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April 2007

Freespire 2.0, Linspire 6.0, CNR v2 rollout plans published

Filed under
Linux

Linspire has published the release schedules for its two Linux distributions -- Linspire and Freespire -- and the overhaul of its CNR (click-and-run) software update system to support multiple Linux distributions, including Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu.

The Truth About Open Source Security

Filed under
OSS

Open source software -- it's fast, it's popular, it's practical, and, best of all, it's free.

GNOME 2.19.1 released

Filed under
Software

Version 2.19.1 of the GNOME desktop environment has been released with much exclamation. "Welcome to the new GNOME development cycle! Please fasten your seat belt: you're going to see a lot of exciting new changes!, new features!, new bugfixes!, new translations!, new documentation!.

Open Source Needs Better Public Relations

Filed under
OSS

Webopedia.com defines open source as “… a program in which source code is available to the general public for use and/or modification from its original design free of charge, i.e. open.” It is a simple definition. To me, it means that there is software out there on the net that has been put together by a community of people.

Building the XO: Porting a PyGTK game to Sugar, part two

Filed under
HowTos

In the last lesson we learned about what made Block Party tick. In this lesson, we will turn the same PyGtk codebase into a Sugar activity with only minimal modification of the core code.

Operating System Showdown: Ubuntu Vs. Vista

Filed under
Humor

Other tech sites will bore you with in-depth "technical details" and performance specs in their product analysis. At BBspot we pull back from the boring benchmarks to compare the superficialities, and we do it all on a single page.

blender

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Using the policy of bad-news-first: Blender’s interface is just flat-out confusing. I’ve been double-teaming my learning with a copy of the No Starch Press’s Blender Book and some of the free video tutorials from the Blender site.

Review: SimplyMEPIS Linux 6.5

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

A few weeks ago, MEPIS released SimplyMEPIS 6.5. The latest version of the Ubuntu-based desktop distribution offers a number of interesting new features, including a 64-bit release and Beryl for 3-D desktop effects. After spending a fair amount of time with the release, I found it to be a worthy update to earlier versions of MEPIS.

Ubuntu: making things easier

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’ve had my eye on the Beryl project for some time now. Problem is, I’m a loyal Slackware user, and it’s a royal pain in the rear getting it to work on the platform. Beryl isn’t the only problem child, either. I’ve never been able to get Gcdmaster working, and the less said about DVD authoring, the better.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Open Hardware and Some Traps

  • AgVa Phone Ventilator Connects to a Smartphone to Fight COVID-19

    One major highlight during this COVID-19 crisis is the lack of enough ventilators for patients, a piece of critical equipment that greatly affects the breathing of critically ill patients. There are not enough ventilators available in hospitals right now for all of the potential patients who will be struck by the virus, so it is clear we need more ventilators. Makers are joining the call to service with their existing maker tools, and an example is the attempt to make a low-cost, open-source Arduino ventilator device.

  • Raspberry Pi Dev Server Manages Triple-Boot System With Help From Ubuntu

    This Raspberry Pi project covers all of your on-the-go developer needs. Designed by a developer known as CodeF.red, it uses a Raspberry Pi 4 running Ubuntu to help manage his triple boot laptop rig. With the portable dev server, he can easily swap between the Windows, macOS and Linux. The server is running Ubuntu off an NVME drive connected via USB (we have also detailed how to install Ubuntu on Raspberry Pi). The unit is controllable with a Bluetooth keyboard and also features a touchscreen. The maker also upgraded the Pi's cooling capabilities with a 5V Noctua fan with a super-low noise profile. The dev server uses Docker and can be controlled via SSH. Since it uses Ubuntu, you can add plenty of additional tools, like Glances for cross-platform monitoring features. Like many other Pi projects, the creator crafted this one using hardware already had on hand. CodeF.red said via Reddit that he considers the NVMe drive "overkill," especially since the performance is limited by the USB connection. But after removing the drive from an old Mac, it was gathering dust and needed to be put to use.

  • Digital making at home: a guide for parents
  • NXP WiFi 6 Solutions Launched for Home, Enterprise, IoT and Automotive Markets
  • 3.5″ SubCompact SBC Leverages Intel Whiskey Lake Processor for Embedded & AI Applications

    The company provides Windows drivers for graphics, audio, I2C, touch controller, Ethernet, etc… Linux will certainly boot in the board, and I’d expect most features to work, but it’s still possible that some specific hardware features, like the touch controller, may not work properly or at all.

Google Chromebook vs. Gallium Chromebook

Chromebooks have been improving a lot over the years. They’re not just web browsers with keyboards anymore. Many Chromebooks can now run Linux programs via an included Crostini virtual machine container, and many can also run Android apps. (As long as it’s not enrolled in enterprise management: Be careful about buying refurbished Chromebooks.) Those additions can greatly improve the usefulness of Chromebooks and greatly reduces their limitations. A few months ago, I wrote that a $99 Chromebook with Gallium OS installed is so much better. That was just an editorial with a “how to” though and I didn’t provide any in-depth experimentation or proof, so that’s what we’re going to do in this article. I bought two refurbished $60 Lenovo N22 Chromebooks and installed Gallium OS on one of them while letting the other one update itself to the latest version of Chrome OS 80. This is after I got them un-enrolled from Google’s Enterprise Management of course. Read more

Canonical/Ubuntu: Snap Store, Center for Internet Security (CIS) and MAAS

  • An adventure through the Snap Store

    An application store with a large number of entries is a double-edged sword. It’s often a good sign of a vibrant, thriving community of software creators, developers and users working together. But then, people new to the ecosystem may struggle finding relevant content right away. The Snap Store currently offers about 7,000 applications, so exploration and discovery can take quite a bit of time and effort. We’d like to help you find useful, interesting applications by taking you on a little tour through the Snap Store.

  • CIS hardened Ubuntu: cyber attack and malware prevention for mission-critical systems

    The Center for Internet Security (CIS) is a nonprofit organisation that uses a community-driven process to release benchmarks to safeguard enterprises against cyber attacks. It is one of the most recognised industry standards that provides comprehensive configuration checklists to identify and remediate security vulnerabilities in a computing environment. CIS benchmark has hundreds of configuration recommendations, so hardening a system manually can be very tedious. For large deployments and clouds that may not be practically viable. To drastically improve this process for enterprises, Canonical has made CIS automation tooling available to its Ubuntu Advantage for Infrastructure customers. The compliance tooling has two objectives: it lets our customers harden their Ubuntu systems effortlessly and then quickly audit those systems against the published CIS Ubuntu benchmarks. The SCAP content for audit tooling that scans the system for compliance is CIS certified.

  • Questioning the doc

    Here’s a VLOG about some changes we’re making to the MAAS documentation. It’s all about using questions at the top of articles to help direct attention. This idea grew out of our frustration over long pages with lots of complex information. We tried a top table of contents, but that looks weird and requires a lot of policing to keep up-to-date.