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March 2007

KDE 4 gets more Hot New Stuff

Filed under
KDE

Since KDE 3.3 was released in 2004, KDE applications have used the KDELibs library KNewStuff to implement a simple interface for downloading and installing content from a centralized server.

SyllableOS 0.6.3

Filed under
OS

We’re not all about Linux here at FOSSwire - in fact I personally love trying out any alternative and wacky platform you can give me, so today we’re going to stray from our usual Linux territory a bit and take a look at another free and open source operating system, SyllableOS.

I thought I’d take a quick look at the 0.6 release, so I grabbed the 0.6.3 Live CD and booted it.

HOWTO Play With Your Old QBasic Programs on Linux

Filed under
Software

Most any geek who was a kid in the 80's played with BASIC at some point. And the BASIC language with one of the biggest followings is Microsoft QBasic - Microsoft's sole nod to the hobbyist programmer community. Dozens of online sites exist today that are devoted to QBasic, Quick Basic, and Basica, existing in much the same spheres as the surviving BBS/ ANSI art culture.

Linux - Partial Success

Filed under
Linux

Well it seems I have had at least a partial success with the installation of Linux onto this machine. Numerous attempts with openSUSE, Ubuntu and Solaris all failed dismally.

Armed With Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Our product tester offers a guide to enterprise-ready open- source security tools

Executive Profile: Linspire's Kevin Carmony

Filed under
Linux

After founding, running and selling numerous companies, Kevin Carmony saw his run at MP3.com end in a month when it was purchased by Vivendi Universal. Then Linspire founder Michael Robertson asked him, "What do you know about Linux?" Carmony responded, "I know nothing about it."

Morning Upgrade Breakage

Filed under
Ubuntu

For a pretty long time I've been mildly annoyed at the constant "New updates available" notification bubble that pops more or less every day (Ubuntu Edgy Eft). Yes, it's good that the vendor is actively trying to make my desktop as secure as possible, by quickly providing fixes for recent vulnerabilities, and it gives me as a user confidence that Ubuntu is taking security seriously.

Some Quickies:

Filed under
OSS

GoblinX Premium 2007.1 is released.

Filed under
Linux

The GoblinX Premium 2007.1 is released.

The special edition created to be the main operating system of the
goblin fan, our O.S. Replacement, starts the second generation of the
distribution, full of news, special features and upgrades.

The livecd system is upgraded to use AuFS instead of UnionFS, which
brings more stability and less bugs to the system, also the Kernel

3D drivers matrix - the evolution

Filed under
Hardware
Software

Did you game well? If no, is it because you had 3D driver issues and couldn’t make head nor tail out of this mess? Here, I discuss the most recent driver releases on the most demanding 3D application there is today on the GNU/Linux desktop.

You guessed it, 3D desktops! Since this article is getting a bit old, it’s time for an update.

3D drivers matrix—the evolution

More in Tux Machines

Games: art of rally, Navi, Proton

  • art of rally strips down the furious sport into a serene top-down experience

    From the creator of Absolute Drift comes art of rally, a top-down racing game that heavy on style and it has great gameplay to back it up too. Here's the thing: i don't drive. Not in real life and any attempt at doing so seriously in games always comes with massive amount of hilarious failure. I'm terrible at DiRT Rally, I'm equally as crap at the F1 series, back when GRID Autosport came to Linux a lot of my time was spent on my roof and…you get the idea. They're all actually a little brutal for people like me - which is why I've come to appreciate the calmer side of it all thanks to the magnificent art of rally.

  • A Linux update may have let slip AMD Big Navi's mammoth core specs

    The summer of leaks continues, this time with the attention turning to AMD's next-gen GPUs based on the RDNA 2 architecture, which we'll find out more about on October 28. An enterprising redditor (via Tom's Hardware) was digging around the Radeon Open Compute (ROCm) code and discovered what appears to be a specification list for two of AMD's next generation GPUs.

  • Proton: More Games to Play

    Proton is amazing, and it’s easy to lose sight of all that it can do. Here’s a few videos I picked up recently to showcase some of the latest tested games running on Linux via Proton/Steamplay, as captured in video.

Mozilla: Fake News and AI Fund

  • How to spot (and do something) about real fake news

    Think you can spot fake news when you see it? You might be surprised even the most digitally savvy folks can (at times) be fooled into believing a headline or resharing a photo that looks real, but is actually not.

  • Launching the European AI Fund

    Right now, we’re in the early stages of the next phase of computing: AI. First we had the desktop. Then the internet. And smartphones. Increasingly, we’re living in a world where computing is built around vast troves of data and the algorithms that parse them. They power everything from the social platforms and smart speakers we use everyday, to the digital machinery of our governments and economies. In parallel, we’re entering a new phase of how we think about, deploy, and regulate technology. Will the AI era be defined by individual privacy and transparency into how these systems work? Or, will the worst parts of our current internet ecosystem — invasive data collection, monopoly, opaque systems — continue to be the norm? A year ago, a group of funders came together at Mozilla’s Berlin office to talk about just this: how we, as a collective, could help shape the direction of AI in Europe. We agreed on the importance of a landscape where European public interest and civil society organisations — and not just big tech companies — have a real say in shaping policy and technology. The next phase of computing needs input from a diversity of actors that represent society as a whole.

Is Open Source a Religion?

Is open source a religion? There is a persistent myth that free/open source software (F/OSS) supporters think of F/OSS as a religion. SUSE is the largest open source software company, so that would make us, what, a church with the cutest mascot? Of course this is wrong and F/OSS is not a religion, though the idea of working in a hushed cathedral-like atmosphere with pretty stained glass and organ music is appealing. (Visit St. John’s Cathedral in Spokane, Washington, USA to see a real genuine full-sized pipe organ. When it hits the low notes it rattles your bones from the inside.) If I really want stained glass and my own cathedral I can have those for just because, so let us move on to what F/OSS is really about, and what the value is for everyone who touches it, like customers, vendors, learners, hobbyists, governments– you might be surprised at the reach of F/OSS and its affect on the lives of pretty much everyone. Read more

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