex of being sceptical of projects which have a fancy code name but not visible code base has proven quite useful in the past - helps to avoid working on vapourware.

Would you use Windows if it was GPL?

Filed under
OSS

In my last post, several people accused me of being anti-Microsoft. This is not true at all! I believe that Microsoft makes good products. Do you think they could attain a 95% market share without making a good product? That is not the way a market economy works.

Review: Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

Another six months, another release from the Ubuntu folks. The Ubuntu 7.04 release, better known as Ubuntu Feisty Fawn, is another cutting-edge, but not bleeding-edge, release that shows what Linux is capable of on the desktop. I've been running it since the early betas, and have found that it's the best Ubuntu release yet.

The road to Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla developers have updated the Firefox 3 (Gran Paradiso) development release schedule providing details on what to expect on each of them. Most notable change is that milestone releases will be now date based, with monthly releases, a departure from the when ready basis that has ruled since I can remember.

Why is Ubuntu no. 1? Because of distrowatch!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has a lot of things going for it. I learned a lot through it, and it eased my entry into Linux from Windows. But what my title is trying to say is this distrowatch deserves credit for Ubuntu’s meteoric rise to fame.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux-driven i.MX8M Nano module is smallest yet

F&S announced a 40 x 35mm “PicoCore MX8MN” module that runs Linux on a single- or quad-core, 1.5GHz i.MX8M Nano with up to 8GB RAM, 32GB eMMC, and optional WiFi/Bluetooth and -40 to 85°C support. At Embedded World later this month, F&S Elektronik Systeme will show a working demo of a tiny compute module due in Q2 that runs a custom Linux stack on NXP’s i.MX8M Nano. At 40 x 35mm, the PicoCore MX8MN is the smallest of the Nano-based modules we’ve seen, which include IWave’s 67.6 x 37mm iW-RainboW-G34M-SM SODIMM module and a pair of 82 x 50mm SMARC modules: Congatec’s Conga-SMX8-Nano and Avnet/MSC’s MSC SM2S-IMX8MINI. Read more

Login and unlock in GNOME Shell 3.36

The upcoming GNOME 3.36 release includes a major update to the system login and unlock experience. The new design has been anticipated for a long time, and we’re excited that it has finally arrived! GNOME’s existing login and unlock design has been largely unaltered since it was first introduced in GNOME 3.6, back in September 2012. That’s seven and a half years ago! It’s therefore no surprise that we’ve wanted to update the design for some time. The initial round of design work for the new lock screen took place in 2017, at the GNOME UX hackfest in London. There, the GNOME design team, along with GNOME Shell developers, reviewed the goals and requirements, as well as the issues with the existing design, including the main areas of feedback that we’ve had. Read more

Evince chosen as the Librem 5 Document Viewer

The default Librem 5 applications define the out of the box experience. Our team has been hard at work adding essential apps that people expect from a smartphone. The latest is the popular FOSS document viewer Evince which we adapted using our powerful convergence library libhandy. We have put a lot of design and development into the idea of convergence – the ability to run applications on desktop and mobile without maintaining separate code basess or many additional views. libhandy has already been successfully used to adpat or build all the current Librem 5 apps including GNOME Settings, Epiphany, Calls, Chats and more. What makes libhandy so powerful for designers and developers is its simplicity. Just swap out your widget inheritance to use libhandy and add breakpoint logic. Read more