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October 2006

PCLinuxOS Magazine November 2006 Issue 3 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

It is my privilege to announce on behalf of the team members of the PCLinuxOS Magazine Project sponsored by MyPCLinuxOS.com, the November 2006 issue is available for download!

Open Source Will Never Die

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OSS

No matter how hard people or companies like SCO try, nor how muchothers believe they know the commercial market, open source will never die.

LDAP Series Part IV - Installing OpenLDAP on Debian

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HowTos

I can imagine the comments we'll see on this article. What about X distribution? And so on... I'm not going to justify my reasons for choosing Debian. You can use whatever distro you want. It's just a matter of preference.

Will Oracle's 'Standardization' Offset Linux Fragmentation?

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Linux

While Oracle's moves to provide enterprise-level support around Red Hat Linux are stirring up controversy, the vendor's decision to join the Free Standards Group (FSG), also unveiled last week, is capturing less attention. Yet is it possible that Oracle's newly minted membership in the standards group might actually help to dispel industry fragmentation?

Picture your disk space with 3-D filesystem browsers

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Software

You don't need a Ph.D. in scientific visualization to have some fun with three-dimensional data. Whether you're searching for an unused nook in a cramped disk partition, or trying to find the bloated temp/ folder that's crashing your system, sometimes the flat folder view of a traditional GUI file browser is little help. Luckily, Linux offers a variety of 3-D filesystem that can make your disk usage statistics come alive.

Quake 3 on Ubuntu Edgy x86_64

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Gaming
Ubuntu
HowTos

Installing Quake III Arena on a 64-bit Linux box isn't that bad actually. I couldn't find instructions anywhere on how to do this, so after figuring it out I'm writing them down here.

ATI 8.30.3 Display Drivers

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Reviews

There have been a swirl of speculations as to whether AMD will open-source the ATI Linux fglrx display drivers, and today the first display driver (8.30.3) is being pushed out after the completion of the ATI and AMD acquisition. But are these drivers still closed-source? Has any new information hit the wire about these rumors? We have the ATI fglrx 8.30.3 display drivers in our hands today to tell you all of the details.

Fedora Core 6 Innovates Unabated

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Linux
Reviews

In its first five releases, Red Hat's Fedora Core has represented the Linux technology vanguard. And so it is with Fedora Core 6. The fast-moving Red Hat distribution polishes SELinux, adds new tools and improves performance.

Why Gaming Sucks On Linux

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Gaming

Despite last week's article about running World of Warcraft on Linux with CodeWeavers' CrossOver, I can't help but feel a sense of despair when I think of gaming under Linux. It seems that over the last few years, with a few exceptions, things have gotten worse rather than better. Frankly, I've had it with gaming under Linux. It's not worth the time or the effort.

How to install Linux on an eMac

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HowTos

Why replace Mac OS X with Linux on an Apple eMac? I did it to revive an aging hardware platform and provide a computer to a friend. Here's how I replaced "Tiger" (OS X 10.1) first with Debian, then Ubuntu.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

The community-led renaissance of open source

With few commercial participants, early free software and open source communities were, by definition, community-led. Software was designed and created organically by communities of users in response to their needs and inspiration. The results, to a degree nobody predicted, were often magical. First-generation open source businesses like Red Hat emerged to respond to these needs. They combined the best of both worlds: the flexibility and control of raw open source with the commercial support that enterprises depend on. These new open source businesses found their opportunity by adding the missing—but necessary—commercial services to community-led open source projects. These services would be costly for organizations to provide on their own and potentially even more costly to do without. One early leader of that era, Cygnus Solutions, even adopted the counter-intuitive tagline "Making free software affordable." But back then, it was always overwhelmingly clear: The commercial vendors were in service of the community, filling in around the edges to enable commercial applications. The community was the star, and the companies were the supporting cast. Read more

Election fraud: Is there an open source solution?

Can open source technology help keep our elections honest? With its Trust The Vote Project, the Open Source Election Technology (OSET) Institute is working on making that a reality for elections in the United States and around the world. The project is developing an open, adaptable, flexible, full-featured, and innovative elections technology platform called ElectOS. It will support all aspects of elections administration and voting, including creating, marking, casting, and counting ballots and managing all back-office functions. The software is freely available under an Open Source Initiative (OSI)-recognized public license for adoption, adaptation, and deployment by anyone, including elections jurisdictions directly or, more commonly, commercial vendors or systems integrators. Read more

Meld is an excellent file and folder comparison tool for Windows and Linux

Ever had two sets of the same files and folders and couldn't decide which one to retain? It may take a long time to actually open each to verify the one that's recent or the one you need; while dates associated with the files may help, they won't all the time as they don't tell you anything about the actual content. This is where file comparison tools can be time-savers. Meld is an open source file comparison tool for Windows and Linux for exactly that purpose. Read more