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April 2007

Ubuntu is not so bad

Filed under
Ubuntu

So, I’ve been a big fan of Ubuntu ever since I started playing with Linux. Ubuntu isn’t just the best version of Linux I’ve used, its the best operating system I’ve used.

Virtual Hosting With Proftpd And MySQL (Incl. Quota) On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Proftpd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota with this setup.

8 reasons why Linux won’t make it to the desktop

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Proliferation Agreement is intended as a means to promote the use of Linux on the desktop and asks endusers to become structurally involved in making Linux visible in the public domain. Apart from the support there came a wide range of counterarguments of things that Linux would need to change before it would ever become a viable choice.

Browse and set wallpaper in Openbox with feh

Filed under
HowTos

Pretty much since I started using Openbox, I’ve been wanting a simple way to change the wallpaper from the right-click menu. I eventually found a way, using a script that reads my wallpaper directory and lists files it finds there. Clicking on the menu entry triggers feh, which sets the image to the root window.

Windows and the OLPC XO

Filed under
OLPC

I am quite startled by those who predict gloom and doom because Windows (embedded) will be able to run on a general purpose OPEN computer like the XO.

Is our goal a protectionist society where an elite group tells you what you can or can not use on your computer? Or, is our goal an open society where we win on merit and innovation?

Linux VS Windows: Fair, Balanced, and Comprehensive

Are you curious about Linux? Or perhaps just plain tired of Windows? I have composed a comprehensive list of the differences found between Microsoft Windows and Linux. While I've taken a humorous bent on several of the entries, each comparison is essentially true, particularly the bit about the Developers' cats. Tell me what you think!

Areas in which Linux beats Windows, hands down:

Making Debian sexy again: Sam Hocevar speaks

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

How many developers run for the post of leader of the Debian GNU/Linux project and cite as part of their platform a desire to make Debian sexy again?

None that I know of - except Sam Hocevar who won the recent election for leader of the project. One among eight who put forward their cases to the 1043-odd developers who are eligible to vote, Hocevar modestly puts his election down to "luck."

Preparing for System Failure ... And Recovering Quickly

Filed under
HowTos

Despite the improvements made each year by GNU/Linux, KDE, and GNOME, recovering from failure is one of the recurring themes many new users struggle with. Why aren't we making it easier to prepare for, and recover from, failure? Here are some proposals to make recovery less painful.

Change the Default Drive Partitioning

Optimizing Xubuntu's user interface

Filed under
Linux

Xubuntu targets slower older hardware with limited resources and display size like my IBM Thinkpad with 1 Gig Intel processor 250 Mb memory, 30 Gig hard drive and 14 inch display size.

Mastering Mutt : A Few Basic Commands

Filed under
HowTos

Now, why in the world would I want to use a text-based email client?

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Felipe Borges: Call for Project ideas for Google Summer of Code 2021

    It is that time of the year again when we start gathering ideas for Google Summer Code. This time around we will be posting and discussing proposals in GNOME’s GitLab instance. Therefore, if you have a project idea that fits Google Summer of Code, please file an issue at https://gitlab.gnome.org/Teams/Engagement/gsoc-2021/-/issues/new using the “Proposal” template. Everybody is welcome to add ideas, but it would be nice to verify whether the ideas are realistic and mentorship for it will be available. We encourage you to discuss your ideas with designers in #gnome-design to get their input and plan collaboration, especially if your ideas are related to one of the core GNOME modules.

  • Standard Technology Presents Opportunities for Medical Record Data Extraction

    To address these challenges, health care can adapt the same technological approaches that have revolutionized other industries by incorporating digital tools called application programming interfaces (APIs). These tools allow personal finance websites to aggregate information from banks and credit card companies to provide consumers a complete picture of their spending habits, for example, or let travel services compare flights from multiple airlines without the user having to visit each airline’s site individually. If standard APIs were broadly adopted in health care, patients could access and compile their data from multiple providers while clinicians could process complicated information and make care recommendations. APIs would also offer other benefits, such as facilitating the exchange of clinical data among health care providers.

    This report will focus on three health care benefits of APIs:

    Patient access to data.

    The incorporation of clinical decision support (CDS) tools, such as risk calculators or apps that provide recommendations for prescribing antibiotics.

    Provider-to-provider exchange of information.

  • How the pandemic is accelerating enterprise open source adoption [Ed: Microsoft openwashing and hijack of the voice of its opposition]

    In an interview with VentureBeat, GitHub VP Mario Rodriguez said, “Open source project creation just kind of shoots up” after March. He added, “2020 is interesting because everything from a technology perspective got accelerated, and you were trying to do more and more.”

  • How SUSE Empowers our Partners

    Today, five to ten percent of all enterprise applications are containerized. According to Forrester, over the next three to four years, this will grow to over 50 percent. We believe that we have the right technology with Rancher, a full software stack that gives you everything you need to adopt and run containers in production with Kubernetes.

  • Top Kubernetes Management Platforms

    The open source Kubernetes container orchestration platform is the foundation of cloud native deployments and is widely used by organizations of all sizes. At the foundational level, Kubernetes is an open source project, originally started by Google and now developed as a multi-stakeholder effort under the auspices of the Linux Foundation’s Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Kubernetes enables organization to deploy, manage and scale application container workloads in an automated policy driven approach. It’s a model that also helps to enable both hybrid and multi-cloud computing, with organizations able to span Kubernetes workloads across on-premises and multiple public cloud environments as well.

First Look at MX Linux Fluxbox on the Raspberry Pi 4

MX Linux Fluxbox-RaspberryPi Respin is MX Linux’s first attempt to offer an AArch64 (ARM64) port for the Raspberry Pi single-board computer. The work is done by Jerry Bond and others, and let me tell you that it’s one of the best Linux on Raspberry Pi experiences I’ve tried so far in terms of performance and usability. I’m not a fan of the Fluxbox window manager, but I understand why Jerry Bond choose it as default graphical environment for this Raspberry Pi spin of MX Linux. It’s super fast and consumes very few resources. For example, the RAM usage is always around 300MB (without any apps running), and that’s very important for older devices, such as a Raspberry Pi 3 with 2GB RAM. Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • CloudLinux expands its Extended Lifecycle Support services for Linux distributions

    CloudLinux announces the expansion of its affordable Extended Lifecycle Support (ELS) services for Linux distributions, by providing its own updates and security patches for several years after expiration of the products’ end-of-life date. For example, support for CentOS 6 from Red Hat expired November 30 last year. CloudLinux offers ELS for CentOS 6, available since November, 2020 and extends to June 2024. Oracle Linux 6 (ends March 2021) Extended Lifecycle Support service will be available starting in February 2021 and will extend to February 2025. Extended Lifecycle Support service for Ubuntu 16.04 (ends April 2021) and Debian 9 (ends June 2022) is under development.

  • Moving your applications to the cloud with Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is widely deployed on-premise to run a variety of applications, but more conservative customers may need guidance in taking their first steps toward the cloud. One of the features in RHEL 8.3 is Image Builder’s Push to Cloud capability, which can help simplify and accelerate the transformation of workloads to the cloud. Building custom images is just one way to deploy RHEL for your enterprise. [...] RHEL provides a stable, manageable platform for applications for architects, operations, developers. Though some organizations may be hesitant to deploy an open source OS, RHEL is a supported solution, and there are ways to give it a try.

  • Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.6 Offers New Data Resilience Capabilities

    Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.6 helps enterprises expand their existing data protection capabilities to include Kubernetes applications, without requiring additional technology or infrastructure upgrades. Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4.6 delivers snapshot functionality orchestrated by the Container Storage Interface (CSI) for customizable, point-in-time snapshots and clones of persistent data volumes. This makes it easier for IT administrators and application developers to more quickly return to a prior state.

  • Elastic Deep Learning in high performance multitenant cluster

    The Elastic Deep Learning capabilities of IBM Watson® Machine Learning Accelerator are designed for large-scale distributed deep learning workloads. It transforms static monolithic training into a dynamic process that is resilient to failures and automatically scales GPU allocation while training. Data scientists, deep learning developers, and administrators can use Elastic Deep Learning capabilities to simplify production deployment, improve run time efficiency, and deliver on service level agreements (SLAs).

  • How to Install Webmin on Fedora Linux

    Keeping an eye on your system’s performance is one of the essential tasks that any Linux user should undertake from time to time. This helps in diagnosing any bottlenecks that are likely to impact performance. Webmin is a free and open-source front-end monitoring and administration tool that helps Linux users have a glance at various system metrics and perform administration tasks without the need of running commands on the terminal.

Ubuntu: Design and Web, Kubernetes, and More of Canonical

  • Design and Web team summary – 27th January 2021

    The web team here at Canonical run two-week iterations. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work from this iteration.

  • Canonical & Kubernetes: 2020 highlights

    We’re now well into 2021, and as we plan ahead for our roadmap and activities around Kubernetes for the year, it helps to look back and reflect on everything that took place for Canonical in the K8s space within the year that passed. Kubernetes has always been a crucial part of Canonical’s vision and contribution to the IT world. All leading cloud providers, such as Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Cisco and IBM run cloud Kubernetes services on Ubuntu, because we focus on the latest container capabilities in modern kernels. This focus is why Ubuntu is also the top choice for on-premises enterprise Kubernetes, with MicroK8s, kubeadm and Charmed Kubernetes all supported by Canonical.

  • Magewell HDMI Capture with ffmpeg ·

    On Linux, no additional driver is needed. When attached to a USB port the Magewell device shows up under /dev/video* on Linux. There’s a few software options available to capture the stream including VLC and OBS, but I prefer to use a little script. I call it make_screencast and it lives in my /home/alan/bin folder, on the machine capturing the video. The script is below.