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December 2006

Knoppix v5.1.0 LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

In time for the new year, Knoppix 5.1.0 has been released. Even with Windows users, Knoppix is an incredibly GNU/Linux LiveCD that offers a great deal of desktop functionality and features.

Linux hard drive benchmark & bottleneck testing software suite for performance

Filed under
HowTos

The stress test of hardware (hard drive benchmarks) is a simplistic test. There are a number of benchmarking applications software that can be used as hard disk (storage) stress testing. My favorite is Bonnie++ software.

How to install 3D-Desktop using Beryl

Filed under
HowTos

Windows Vista provides two entirely new features to manage windows using Windows Flip and Windows Flip 3D. Linux is already using this technology. 3D-Desktop is an OpenGL program for switching virtual desktops in a seamless 3-dimensional manner on Linux. This workshop describes the 3D Desktop installation on Mandriva 2007 using Beryl and Nvidia graphics cards.

Windows screwup forces Ubuntu shift

Filed under
Ubuntu

YOU NEVER QUITE wrap your head around how anti-consumer Microsoft's policies are until they bite you in the bum. Add in the customer antagonistic policies of its patsies, HP in this case, and vendors like Promise, and you have quite a recipe for pain. Guess what I did today?

'$100 laptop' software may prove revolutionary

Filed under
Misc

Forget windows, folders and boxes that pop up with text. When students in Thailand, Libya and other developing countries get their $150 computers from the One Laptop Per Child project in 2007, their experience will be unlike anything on standard PCs.

Amarok Weekly News Issue 4 Released

Filed under
Software

Late but worthy -- that's how one can call this issue of Amarok Weekly News. It talks about new or updated Amarok features, and continues to provide tips and links to interesting scripts. As a bonus, kind of a New Year gift, we provide you an experimental RSS feed, for your pleasure. Enjoy!

Float your conky

Filed under
HowTos

Just about every conky setup I see has it pegged to the desktop, immovable and locked into place. To that end, I cooked up a .conkyrc that I can use the ALT key and the left mouse button (the standard window drag combo) to move conky around the desktop.

Enterprise Linux 2006--A Year Of Deals

Filed under
Linux

In the enterprise Linux space, 2006 was marked by greater expansion of Linux into vertical markets, new products, and most notably, a string of surprise business deals among vendors. The year also bore witness to an increasing trend, of sorts, among Novell, Oracle, and other software companies to justify their actions on the basis of "customer demand."

Ubuntu User's Open Letter to Free Software Foundation

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Free Software Foundation is recommending gNewSense and Ututo as beginners' Linux distributions. Ubuntu user and member Ryan Lortie has written an Open Letter to the FSF raising some big points dealing with the goals of the FSF and how to accomplish them. We bring you the full text.

More in Tux Machines

SUSE: Containers, IBM, Predictions and Openwashing SAP

  • Demystifying Containers – Part III: Container Images

    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.

  • Announcing the new IBM LinuxONE III – Combined with SUSE for One of the Most Secure Platforms on the Planet

    Our guest blog writer is Kara Todd, Director of Linux at IBM with an exciting announcement from IBM – with SUSE Linux Enterprise playing an integral role! Announcing the new IBM LinuxONE III – the system you need for the most secure, flexible system to support your initiatives today, and you need that system to grow and evolve with you for tomorrow. The latest LinuxONE system was designed to support your mission-critical initiatives and allow you to be innovative as you design and scale your environment. LinuxONE III provides features for advanced data protection and privacy, enterprise resiliency and scalability, and cloud enablement and integration. These tools set the foundation to enable you to build with flexibility, deliver with confidence, and protect the future.

  • Top 10 Technology Predictions for 2019 Revisited – Here’s my Personal Performance Appraisal

    Open source continues to play a key role in all these other dominant technology trends. That’s why 82% of large organizations are more receptive to open source than they were 5 years ago, and 83% of hiring managers are looking for open source talent as a priority. So, how did I do overall with my predictions? Based on my own appraisal, I scored a creditable 9/10, and I’m feeling pretty good about that. However, I guess I wasn’t taking a huge risk. By way of full disclosure, I track all of these trends as part of my role at SUSE, and as a leading technology partner, SUSE works very closely with all its customers.

  • Introduction to SUSE Linux Enterprise is now available on openSAP

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

The community-led renaissance of open source

With few commercial participants, early free software and open source communities were, by definition, community-led. Software was designed and created organically by communities of users in response to their needs and inspiration. The results, to a degree nobody predicted, were often magical. First-generation open source businesses like Red Hat emerged to respond to these needs. They combined the best of both worlds: the flexibility and control of raw open source with the commercial support that enterprises depend on. These new open source businesses found their opportunity by adding the missing—but necessary—commercial services to community-led open source projects. These services would be costly for organizations to provide on their own and potentially even more costly to do without. One early leader of that era, Cygnus Solutions, even adopted the counter-intuitive tagline "Making free software affordable." But back then, it was always overwhelmingly clear: The commercial vendors were in service of the community, filling in around the edges to enable commercial applications. The community was the star, and the companies were the supporting cast. Read more